Breastfeeding becoming extinct?????

Anastasia - posted on 07/08/2009 ( 31 moms have responded )

175

13

16

So, recently an elderly relative died and lots of relatives turned up for the funeral and stayed in the area for a couple of days... my son is 8 months and every one of the ladies asked me if I was still breastfeeding him and were really taken aback and surprised when I said yes proudly.

At the time it didn't bother me, but me and my aunt got talking and realised both of us had friends that were puzzled that we had breastfeed for more than the first few months, because they had only bf 4 that long, if at all. And neighbours and friends neighbours are also bfing limited. And where I live, in 2008 they cracked down formula feeding and will not give information about it anymore unless you speciffically ask for it and for some 'explain' why...I've also heard that bottlefeeding was very popular in the 60s?!?

Has it really gotten that bad that formula is the norm and people think breastfeeding is strange and out-dated, to me it's perfectly normal and I just can't understand why so many people seem to have this opinion...

plus I've noticed that the men I've been around have VERY STRONG opinions on breastfeeding and are usually for it and are very proud of themselves if they were breastfeed

These are just my slightly random thoughts...please add to them and share yours if you have an opinion.

31 Comments

View replies by

Ania - posted on 01/29/2011

703

25

62

I think only in the US people have such strong opinions on that subject. I come from Poland, aand no one is suprised when you BF a baby for more than a year. They do some combined BF with formula, but women BF for a long time and there is no issue if baby doesn't sleep through the night, there are no issues with cosleeping and sensitive subject like that. Everyone does what is best for them and I never experienced a judgment. Of course I can only tell how it is in the environment I come from in Poland. (not in the entire country, but the town and people I know)

Donna - posted on 01/29/2011

657

16

39

most of the people that i know formula fed their kids. I did formula with my older 2. but with my youngest I'm still breastfeeding. I'm kinda embarrassed to admit it mostly b/c shes a yr old and refuses to wean, and i read stopping cold turkey could lead to a breast infection and that it should be gradual

Mary Renee - posted on 01/29/2011

831

16

33

I live in Hawaii and all the mothers in my Stroller Strides Group Breastfeed, or tried to breastfeed and are breastfeeding and supplementing. I personally chose to exclusively breastfeed and had four lactation consultants come to me in the mommy/baby care room to teach me how to get the baby to latch on, see how I was doing, encourage me to breast feed...



Then due to elevated bilirubin levels my daughter had to stay in the hospital an extra night. I didn't want to leave the hospital and I wanted to stay in the waiting room so I could nurse her but they wouldn't let me. I stayed till midnight nursing her until they made me leave and I told them I would come back at 6am the next morning to nurse. When I came back at 6 she was being fed a bottle of formula! I was pissed. Luckily though she's 8 months old and that's the ONLY formula she's EVER had.



Then my pediatrician tried to get me to feed her formula when she was a month old because she only gained a pound and a half (her father and I are both small people...she was totally fine!) I refused to supplement. Then my ob/gyn prescribed me estrogen due to birth control side effects. I told him I was concerned because I heard that it can decrease your milk supply. He just said "Oh, no it doesn't you don't have to worry about that" even though all the independent research I have done says that it does!!!! I feel that besides the lactation consultants I have gotten very little encouragement or respect for my decision to breastfeed from the medical community!



I've also had family members tell me to go ahead and formula feed so that I can get a "break" (my mom tells me this, even though she EBF me and my sister till we were 6 months, and continued to breastfeed us in the morning and at night until 1) and my boyfriend wants me to fomula feed because he's jealous that he doesn't have breasts and he can't feed her (Are you kidding!? I would have loved for him to breastfeed her- especially in those first 8 week!)



That said, I find a lot of support from other nursing mothers. One time I had to stop into a Payless Shoes Store to breastfeed because it was too hot outside and I was hiding in the aisles since I wasn't going to buy anything and I had all these female employees come up to me and tell me how proud they were that I was breastfeeding and how good it was to see a young mom breastfeeding (I'm 24, but look 16) and ask if I wanted any water or another chair or anything!!!!



I just find strength in my own desire to breastfeed. Honestly, I didn't know all the ins and outs of breastfeeding until I was pregnant so I can't blame other people for being ignorant about it.



Also, I'll totally be a little bitch about it and breastfeed in public all over the place, won't use a cover if I'm outdoors at the park or a beach, breastfeed in line at the pharmacy, hahaha. I lead my own personal breastfeeding rebellion to try to normalize it for any other moms, moms-to-be, or even the next generation of nursing mothers.



GO BOOBY MILK!!!!! My daughter loves it!

Mandi - posted on 07/12/2009

51

33

3

My whole family breastfeeds, my mother and all of my sisters. It has never been an issue. My baby was born early and had a hard time latching and didnt have a strong suck. So I pumped and used a nipple shield. It took a long time to get him to feed without tubes and the shield but it was worth it. I noticed with a group of my friends that they believe that breast milk is only good for the baby until 6 months. I don't know where they got this information but it is a little disheartening to me because that is just not true. I also have a friend who had a full term baby, she tried breastfeeding once at the hospital and then stopped because she says she didn't have any milk (and she complains about how expensive formula is). I find that really sad that the nurses didn't orient her better or even offer her a breast pump. I didn't have any milk either and my colostrum took a day to come out but I kept pumping and within a week I had too much milk. Education and encouragement is key in my opinion.

Amy - posted on 07/12/2009

4

9

0

Where I live there is a lot of support for breastfeeding moms. The hospital that I gave birth in is a "baby friendly" hospital, which encourages rooming in to start out a healthy breastfeeding relationship. A lactation consultant was there every day I was in the hospital to make sure we were doing alright and to help us out with any problems we were having. The hospital also offers a weekly breastfeeding support group at no charge.

My friends and family have all been very supportive of my decision to breastfeed. When I go over to my parent's house, I routinely feed my daughter around my two younger brothers, which I think is important because it normalizes it for them.The older of the two is still a little embarrassed around it, but my youngest brother will sit around and have long conversations with me while I'm feeding her. My best friend is a mom of 3 who breastfed all of her children for almost a year, so I get a lot of support and help from her.My pediatrician's office is also very supportive. All the doctors subscribe to the "Breast is best" way of thinking, and there are 2 lactation consultants on staff who are both wonderful. This network of support has been integral to the success I have had with breastfeeding, and I hope there will come a time that every woman will have access to that kind of support.

Jillian - posted on 07/12/2009

211

17

25

hardly any of my friends that have had babies had/are breastfeeding, and it makes me feel proud that i am able to and have stuck to it and not given up. the funny thing is that the main reason i chose to bf is because it is free, and i didn't want to have to go on WIC to be able to afford formula as a stay-at-home military wife, cost-effectiveness is very important, but the best part of bfing is the bond and how natural it feels most of the time now, it was really hard at first, especially with limited support, as i said most of my friends formula fed and my mother lives 11 hours away. luckily my mother always was willing to talk to me on the phone and encourage and support me. anyway despite my ramblings my point is i am very proud to be a breastfeeding mother!!

Crystal - posted on 07/11/2009

26

11

1

I'm breast feeding my daughter, my mother breastfed me & my husbands mom breast fed all 3 of her kids. however my grandma did not breast feed any of her 4 kid (all born after 65) At family get togethers at grandma's house I was asked to feed in a spare bedroom, this made me very upset. I found more family noticed that we were "missing" then would ask wheres Crystal & Andréa? They would get the response "oh she's feeding Andréa" finally by christmas I had enough everyone was busy talking and such that I just grabbed a blanket, covered us up & fed her right there in the living room, no one noticed. now no one says anything, they understand that its a beautiful ,natural thing to do. I think if people have no clue about BFing they are not helpful and almost make you feel bad over it. My mom would always breastfeed in private. not me, anytime anywhere! we were at a resturant this one time and she made a comment about me feeding at the table. I said did you see my nipple? she said no, I said oh can you see anything ? she said no? I said OK then just watch mom, see if anyone knows what I'm doing....the waiter came with our drinks , took our order and nothing, If I'm comfortable with it then shouldn't you be? she was surprised & then proud of me.

however I found most people helpful & now that I'm breastfeeding I notice more & more Moms doing it! I do think that lots of moms are just more private over breastfeeding (like my mom) we have great groups & breastfeeding clinics here in Ontario Canada, alot of our malls have the breastfeeding rooms etc. I also think breastfeeding depends on moms age. anyways I've rambled on enough!

Meg - posted on 07/10/2009

74

24

11

I think BF is on the rebound. As people become better educated about the benefits, they become more determined to see their babies get breastmilk. My grandmother didn't BF at all, my mom BF'd her kids for a few months, and I BF'd my daughter for a little over 2 years.

It does depend somewhat on where you live and who is in your circle of acquaintances, also.

BF was almost extinct in the US 50 years ago, but now women are BF more and more. Unfortunately it can be hard to find help with BF (most of us have had little or no experience of watching others BF prior to having our own babies) and some women give it when they find it's not easy to get started.

Also, women don't get good maternity leave in the US so that makes it harder to BF long term.

Chantal - posted on 07/10/2009

3

0

0

Hi Anastasia
Well I am from South Africa and I breastfed my first child for 16 months and now I have my second child whom I am still breastfeeding and she is 14 months and many moms i know breastfeed so no i don't think that bf has become extinct I just think people are pathetic if they think bf is dumb or outdated cause then God should be outdated too cause he gave us Boobs for this purpose so I mean honestly it is so much cheaper and healthier why not bf? don't listen to people who have an opinion on bf that don't even bf it is soooo lame you should do what is best for your child(ren) and for you :) keep on bf if you can just think of how much you save!

Kat - posted on 07/10/2009

727

16

45

I think BF is making a come back. I was not breastfed. My nephew is 22yr & he was bf & my sister bf all 4 of her kids. I am now bf my now 9m old & plan to until least 12 months. The Hospital where I had my daughter (Brisbane-Australia) is a part of a Organisation that is pro breastfeeding. If you are choosing to bottle/formula feed then you must bring your own as they will not supply. All the midwives are trained in breastfeeding to teach it to new mothers. They are actually quite aggressively pro breast feeding, which didn't affect me as I intended to bf, but I know I have had friends who have had unwanted pressure from this hospital. Our Mothers rooms are always busy with both bottle & breast fed babies.

Sally - posted on 07/10/2009

5

2

1

Good for you still breastfeeding. I stopped breastfeeding both of mine at about 20 weeks. This was due to different reasons. I am pro breastfeeding (although I did bottle as well after they stopped). I am starting a job in August which will help new mums with breastfeeding and hopefully I will get time while at work to go down to ante-natal clinic to promote breastfeeding.

Lisa - posted on 07/09/2009

29

14

3

I would like to think that breastfeeding isn't becoming extinct, but from what I see with my friends is that very few of them are breastfeeding at all or beyond a few months. I started with the thought of bf until my son was 6 months old. He's now 13 months and we're still going well. My husband is extremely supportive and I guess that his would be the only opinion that would have any influence over me. I returned to work when my son was 8 months and found that expressing at work was difficult, mainly due to lack of time. We tried him on formula at that stage to try and supplement his feeds but he never really took to it. I know we could have perservered but as I really dislike formula (I think it comes from my LOATHING of powdered milk in any shape or form!!) I gained access to an electric pump and began expressing again. I had been using a hand pump but was finding it hard to express enough milk that way. Now he is drinking some cow's milk i don't express anymore, rather I feed him morning, evening and night and he drinks cow's milk from a sippy cup during the day.

It seems to me (and this is my opinion only) that some women give up before even giving it a chance, or stop because of their percieved inconvenience that bf presents to them. I make these comments based on what some of my friends have said and their experiences and know that it is not a statement meant to cover everyone who does not breastfeed. I also believe that education (or lack of) about breastfeeding is issue that needs to be faced.

To Emily:
your post has made me feel so good. I cannot begin to imagine the difficulties you would have faced breastfeeding twins, I'm sure you have had many ups and downs yet here you are still going strong after 13 months. You are an inspiration!!

I just want to say "Yayy for breastfeeding!!" Thanks for reading my ramblings :)

Emily - posted on 07/09/2009

326

15

28

I think that there are more women bf in the beginning (first few months) BUT many stop after that. I think one of the reasons is many people go back to work before that 3 mo growth spurt and their bodies cannot keep up with the demand which leads to giving up. Another reason is that there is not a whole lot of info or support for women returning to work and how to continue bf. I have a close fried who returned to work just before her daughter turned 3 mo and as she weaned and pumped while she would be away her supply dwindled to nothing in a matter of a week. I did so much research for her to try and help her to work and bf and found very little information to support her.



When people are shocked that I am still nursing my 13 mo old twins I tell them that the whole reason I took off of work was so that I would be able to bf them so until I return (or longer if they still want to nurse in the am and pm) in September feeding them is my job. I don't really feel that people criticize me at all...they might be shocked that I am still nursing twins. Most are amazed at what I have done. I live in the New York Metropolitan area.

Lucy - posted on 07/09/2009

411

29

29

I live in the UK and am currently breastfeeding my 3month old. I don't know of any other mums who are breastfeeding and all my friends who have had babies recently are also bottle feeding! Luckily my partner and mum are very supportive (me and my sister were both breastfed until 2years old) however my partners side of the family are very unsupportive and condecending and make comments like, "you're STILL feeding her" she's only 3months old for god's sake, i can't wait for the comments if she's still feeding at 1,2, or 3 years old as i plan to BF for aslong as she wants it!

Hilary - posted on 07/08/2009

41

3

3

I think it is making a comeback - there are more and more studies showing the benefits of breastfeeding. I was fortunate that the hospital where I delivered offered classes prior to birth and had lactaction specialists that came and met with you in the hospital. I had always planned on breastfeeding - my Mom was a rarity not using formula for my brother and I ('68 & '70). I know some of my friends struggled with it so opted to take the class. I think that is one reason go to the bottle - breastfeeding is not as easy as some people make it out to be. Even though I had a lot of help with the lactation specialists I really struggled for weeks. Heck, we just graduated from using a shield at 41/2 months. So I yes, I considered throwing in the towel on numerous occasions and using formula, but here I am now approaching 6 months and just take it day to day.



Also wanted to point out that just because we don't see a ton of people breastfeeding in public doesn't mean that they aren't breastfeeding. I do not BF in public because it was too difficult. My little guy would take an hour to eat and juggling him, a shield, a coverup and a breast was too much. I either pumped ahead of time or gave him a formula bottle on the occasion that we were out when he needed to be fed. I consider myself lucky that he could transition between breast and bottle.



One last thought - I have been very lucky to be able to stay home with my baby. I lot of women wean when they return to work. As mentioned by other posts, that is something to be addressed in our society. I know if I returned to work, I would have had to pump in a public restroom or my car. There was no place made available to me and I would have likely switched to formula at that point.

Thank you to Anastasia for making us all think a bit more on this subject.

Johnny - posted on 07/08/2009

8,686

26

322

I think that a lot of it has to do with whether you grow up in a family that breastfeeds or not, as well as what is normal in the community that you live in.

While both of my grandmothers formula fed, my mother, both my aunts, and other extended female relatives have all breastfed. During the 70's, there was a bit of a "back to nature" movement (at least here on the west coast) that encouraged breastfeeding, and so like me, most of my cousins who are my age & younger were breastfed. So I saw it around me all of my life and just assumed that it was the normal way to feed a baby. I also babysat for breastfeeders, so I witnessed it outside the family.

Virtually all of my mommy friends have breastfed for at least 6 months. And only a few have weaned at that point. About 75% of the moms I know are planning to continue for at least 2 years. And when I'm out & about in my community, I rarely see a bottlefeeding mom.

But when I go to a mall in the suburbs, for some reason, I never see breastfeeding. The nursing rooms are always empty and everyone pushing a stroller seems to have a bottle propped. I have no idea why this is. Maybe people who go to malls don't breastfeed? LOL.

Sabrina - posted on 07/08/2009

349

11

61

I am happy that everyone in my family either BF or are very supportive. I use to work at Walmart and they were supportive too. All of my fellow coworkers were doing it too. But when it comes to formula it is nice that they are trying to make it as close to breastmilk as poosible for those who cant BF but it also detures others away from BFing because of it. Both of the hospitals I had my kids at were big on BFing.

Etta - posted on 07/08/2009

73

10

10

It seems like bf has been making a comeback in the last 10 years or so, but it is slow. And it does depend on the character of the place you live (if a natural way of life is strong in the community or not). A lot of people and pediatricians still think formula is the norm. I know our first doctor said he supported bfing, but when we had problems he immediately told us to supplement. It was only my stubbornness that kept us going and eventually got my son off formula. The doctor didn't allow for any learning curve and couldn't see why it was so important for me to bf.
I didn't have much support because I didn't know many people who successfully bf, and those I did know didn't live nearby. My mom was supportive, but couldn't offer advice because she had trouble bfing. Despite a bad latch (she didn't know any better), she continued bfing me through shear will.
Finding a good lactation consultant has made a big difference. Like my first baby, my second was slow starting out and it helped us so much to work with our lactation consultant. She also helped keep us grounded as our doctor stressed over the baby's slow weight gain. Even supportive doctors don't give you much time to start bfing well. Another good source of support is the local La Leche League. They usually have one meeting a month and you can always call them to talk and get advice over the phone.

Michele - posted on 07/08/2009

13

4

0

Quoting Shawn:

Honestly I think it depends on where you live. I was living on the west coast when I had my first. I was surrounded by a community of moms who wholeheartedly supported breastfeeding. They had feed ins to protest poor behavior on the part of government and business owners. They have worked to pass legislation to protect a nursing mother and try to get more rights for nursing mothers in the work place.

The American academy of pediatrics recommends we nurse our children for two years. I know a lot of ladies, as I am now nursing my second child, who were not able to nurse because of supply or latching on issues, so I think we need to be open minded about these things. One of them was able to pump for six months and bottle feed despite that.

I have also heard stories from several moms who sought help from lactation specialists who actually said things discouraging the mothers like... oh you are probably too old to be successful nursing [at 30]... oh, your flow just isn't good enough... Quite frankly I was very lucky with my first child to have found a wonderful lactation consultant who along with my stubborn determination got me through the first six weeks to 13 months of nursing.

Breastfeeding is one of the hardest and most rewarding things you will do as a mother of a new child and we need MORE support out in the world to increase our numbers of success and duration.

I am a working mother and have been lucky to have two employers that support breastfeeding. There needs to be more like them as well as a general mindset change so mothers can focus on doing what is best for their baby with out added stress and scrutiny!!


I live in Southern California and I have never seen another woman breastfeeding.  The bf room in our local mall is always empty, and I have always seen babies with bottles.  I was the first in my family to breastfeed, and even my aunt gave me funny looks when I was breastfeeding at the HOSPITAL...  I am just waiting for somebody to say something to me now that my baby is getting older.  I plan on self weaning, so this will be interesting since this isn't the norm around here.

[deleted account]

I live in Kansas, and recently I have read that KS has the lowest percentage of women BF after 6 months, something like that. But not in the women I know! I can't think of any of my friends who chose not to breastfeed (aside from a medical condition). My church is very family friendly, the pastor & his wife have 8 kids, and she even BF in church (covered up of course). So all us other mommies are quite comfortable with keeping our babies with us in church, and none of our friends without kids seem to have any issues with it either. If they work they pump and send it to the babysitter. But since I am a stay-at-home mom and my social life is pretty much just church and my own family now, I probably don't see an accurate percentage of the population around here.

It does seem to me that BF is getting a lot of support. My local WIC office touts it all over the place. The State of KS recently passed a bill clarifying that it is legal for a woman to BF anywhere she has the right to be (many states have done this).

And I know the men in my family are quite supportive of it too. My husband only asks that I stay covered up outside of home (which I would do even if he didn't care). I have never had anyone in public say anything to me about it...negative or positive. : )

I have one sis-in-law who pumps and puts it in a bottle all the time. I haven't asked her why she does this. But she has an insanely good supply up now, that's for sure!

[deleted account]

I would like to add that we as mothers who do nurse need to speak out for nursing rights in our community, and try to help educate others one mommy at a time. I have some great one on one conversations with other new mothers who wanted to quit or got frustrated or though... oh I made it through the first month, but it isn't worth it.... stand behind them and encourage them to keep at it without passing judgment... if they can get through the first 4 -6 weeks the baby will more than likely figure out the routine and do great. Word of mouth is a great way to spread the word about the benefits of feeding naturally.

Patricia - posted on 07/08/2009

12

9

2

I live on the west coast and most mothers do breastfeed their babies. I notice that some women don't do it because it's too hard and they don't want to try. I had a friend that gave the excuse that her breast were too big, other said that they tried, he did not latch correctly the first time so they quit, other quit after the go back to work. Also for some other people it means freedom, someone else can feed the baby. I had a really hard time at the beginning and I was ready to give up, but the lactation consultant gave me a shield and it made the difference and now I love to feed him.

Mel - posted on 07/08/2009

12

3

1

I haven't copped any negative feedback about breastfeeding, but if someone were to have a go at me, my response would be "Why would I pay for something that my body produces for free and is instantly available?" I love that I don't have to listen to a screaming baby in the middle of the night whilst preparing/heating formula. My son is 6 months old at the moment and I am planning on letting him feed for as long as he wants.

I have two young half sisters that I recently went to visit. I breastfed in front of them and the whole family had quite a few conversations about breastfeeding. As I said to Dad, it's good for them to see it because it normalises breastfeeding for them. The older of my half sisters was only breastfed for a couple of months because Dad's wife was told that her weight gains were inadequate and that she had a low supply. It was only once Dad and his wife had my younger half sister that she realised that the problem with the first had been an attachment issue. My younger half sister was breastfed for about 16 months. There have been many times while I have been feeding my son that Dad tells my sisters about how the younger one was breastfed and how much she loved having a feed, or either Dad or his wife will tell a funny story about something that happened while my sister was being fed.

As far as covering up while feeding goes, I don't normally do it, I just try to be discrete. I did go through a phase for a couple of months where I had to in public because my son would become too distracted by what was going on around him to concentrate on feeding. Even at home, the only place where he would feed without getting distracted was in my bedroon.

Vicki - posted on 07/08/2009

675

30

112

Breastfeeing is definitely making a comeback, albeit slowly. Many people do still find it offensive though it is the most natural thing you can do for a baby! The most difficult part, I've been told and seen to be true, is that you don't SEE a lot of mothers breastfeeding anymore. Outside of North America, communities of moms will breastfeed openly and it is never questionned. Children see it and can ask questions. Expecting mothers are shown how it is done. While I was pregnant I attended a breastfeeding clinic run by the health unit. The nurse did say how unfortunate it is that mothers don't know anymore how to breastfeed and are being pressured by big companies to use formula. It's really important to have that support, someone who can help improve the baby's latch or positioning, and just to encourage the mother while adjusting to her newborn.

[deleted account]

My mom was born in 1960 and she was bottlefed. She said that if you could afford formula then you bought it to show that you had the money to. I was determined to breastfeed because I know that's what's best for my baby and I'm glad that I'm doing it. Honestly I don't care what other people say because I'm doing something good for my baby.

Kayleigh - posted on 07/08/2009

91

27

12

I've noticed the exact same thing, I love breastfeeding and plan to breastfeed for 1 year. Its so natural, I was hoping with all the other concern for natural things coming back breastfeeding would too. Many people are using natural products in thier household. Feeding natural home made baby food, and still no breastfeeding. What is it that people dont understand Formula = Constipation, Colic, Empty Wallets, and an unhealthy baby. I would always do the best for my baby and thats breastfeeding

User - posted on 07/08/2009

54

11

8

I do feel like as a mom who breast fed and will breast feed again that there are many people who are uncomfortable with the thought or don't see the point in it. God made our bodies to produce milk to feed our children. I am not against bottle feeding/formula, but for me it is not an option. I nursed my son for 13 months and when people hear that most of the time I get weird looks. For me I just wish that everyone could respect other peoples choices when it comes to how to feed their children and not be so weirded out by breast feeding. It is really sad when other mothers stare and are whispering while you nurse your child in public completely covered up and all. That makes me the most upset.



I am blessed though that our hospital is pro-breastfeeding and do everything they can to help you while you are in the hospital. I had some of the best nurses and a wonderful lactation consultant as well. Our pediatrician is also pro breastfeeding and was always supportive even when my son was in the lower weight range. I am very thankful for that!

Lori - posted on 07/08/2009

195

1

15

I think that actually breastfeeding may be making a comeback in recent years, even though it still has far to go. My mom had her first baby in 1960, and she said that she had to really fight her doctor on the subject of BF - he was very against it, but she felt it was the right, natural, thing, and luckily stuck to her guns...and switched doctors! We (six of us) were all breastfed because of her stubborn nature. But it was rather uncommon at that time, since formula was the trend. (At least in the U.S. - I don't know about other countries.) And of course, back then, scientists/doctors had no idea how much better BF was for the baby.

It does depend on the area you live in, and how common it is in that community, but I think overall western society has started to "get it" that formula is not the miracle food it was originally thought to be. It seems to me that starting in the era post WWII, America got a little obsessed with new advances in science & technology. That was the era that people thought it was great to spray DDT everywhere, and when the suburban love affair with artificially green, pristine, pesticide-loaded front lawns started up. Processed foods, preservatives, sprawling suburbs...all sorts of things popped up around that time. The same kind of scientific over-kill happened to childbirth too - if you see/read about early hospital practices for women in labor...makes you shudder.

So I hope that it continues to improve, but I do think that more and more people are coming back to it. It's hard because that long era of formula fed babies means that many women do not have other experienced women in their community/family who breastfed before them, for *good* advice and support. But the more moms choose to BF now, the more moms in the future will have that support when it is their turn.

Dana - posted on 07/08/2009

11,264

35

495

When formula came out it was said to be better than breastmilk. Breastfeeding was considered the old and outdated way of things. Since many older people grew up with way of thought, they still stick with it. Thank God things are turning around, I just wish it were a little quicker. I just tallked to a friend of ours who has his first grandchild, I asked him if she was nursing the baby. He replied that she was formula feeding and acted as if she was b/c that's what's best. Sad.

[deleted account]

Honestly I think it depends on where you live. I was living on the west coast when I had my first. I was surrounded by a community of moms who wholeheartedly supported breastfeeding. They had feed ins to protest poor behavior on the part of government and business owners. They have worked to pass legislation to protect a nursing mother and try to get more rights for nursing mothers in the work place.



The American academy of pediatrics recommends we nurse our children for two years. I know a lot of ladies, as I am now nursing my second child, who were not able to nurse because of supply or latching on issues, so I think we need to be open minded about these things. One of them was able to pump for six months and bottle feed despite that.



I have also heard stories from several moms who sought help from lactation specialists who actually said things discouraging the mothers like... oh you are probably too old to be successful nursing [at 30]... oh, your flow just isn't good enough... Quite frankly I was very lucky with my first child to have found a wonderful lactation consultant who along with my stubborn determination got me through the first six weeks to 13 months of nursing.



Breastfeeding is one of the hardest and most rewarding things you will do as a mother of a new child and we need MORE support out in the world to increase our numbers of success and duration.



I am a working mother and have been lucky to have two employers that support breastfeeding. There needs to be more like them as well as a general mindset change so mothers can focus on doing what is best for their baby with out added stress and scrutiny!!

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms