Barium enama and breastfeeding, do they mix?

Stephanie - posted on 12/08/2011 ( 30 moms have responded )

42

0

6

Due to a family history of cancer, I am taking steps to see if I have any urgent issues to resolve, and part of the process is to have a barium enema.

I am wondering if I should breastfeed as normal, or pump and dump, and use previously pumped milk to feed my daughter?

Additionally, if I am advised to pump and dump, how long after should I pump and dump before resuming breastfeeding?

Any feedback is appreciated, links too!

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Celeste - posted on 12/21/2011

3,072

30

874

If she's getting plenty of diapers, you're good! She's not starving, as evidenced by her diapers. When she's fussy, do you nurse her or do you give her a bottle?

Milk is made as baby is nursing. Think of breasts as factories, not storage units.

No, no back tracking. You WANT her to nurse every hour. This will help supply.

Are you scheduling feedings? You WANT her to nurse often. The more you nurse, the more you will make.

Christyanna - posted on 12/09/2011

20

8

4

Im familiar with the procedure and it will not effect your mulk. However, I would warn you that you may need to be close to a restroom when nursing for the next couple hrs after the procedure.

Sally - posted on 12/09/2011

963

14

9

When I had to drink barium for a scan, the doctors told me it wouldn't hurt my nursling. It didn't do anything to her that I could tell.

30 Comments

View replies by

Stephanie - posted on 12/27/2011

42

0

6

At this time I'm happy to say that my production is up (unknown if it was where it once was, but I'm no longer frustrated) and apparently the barium enema triggered something else that also had its hand in a low in milk supply ("Mother Nature"). I thank everyone for the input and suggestions.

The lactation consultant advised that I nurse as if my daughter were going through a growth spurt and to nurse on both sides during the feeding session.

Celeste - posted on 12/24/2011

3,072

30

874

Angela-pump output is not indicative of supply. The best way to determine low supply is if baby isn't getting enough diapers. Having said that, your pump output is normal, which is 1/2 to 2 oz total.

Angela - posted on 12/24/2011

50

0

3

I have really low milk supply. It got to where I could only pump 1/2 ounce at a time. I've been using breastea from http://www.breastea.com and I can't say enough good things about this product. If you need to increase milk supply, I would recommend trying it.

Christyanna - posted on 12/22/2011

20

8

4

You can get the brewer's yeast from a health food store. I know when I checked into it, it looked a lot like a can of formula.

Lyssa - posted on 12/22/2011

314

42

35

good, as long as you continue with a healthy calorie intake, a lot of good fluid intake, you will be fine! even try pumping between feedings. this will help increase your milk production as well. sounds like you're a great mommy doing the right things for your baby! cheers to you, not many people are "terriffic" moms in my book! and good luck with your test results when you get them!

Lyssa - posted on 12/22/2011

314

42

35

oh and i also hope you're still taking your prenatal vitamin. that helps as well!

Stephanie - posted on 12/22/2011

42

0

6

I have heard about drinking beer, but I'm not a beer drinker, and I've heard that it works with other alcoholic beverages due to drinking more water after the alcoholic beverage. Unfortunately (or fortunately- depending on how you look at it), we are not big drinkers, and I haven't had an alcoholic beverage since the honeymoon (Oct '10- yes my daughter is a honeymoon baby).

At this time I'm still taking in lots of fluids and eating healthy foods/snacks, while waiting to hear back from a lactation consultant.

Lyssa - posted on 12/22/2011

314

42

35

and please check with your ob, midwife or lactation consultant before using whoever's post it was about drinking beer to increase production. ANYTHING you ingest orally or sublingually will enter your breastmilk. many at different rates and different qhantities, but as a nurse and a mother of 2, you better check with a professional about how much BEER you should drink while breastfeeding. it's all about staying hydrated, and good calorie intake to increase milk production. if you have healthy calorie intake you will burn more than you take in making your milk and lose weight while still increasing your milk production.

Christyanna - posted on 12/21/2011

20

8

4

Beer helped me with my production. It's the yeast 1 beer can't be light, has to ne regular. The liquor will not enter the milk if you only drink 1. It's a quick fix with long term effects.

Stephanie - posted on 12/21/2011

42

0

6

I'll give your suggestions a whirl and see how they go. Thanks for the info!

Celeste - posted on 12/21/2011

3,072

30

874

And it also sounds like she might have a bit of nipple preference. Nipple preference is when a baby prefers the faster flow of a bottle. Nursing on the breast is a different suck..

Celeste - posted on 12/21/2011

3,072

30

874

She's trying to increase your supply. Milk *IS* there. One thing you can do is breast compressions.

Sorry, I'm thinking of another mom whose baby was 2 months..

Stephanie - posted on 12/21/2011

42

0

6

My concern with having her nurse again, is that if she is not staying latched while nursing, then she isn't getting any milk, thus a bottle is needed. My daughter will be 5 months old next week.

Celeste - posted on 12/21/2011

3,072

30

874

OK, instead of giving a bottle, nurse her again. Again, having recently pumped doesn't have an impact on nursing at the breast. In fact, you'll make more!



Schedules aren't a really good idea. 2 month old babies NEED to nurse every 2 hours (even more often as it's a prime time for a growth spurt). Right now, it's imperative to nurse often because this will help supply in the long term as well.



Honestly, I'd ditch the bottles for now and nurse on cue. THAT will help supply.

Stephanie - posted on 12/21/2011

42

0

6

I nurse first when she is fussy (hungry), if after nursing she is still fussy (with knowledge that I had recently pumped), and she isn't dirty, then I'll give her a bottle.

I was trying to get her on a feeding schedule with more than 2 hrs between feedings so that I would be able to do things around the house. I'm glad to know "back tracking" is not an issue.

Stephanie - posted on 12/21/2011

42

0

6

She still has wet diapers, and her bms are all but predictable. Seeing how I had the procedure done on Monday, I think I need to see how things go, but I'm not letting her starve. After I pump in the morning, whatever amount above 5oz, I keep in the fridge, just in case she is fussy after her next feeding, which can be anywhere between 2.5-3 hrs.

To me, yesterday was the worst, because I knew when I tried to feed her, I didn't have enough because I had just finished pumping about an hour prior. Not to mention she was tired but more hungry than tired.

Also, I'm afraid of "back tracking." My daughter has been sleeping though the nights since about 2.5 months, so I'm not worried about that, but I'm more worried about feeding her every hour or every two hours, because if I go back to that previous habit, I fear that I'll have issues getting her to go back to an almost every 3 hr feeding. Or am I just nuts and there isn't any "back tracking."

Celeste - posted on 12/21/2011

3,072

30

874

How are diapers? That's the best way to determine if she's getting enough.

The best way to increase is to nurse. Nurse and nurse some more.

Stephanie - posted on 12/21/2011

42

0

6

Well here's an update to the procedure. My husband discussed what we thought would be best for all of us. I ended up having to take Magnesium Citrate the day before the procedure, and prior to taking it, I fed my daughter. After that we used milk that I had previously pumped and froze. I pumped and dumped milk after taking the Magnesium Citrate, and continued to pump and dump the next day. I resumed bf'ing the day after the procedure.

My husband had concerns as to what the Magnesium Citrate may do, as research we had done indicated that there may be a negative impact on our daughter, although extensive testing had not been completed. So we were playing it safe.

Now, my current issue that I am dealing with post-procedure is a major reduction in milk supply. I needed to follow a restrictive diet the day before the procedure, and this did include a limited amount of fluids, and the day of the procedure I was not to have any fluids/food until it was completed. I ensured that I drank min 64 oz of water/fluids, and I raided our fridge to "restore" my body's nutrition.

At this point to help increase milk supply, I am pumping after bf'ing, drinking lots of fluids (90 oz of water/day), and ensuring a proper diet. I have feelings that I am not producing enough, and it is devastating to feel this way.

I know I need to give my body a little time to get back to where it was before, but I feel like my daughter is "suffering" from my inability to produce enough milk. I'm supplementing her diet with reserved milk, only if she seems to be really fussy after I feed her.

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms