Teachers

Karen - posted on 05/18/2010 ( 15 moms have responded )

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If I just had a quarter for every time I heard a teacher say "You JUST need to get Ja writting then he could be in regular classes." At 12 my sons writting is worse than my 6 yr olds SO HOW then after the SWEET SWEET victory of getting his teachers to realize he is passing tests because he's paying attention EVEN if he's not staring at them to I EVEN BEGIN to tackle this giant. "YES I KNOW he is intelligent...NOOOOO he can't go in a regular class. NO I do NOT think my son is stupid he JUST CAN'T HANDLE all the overstimulation in a large group setting." I'm adding that to my tape recording of "No mouth noises in church," "Don't make me come in there" and "Today isn't a Pokemon day you HAVE to talk about something else...that's Wednesday, Thursdday, and Friday" and "You CAN NOT walt around with a coathanger,a battery from the garbagecan! a toothbrush, and a toothpic unless you can explain HOW you're useing them to play!!"

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Jean - posted on 05/30/2010

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My son uses an Alpha-Smart as well, he's had one at school since the 4th grade and now that he's a Junior, he still uses it in every class. It's a wonderful tool. His English-3 teacher just this week told me that his writing for content is terrific. Plus it's very sturdy - the one he's using now has been dropped at least a dozen times. It runs on regular AA batteries - fantastic tool. I had to provide a small printer for his homeroom so that he can print his work easily, and at his IEP meetings and at the beginning of the school year, I personally remind all his teachers of his terrible handwriting. I've been lucky to have a wonderful Charter School with teachers who are willing to listen and work with us.

Michelle - posted on 05/30/2010

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can he have a laptop instead?? i have a close friend whose gorgeous boy is adhd and aspergers, he had issues with hand writing so he has a laptop that he does all his handwriting work on, its been super helpful for him and less stressful for his teachers...just a thought!

Emily - posted on 05/30/2010

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I'm New here so Hello everyone. I have a 10 year old son with Aspergers,Adhd,Social anxiety, Mood disorder. He started having issues at 4 and a half, but was only diaginoised 14 months ago. I heard so many times the school principal, the teachers, special eduction workers say "hes just so disobedient he needs a good lesson" I fought and fought without a diagnois through kindergartion and 2 years of first grade and the most awful year of 2nd grade. Once the hospitail handed me my sons diagnois i went start to my computer and hired a lawyer/child autism advocate to fight the school. LoL she walked in to the first school meeting attitudes dropped quickly. Bye the second meeting they had decided to give him a full IEP with para and full diabilty bus services. My son can go to school with what time hes comfortable. He can be in regular class or he has a hot pass that he can pick up and walk out of the class and so to a sensory room or a resourse room. His work is 1/2 of normal for his grade but 2/3s of the time he will do all the work. His biggest issue is hi anxiety. We have tried and tried but still are unsuccessful in dealing with that. I can not beleave the diffrence that it has made in his life though that the school has a whole new outlook on Austism. Hes actually looking forward to 4th grade because he got to spend the last 3 days of school helping his 4th grade teacher clean her classroom for summer. So he knows her and knows he likes and can depend on her..

Lana - posted on 05/26/2010

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My son is older than most of your children. But all I can say is repeat, repeat repeat!! And throw that IEP in their faces!!

My son is a senior this year. He has about a week before graduation. I have gone rounds with his Algebra 2 teacher for almost a month. He can get all the answers right but he doesn't show the work. Finally got the teacher to agree since it is on his IEP that he can do the a reduced amount as long as he showed the work.(Usually it is a third but my son wanted to show him that he could do it and did half of the problems!). The teacher said that he wouldn't learn it if he didn't write it down. Heck in class, he has the answer from his head before the class can get out of the calculator.
Finally, a few of my son's classmates decided that he was going to pass this class if it killed him. So he worked on it with them for about 5 hours straight. He turned it in on Monday and today he got it back with a note telling him to "finish!!"I called the teacher up and asked him if he remembered our conversation and he barely did. I reminded him that my son did have a IEP and he did. SO tomorrow it goes back and get re-corrected. And now maybe his grade will be high enough to graduate!!
Don't give up and keep fighting for your child. You are his biggest fan and advocate. I know I have been for 14 years and he is planning on college. That's is a whole new ball of wax....

Aimee - posted on 05/18/2010

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I don't think there's enough education provided to the educators regarding autism/special needs. Yes, we want to work on the handwriting...yes, we'd like for him to be in "regular" classes, but no, that's not where HE needs to be to excel. My son is just 6 and finishing up Kindergarten, he's diagnosed PDD-nos. We tried the "regular" classroom to start the school year, and within the first month everyone was miserable...Isaac, me, his teachers, everyone. Tantrums at dropoff, behavior problems at school, etc. We moved him to the Spectrum class in another school within the district where he has a smaller group of students and sensory supports, and he as thrived! He has a teacher who is teaching him above his grade level when he shows interest and ability (he doing basic addition in K, his typical peers aren't being introduced to addition yet) We've been blessed with great teachers and para's who understand that it's not all about the academics where autism is concerned-most autistic children are extremely bright!-but that it's the social/behavioral/sensory issues that are the most difficult to overcome. What about the school's special needs/special populations coordinator...can s/he help advocate for your son with the teachers? This person should be the one to help educate these teachers regarding your son's needs. Good luck!

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Julie - posted on 06/07/2010

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I jsut wanted to say that our son is 9 w/ severe autism (since age 2 )and yeah there are times where we try to keep him quiet like in church etc. and going into 4th grade there are certain expectations but when he's with us he carries around books all the time, he loves video tapes and pretty much anything electronic
I do understand wanting him to fit in and be as normal as possible but what worries me is you can't expect him to be anything but autistic maybe a coathanger is his comfort item (an item that autistics use to help them re-focus/make sense of things/has a calming effect on him). You seem to be looking for answers (to explain why he plays with/has something) from him that a typical child would be able to give; I learned that relating to my/our son means going into his world, understanding him the way he sees things because he can't come into the 'normal world' as easily....
he makes noises in church, he doesn't speak well so during worship time/singing we clap hands with him....I'll tap on his leg....swing his arms (like a band director) anything to help him get involved w/ music because he CAN'T sing like our other 2 kids can. Our son plays t-ball even though he's 9 and 125#; (we coach and most of our team is half his height and only 3,4-6 yrs. old) but because this is something he likes and he'll not be able to play other sports he has permission to play as long as he wants to... as long as he tries to be 'typical' when he CAN allow him to be who he is if carrying around toothpicks makes him happy who cares why autistc kids are awesome and can do amazing things....God beautifully createdthem as all kids are!! God bless

Deb - posted on 06/06/2010

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Hang in there mama. Even your well trained special education teachers are required to push for a less expensive program or risk upsetting there bosses who primarily answer to the taxpayers that don't want to spend anymore income on property taxes. Yes many teachers need some ed. but even those who have it can't always say what they think or do what they know.

Lana - posted on 06/05/2010

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Your School district or your Autism Specialist should access to an Alpha Smart. James used a slant board for a while then the Alpha Smart but he didn't like being different than the rest of the class. He also tried Dragon ? which he used in Jr High but they never got it transferred over to the High School.it was a voice recognition program that typed out what he said. BUT it took almost 3 weeks to get to understand James, before he could actually use it. Also check in OASIS too.

Karen - posted on 06/04/2010

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Thanks everyone for the GREAT advice and I'm looking into the alphasmart as I type. I REALLY appriciate it...

Aimee - posted on 05/30/2010

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Lana, I am so sorry to hear the troubles you've had with your son's school! I haven't been at this that long-my son's just finished Kindergarten. But, we've been blessed so far with a great group/ARD team. I was reluctant to move him at first, thinking that all he needed was a dedicated aide, but I'm so glad I did. I don't know what to expect when we move from TX to SC, but I know that it's not always going to be as good as it is here. Will take the advice to heart, and will certainly not let the school push him around. His K and Spectrum teachers have put together a THICK folder of his work to show what he can do, and have included assessments of readiness for 1st grade. We've even heard from actual teachers how they can sometimes get caught in the middle-they agree with the parents but fear losing their jobs going against the administration. They've come to our support group meetings to talk to parents about how to advocate for our children...it was at one of these meetings that I learned about the program at MSU. Good luck!

Erin - posted on 05/30/2010

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My sons's handwriting is completely unreadable. Before his diagnosis, I had teacher's telling me it was laziness, and I began to believe it. This year, he had a great teacher who had done special ed for years, and realized right away that it was not laziness. She began to scribe for him, and gave him an Alpha Smart (which is a little word processer/keyboard). He's on the wait list now for a laptop, and will use it for the rest of his school career. His IEP says NO HANDWRITTEN work - even for math. Hopefully your child's school can provide him with some assistance similar to what my son is receiving.

Lana - posted on 05/29/2010

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Aimee, I live in Eastern Oregon. And my son is not the first aspie to go thru this school system. Last year they decided that he really didn't have autism and he had a writing disorder.HIS Autism specialist had seen him in the same classroom with the same teacher (Science) for 4 years. Didn't think that he has been with the same kids and teachers his whole High School career. I did but I am the over protective mom. Finally one teacher brought up haw he has issues when she works with him. She was told to NEVER speak in a IEP conference again by the prinicpal of the school. I made them leave that he has Asperger's on his IEP but they have fought me left right and center. But that's ok because my son knows he is in the right and that "some of the Staff need to take their dealing with disabilities class over," plus they are just stupid because "I don't play sports!"
There are several colleges around the State that are set up for autistic kids in fact my son's science teacher had a college all lined up and so did his art teacher.. They both took the time to talk to him and see that he ia a wonderfully smart kid with a few issues. Both these teachers for the past 2 years have been his calm down rooms when he starts to melt down.

Aimee - posted on 05/27/2010

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Lana, where are you? I ask because a university here in Wichita Falls, TX (Midwestern State University) has a social support program specially designed for autistic students, it may be worth looking into...?

Karen - posted on 05/22/2010

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AHHHHHHHH TY A voice in the storm!! I know I could not do what his teachers do and normally I am not so frustrated I just had three teachers call that week-so I made them do another IEP meeting and we'll re-adjust

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