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Talking

Dora - posted on 05/03/2010 ( 8 moms have responded )

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Hello My Daughter Maya is going to be5 in a couple of weeks and still doesnt talk much other than repeating her tv shows and stuff from school i was wondering if as she gets older will she carry a conversation with her brothers and sister Im am new to this somethimes it gets to me because my baby cant communicate verbaly with me.

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Diane - posted on 05/06/2010

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My son Robert who will turn five this august. Just woke up. He came out reciting his thoughts about going to preschool today. He and I have made up "a social story" about what he does on these days. When I try to say hello to him he doesn't answer because he is saying his words out loud. When I think he is finished I then try to engage him only to find that he is now onto something else. When he does bring a book for me to read and he does ask me to read it he briefly looks me in the eye. Basically i go with his flow and give thanks to what conversation I get.

Jessica - posted on 05/06/2010

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You've probably also heard this from lots of other people, but don't insist on the standard face-to-face kind of conversation style. My almost 8 yr old son with Asperger's is hyperverbal, but he paces as he talks, and it's very difficult for him to stand still and talk, especially if you insist on normal eye contact. It's just too distracting for him to think about his train of thought and register other people's body and facial language at the same time. Taking walks or doing some other physical activity (rolling or bouncing a ball, popping bubbles, coloring, whatever) might make it a little easier for her to talk with you.

Lisa - posted on 05/06/2010

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Hi Dora, my son is 21 now and is still very limited with his speech, but he uses other communication devices to "talk" to us, so do not fear the future keep working towards it and bringing out the best in your daughter, so that she can reach her full potential. Communication devices are set up to suit each person and their situation, so ask at school or speech therapist, they can help you along the way. Good Luck, its not easy, but it is worth it

User - posted on 05/05/2010

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Hi Dora,

I have posted this before, but I always think if it worked for one child it might work for another...and then that means it might work for another...

The little boy that this method worked for is one of my little heroes. He gave me so much hope for my little guy and when you are struggling every day, when you see such a shining example of success you know that "giving up" is never an option.

This is the method that a friend used for her non-verbal child. It takes a huge amount of time, so be patient. It can also be very frustrating and heart-breaking....but you need to give this a year..not four weeks, not three months...it is at least a one year commitment once you start.

Set up a little table. This is your work space. Not the kitchen table, but someplace where when you go your little one will know that you are there to "work."

He sits on one side, you the other.
I am using bubbles as the motivator because this is what motivated my friend's son.

Have a picture card of the bubbles.
Do you want mommy to blow bubbles? (wait for a nod, and if he doesn't nod, gently nod his head (finger to chin) as you nod his face, nod your own.
Yes, mommy and Stevie love bubbles....
now blow.
Do this four or five times in a row.
Now, do this until he finally nods for you.
Once he begins nodding, wait a week or so before moving on to next step, but keep blowing bubbles every day and having him nod.
STEP 2
Get a picture of the bubbles.
Do you want mommy to blow bubbles?
(should nod)
Give mommy the bubble picture
(guide his hand over the picture in order to give it to you)
Oh, you want the bubbles, ME TOO!
Blow....do this four or five times.
Repeat this every day until he finally gives you the picture then solidify this step for a week or so

STEP #
Do you want bubbles,
he should nod and give picture
Say bubbles....(but you can wait for the B sound, that is good enough!)
model making the B sound, see how my lips make the b sound, gently place his fingers on your lips
This step might take AGES, it might even be too much and you then need to go back to step two and work on identifying other pictures (eg...do you want your drink, nods and gives picture)

But, let's be optimistic and he finally says B sound....
blow bubbles and

Step FOUR

Do you want bubbles,
nods, gives pictures and says B
Your job now is to get him to stretch out the entire word...it might be REALLY challenging, it might be very chaotic, and his temper might fly...YOU CANNOT REACT to TEMPER...you are the anchor in the storm that keeps him with you...his soft place to fall. He screams, yells, flips the table...no matter
right the table, have a new jar of bubbles,
You want the bubbles?
Say bub- bub
You are building a path through autism...you are basically attempting to rewire so that the message that is stuck in his brain is able to make it's way into and out of his mouth

Once he says Bubbles...move on! Pick other motivators (penny candy, crayons, magnets, stickers, WHATEVER HE WANTS!!)

Add words...(avoid pronouns in the beginning)
Billy wants bubbles...(if you can, learn the signs for these words so that he is getting an auditory and visual message)

Good luck Dora!

Sheila

Dora - posted on 05/04/2010

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I know my heart soared when she first uttered the work mom which was only a few months ago

Taz - posted on 05/04/2010

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my son is 4 and has never spoken, he is autistic and is very delayed, cant wait for those first words though lol

Erin - posted on 05/03/2010

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Have you tried making conversation a script for her in the same way that the phrases in her daily media are? It might help if you worked some of these phrases into conversation. Like one of our students scripts "walk around the block" So the response is, "what is that from?" If she is asking for your attention or is trying to tell you something about school she may be repeating these phrases to engage you in conversation.

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