Help I am producing too much and can't stop.

Jaime - posted on 03/22/2009 ( 24 moms have responded )

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I just gave birth to my daughter on the 13th. My milk came in on Tues and it is Saturday and I can pump over 10oz. I have tried to go as long as I can without pumping but I am in physical pain!! My daughter will only drink about 1 oz maybe 2 oz...the Doc told me she will catch up but what do I do in the mean time. I wake her up to feed her every 3 hours as she will just sleep her life away.



I don't want to get a cloged duct yet I don't want my milk to dry up. This did not happen in the beginning with my son in fact I could hardly get any milk, yet towards the end I could produce 10oz but that was after nursing for a year! Any suggestions???!!

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Lin - posted on 06/04/2014

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I also had the same problem. I was an overproducer and had over active let down. The two usually goes together. I begun to worry that I would never stop producing milk ( I know, silly to think now). However from day 3 till 4 months, I would get completely engorged and have to pump or feed my baby every 3 hours. I would get so incredibly uncomfortable, I was able to pump 6-8 oz every 2-3 hours. I had tried to not pump and suffered clogged ducts and nipple blisters every day. To relieve the plugged ducts, I would take hot showers and massage the painful ducts. A thought ran across my head, to not pump so I wouldn't stimulate milk production but this was a bad idea as I got mastitis twice and had to be placed on antibiotics which then caused me to suffer from 2 months of yeast! But that's another topic. The lactation specialists had recommended me to feed on demand and to pump every 3 hours until my hormones settle in and I would produce the right amount of milk. It was either that or suffer mastitis and yeast all over again. They said this would occur by the 3rd month, glad to say that by the 4 and 1/2 month, my milk finally slowed down and now I can go 6-8 hours before feeling a bit uncomfortable. I also recommend slowly stretching the pump every few weeks. For example I would slowly start pumping every 4 hours for 2-3 weeks and then try 5 hours next. As long as I didn't get a plugged duct that day or week, I would slowly taper off. Being an overproducer is not fun as some people may think. I couldn't leave home
because we just had too many accidents ( milk all over my shirt, baby, etc) or I would need to relieve myself every 3 hours, I had to plan my life around my breasts. I hope this helps someone out there.

Allison - posted on 03/22/2009

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When you're uncomfortable and baby doesn't want to nurse at that time, go ahead and pump...but just pump enough to let out the pressure. Don't pump until the breast is completely empty. You want to avoid signalling your body to make *more* milk, and pumping all the milk out makes your body think you need all that and more. So, maybe just pump a couple minutes per side for a little while.

You may also want to try getting her to nurse every 2 hours during the day if you can. This is more the typical amount of time for a newborn to go when breastfeeding. If she can nurse more frequently but take less per feeding, it'll signal your body to slow down the production a bit.

There are several other things you can do to help with over-supply (also called OALD if the problem is related to an Over-Active Let-Down). I'd highly recommend you take a look at the kellymom website for more information as well as support from their forums (the moderators are very knowledgeable about breastfeeding).

Congrats on your newborn!

Emily - posted on 03/22/2009

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Ccongratulations on the new baby! You sound just like me when my kids were newborns. If you are in physical pain, I suggest pumping as much as you feel necessary to be comfortable and continue to wake her up and feed her atleast every threehours. Gradulaly it will slow down and you can stop pumping, but for now keep yourself comfortable! There is such a thing as having an oversupply -but let me stress- I think it is too early to determine this. If later you feel you are still having the same problem I would suggest that you pump first and then feed her so she gets enough hindmilk.

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Jennifer - posted on 03/23/2009

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I had this same problem.  I would pump just enough so that I wasn't in pain and then right before he would nurse so he could get a better latch.  I then froze what I pumped and when I went back to work I had a supply already stored up. 

Jen - posted on 03/23/2009

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You ladies are great! I love to read posts that are right-I am a second time breastfeeder and there is nothing worse than getting advice or answers that are not right! I love this app!

Revel - posted on 03/23/2009

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Well I have a lot of milk also!!!! My youngest is 3mo old and when he was first born my milk came in within days. PUMP PUMP PUMP!!!! Freez it!!! get frezzer pumping bags and store it!! It last for a while. Until about 3 weeks ago I always had to pump 2x in the middle of the night. And yes you DO NOT want to get a cloged duct b/c then you could get a breast infection and I have had many..and it hurts like he** and you get very sick.  Maybe shes not eating a lot b/c when you're so ingorged its hard for them to latch on and drink b/c the flow is so fast. So when youre not feeding and you feel it needs to be released pump. It will hopefuklly stop soon. good luck and take care. You and I are lucky we get that much, b/c some people I know pump for 30min and get like 2oz. :)

Jaime - posted on 03/23/2009

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Quoting Barbara:



I had this too, along with about a million clogged ducts and fever etc.  The only thing that worked for me was heat on the breast when we were nursing, and then ice right after we got done.  And pumping only in rare occasions when I just couldn't take it anymore.  Just keep at it!  It might take a while to work all the kinks out, but what's a few weeks of discomfort when it means so much to your child, right?  I remember the feeling of frustration when nothing seemed to be working and the problems kept persisting and growing,  but now after more than a year of nursing it really seems like it was no big deal.  I would do it all over again in a second.  You may want to punch me for saying this, but someday you WILL look back on these days and laugh. 






:-) You are right it is worth it!  Thanks for the encouragement!

Barbara - posted on 03/23/2009

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I had this too, along with about a million clogged ducts and fever etc.  The only thing that worked for me was heat on the breast when we were nursing, and then ice right after we got done.  And pumping only in rare occasions when I just couldn't take it anymore.  Just keep at it!  It might take a while to work all the kinks out, but what's a few weeks of discomfort when it means so much to your child, right?  I remember the feeling of frustration when nothing seemed to be working and the problems kept persisting and growing,  but now after more than a year of nursing it really seems like it was no big deal.  I would do it all over again in a second.  You may want to punch me for saying this, but someday you WILL look back on these days and laugh. 

Krystle - posted on 03/23/2009

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Everyone's pretty much said what I would've. I just want to say CONGRATS!!!! YAY!!!!!

Jaime - posted on 03/23/2009

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Thank you to all....I guess I have hyperlactation syndrome and a forceful let down...AKA "Super Boobs".  This is so frustrating.  I am a bit more educated now thank you!  She does have symptoms of  fussing, gagging, sputtering, and pulling off the nipple, also a lot of clicking.  And yes I can spray milk across the room.  I took off the pump and it shot like a super soaker. 



So here is what I have done thus far.  Express 1 oz before feeding her so she can latch on.  Elevating her and reclining so she does not choke as much.  Feeding on one side (Block Nursing) every three hours.  I have tried demand feeding but she sleeps all day long (and parties or screams like a rock star at night).  So I have kept with the every three hours, if I nurse her sooner she is only getting formilk and that is not good right??  I was given breast shields in the hospital but they have not done much I have not tried the nipple.  I have also tried the ice and that feels like heaven to my "hot" boobs.  I have stopped pumping except for the 1 oz and then in the evening just emptying them because they hurt so much so I give her that milk in a bottle and she will only drink 1 1/2 oz.



I am just so frustrated and in pain.  Thank you for the encouragement, I keep reminding myself that babies who are breastfed statistically have higher IQs right!!  I know it is best but I just pray that they will settle down.  Thanks to all any other suggestions keep them coming!!

[deleted account]

Quoting Chelsea:



Quoting Michalene:




I also had this problem, although not quite this bad.  I also feed on one side at a time, and I try to feed in a reclined position to slow the milk - my little girl had problems sucking with so much milk.  I would also recommend breast shields.  You can wear them when you are engorged and not feeding to ease the pain.  The allow enough milk out to ease the pain, and you can keep the milk to use later.  I got mine at Toys R Us and they work great! 








Good luck! 









Nipple Shields should not be used during nursing unless they are recommended by a LC because they can cause nipple confusion and you may never be able to nurse without them.  





Sorry, I meant breast shells, not shields.  They are not used during feeding, only to relieve the pain of sore nipples and engorgement.  They are not the same as nipple shields.



 

Chelseaszidik - posted on 03/23/2009

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Quoting Michalene:



I also had this problem, although not quite this bad.  I also feed on one side at a time, and I try to feed in a reclined position to slow the milk - my little girl had problems sucking with so much milk.  I would also recommend breast shields.  You can wear them when you are engorged and not feeding to ease the pain.  The allow enough milk out to ease the pain, and you can keep the milk to use later.  I got mine at Toys R Us and they work great! 






Good luck! 





Nipple Shields should not be used during nursing unless they are recommended by a LC because they can cause nipple confusion and you may never be able to nurse without them.  

[deleted account]

I also had this problem, although not quite this bad.  I also feed on one side at a time, and I try to feed in a reclined position to slow the milk - my little girl had problems sucking with so much milk.  I would also recommend breast shields.  You can wear them when you are engorged and not feeding to ease the pain.  The allow enough milk out to ease the pain, and you can keep the milk to use later.  I got mine at Toys R Us and they work great! 



Good luck! 

Hannah - posted on 03/23/2009

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My goodness! Super Mama! Well just keep pumping away and freezing the milk until they stop gettting SO engorged. It will taper off for sure. You can get cooling packs specifically for your breasts, they also help.  I was the same way, I have small breasts but holy crap I made a TON of milk!! I had to sleep with a absorbant pad undernieth me and I would soak through that thing in a matter of hours. It will taper off-be proud of your body!

[deleted account]

  Hi and congrats!   Too much milk at first can be pretty normal.  It takes about 6 weeks or so until your milk will begin to match what your baby is consuming.  An oversupply usually continues long after that point...I had this problem.   Something I did when my baby was brand new and I was sporting the Dolly Parton look, was applying a warm compress before pumping or hand expressing enough to make me comfortable.  This seemed to help keep my ducts open.



   For now, I would just continue pumping enough to make your breast soften up a bit and feed her on demand. If you continue to have just too much, I would reccomend block nursing which is feeding on one side, while pumping only enough to make yourself comfortable on the other until your supply is reduced.  If you are concerned you may have an oversupply, you may see signs such as your baby fussing, gagging, sputtering, pulling off and milk spraying further than an inch or two (wow, I really could have competed in a distance spraying competition if there were such a thing)  Of course I can laugh at it now, but at the time it was very frustrating. Too much milk can be a problem, but it is a good problem to have I suppose!  Have fun with your baby.

Jamie - posted on 03/23/2009

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Same thing happened to me.  My LC suggested I use one side for three hours and then the other for the next three.  So instead of always feeding from both sides, you just nurse on one.  Not sure if this will work for you, but it did it for me.  

Leslie - posted on 03/22/2009

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I just met a lady at my mommy meet and she had that problem and that she finally found a doctor who made her quite pumping as often because it was a food issue. She had to stop eating a lot of foods like chocolate, caffeine, (i am sorry to say that i don't remember any others because i was shocked by lack of ANY chocolate). The bigger issue for her was all the milk she produced was fore milk and no hind milk ever came. I will try to find her through the group and see if I can get more info.

Arwen - posted on 03/22/2009

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Congratulations =) Don't worry, your boobies will slow down. I'd also recommend on-demand nursing. That and lots of nursing pads for a few days. It'll get easier, and soon this will be a distant memory. Oh, and while you pump, store all of that milk in your freezer! You can save up for dinner and a movie. Grandma can babysit!

Dorothy - posted on 03/22/2009

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Pump and freeze .... I wish I could be so lucky ... my LO is 5 months and I can barely get 2 - 4oz at a time and she's drinking 5. Congrats btw!

Katie - posted on 03/22/2009

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I did this at the beggining too (although not THAT much milk :) and I would pump after I fed my dd. I also woke her up every 3 hours during the day to nurse and after a couple days my supply evened out and I wasn't producing too much. I say just get her to nurse as much as you can at each feeding then pump the rest out.  I say stick to your 3 hour schedule and your milk will slow down soon. :)

Jessie - posted on 03/22/2009

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Skip the pumping if you can and have a nice hot shower and just do a little hand compression to take a little off. Nurse on demand and your body will regulate to your baby's needs - your baby is the most effective pump. You can also do some gentle compressions on your breasts while your baby is nursing, make sure to compress all over, not just in one spot. It is pretty uncomfortable for a few days but I promise it gets better!

Chelseaszidik - posted on 03/22/2009

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This is very normal and the reason it's continuing is that you are pumping.  Breast-feeding is supply and demand.  It will be a few days of pain before your body only produces when your baby is hungry.  The best way to speed this up is to nurse her on demand.  If you're really in a lot of pain just pump 1oz off of each but beware that his could cause a letdown of more milk.

Holly - posted on 03/22/2009

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I agree with most of what was said so far. Check out Kellymom.com or talk to a Le Leche person. Pump (or hand pump) AS LITTLE AS POSSIBLE to relieve some of the pain. If you pump too much your body will never slow down because it thinks your baby is drinking that much. ...I had this problem and it causes a lot of problems for the baby as well as pain for you (look up overabundant milk supply if you want more details). It should take a couple days but it should get better. Other ways to help relieve pain are to take a warm shower and massage your breasts as well as stick a bag of frozen peas into your bra.

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