I am thinking about breastfeeding.

Sarah - posted on 08/03/2010 ( 132 moms have responded )

22

53

0

I am thinking about breastfeeding and wanted some advice from other moms. Has anyone relied just on pumping? Or did you do both? Or just feeding from your breasts? I need advice on how to go about this.

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Kirsten Veronica - posted on 08/04/2010

71

12

0

Sarah, if you go in with some good intentions (i.e. I really want to do this!) and make sure you listen to only the advice that actually makes sense to you, and get help, and more help, you should do just fine. Ask if the lactation consultant you get in the hospital is internationally board certified though because I've heard horror stories about LC's being just as stupid as can be. If you have any problems in the beginning, which is normal, you're exhausted and a new mommy and everyone is throwing "advice" at you...Find an LLL (La Leche League) leader/meeting. Or even go to the LLLI.org online forums and trust me, you CAN do it. A very very very small percentage of women have any physiological problems breastfeeding (2-3%) and most of those can be overcome with help. Most people fail at breastfeeding because they didn't have the appropriate support and didn't listen to their baby and their body.

It sounds like you are well on your way to a good start!

Jennifer - posted on 08/08/2010

3

13

0

I would highly recommend feeding at the breast. It's the greatest thing ever! At first I thought it would be weird, society makes you feel that way. But it couldn't be less weird! I would only recommend pumping if there is a latch problem (but continue trying at the breast! ) and for when you are away....other wise do it at the breast. It's so convenient and easy. This will bond you and your baby forever, and the feeling you get looking down at your baby while they nurse in priceless!

Lisa - posted on 08/07/2010

8

51

1

If you haven't, read "The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding" and check out Kellymom.com. I breastfed my daughter until she was 22 mos. and am breastfeeding my son, who's 8 weeks. I pumped when I went back to work to send breastmilk to daycare and nursed when we were home. I pumped until she was 10 months and hope to do the same this time. Pumping is a pain - but to get my kids used to a bottle, I started pumping once a day when they were 4 weeks old. My DH gives a dreamfeed between 10 pm and midnight so he gets time and I can go to bed and get 4 - 5 straight hours of sleep. If you do have pain, definitely get some gel pads. The Ameda ones you can use for up to 6 days. Put them in the fridge before you use them and rinse in cold water before re-using.

Rebecca - posted on 08/07/2010

94

21

1

I breastfed my youngest for 4 years and 5 months. Found out he has an allergy to dairy products early on so kept nursing him for as long as I could. I used a pump when away at conferences for work but all the rest of his nursing was at the breast. I teach women about breastfeeding at my local WIC office. Your WIC might have a simular program as the program has grown over the years across the country. My WIC office was the pilot for the program. Also look for La Leche League meetings in your area or breastfeeding support groups or your hospital might offer a breastfeeding class. Nursing at the breast is more efficient than using a pump but there are many moms that have had successful breastfeeding experiences with just using a pump. Adoptive moms manage to induce a milk supply this way. The most important things you need to know is LOTS of skin on skin contact with the baby from the very begining to keep up your prolactin level (hormone that tells your body to make milk) & ALL sucking needs should be at the breast for the first 8 weeks to ensure you will have a good milk supply established before introducing artificial nipples. I tell my moms even if you decide not to breastfeed PLEASE at least nurse your baby while at the hospital so your child recieves colostrum, which is the first milk you will produce (your mature milk will not come in until day 3-5). Colostrum is your childs first immunization, it helps pass the meconium (1st sticky poop) quickly to lower the amount of jaundice & it kick starts your childs brain etc to growing. Do not worry about baby starving while waiting for your milk to come in. Your baby will be recieving all it needs until then & has fat stored up to burn. Nursing is all about supply & demand so the more often & longer you nurse the more milk you will make. Congratulations on searching out information to give your baby the very best!

Teri - posted on 08/07/2010

130

9

4

I bf-d twins -- one ate at the boob and one didn't -- I pumped for 12.5 mos -- it was a necessary evil -- but it was brutal on me.. In order to maintain supply, you have to pump in the middle of the night every night. That meant that I got up at 3a and pumped for 12.5 mos.

Bf-ing babies directly si sooooo much easier and after the first few months they get so efficient they eat very fast. (usually) you can also co-sleep and you'll get lots of sleep.

This conversation has been closed to further comments

132 Comments

View replies by

Maureen - posted on 08/10/2010

4

6

0

My daughter is almost a year old and is still breastfeeding. I really enjoy the cuddling and it is very relaxing, as well. Hormones are released when you nurse that naturally calm you! This is so wonderful as a busy new mother. I nursed both of my children and all of my baby weight was gone by six weeks post partum. Pumping was not much of an issue for me, since Katalina refused to take a bottle. This was inconvienent, but I don't regret breastfeeding. She is definitely worth it! I attend a great breastfeeding support group at my local hospital. You should check around and see what classes they offer in your area. It is helpful if your husband/ significant other takes an informational class with you. Support is key!

Marie - posted on 08/10/2010

120

36

3

I breastfed exclusively...I had a little trouble getting 2 of my children to latch on, but in the end it worked out. If i couldn't feed from my breast I would definitely pump for as long as I could! Breastfeeding is definitely the way to go obviously with all the benifits, but also for the bonding as well. I love it!! I'm still BF'ing one of my 18 month old twins :)

Anna - posted on 08/10/2010

7

17

0

I tried it with my daughter for about 6 weeks and she would eat fine but I couldn't get anything out when I pumped. I'm very active in our church so sundays and wednesdays were more stressful for me bc I couldn't take any milk from home and I'm not the type to just throw a blanket over me and feed her. Then there were a couple of days that she was wantin to eat alot but nothin was coming out so we supplemented with formula then went to just formula. It was much easier for us both. Please don't let Dr.s and magazines make you feel guilty about not breastfeeding, bc they say they won't be as healthy. bologna. My daughter is 13 months and she's never had an ear infection or been really sick. She had a cold once about 6 months ago we've been really blessed. I know kids that were breastfed for 9+ months and they're sick all the time. Do what you feel like you need to do. I liked formula but a lot of people think that breastfeeding helps you bond with the baby. Try it and see what works for you. I will say it was nice to feel like she needed me and I was her nourishment. Good luck. Blessings

Katie - posted on 08/10/2010

339

16

50

I breastfeed my little girl who's 4 months old. I do pump once or twice a day to freeze milk in case of an emergency. It takes 2-3 days to get enough milk for a bottle though. She does get a bottle of expressed milk once or twice a week because I do volunteer work and we're in the car all morning. I would much rather breastfeed than give her a bottle. It's an amazing bonding experience. It does hurt at first though, however you just need to grin and bear it, and in a few months it won't hurt anymore. My little girls growing and getting little rolls. It makes me feel good that I gave her the nutrition to grow and not formula. I would DEFINATELY recommend breastfeeding. It's one of the best things you will ever do not to mention the best for your baby.

Sinead - posted on 08/10/2010

0

0

0

I was lucky enough not to have any problems with latching or milk supply. Think you need to relex and do what feels right for you not what you are told to do. I have breast feed for 8 mths now and the only word of advice i will gove you is when the little one hits 3 mths try getting used to expressed in bottle and dont feed to sleep after this time as this is when habbits are formed.
If for some reason you feel you cant dont stress its not the end of the world! Dont let anyone make you feel as though it is..
I will say it is a great bonding exprence but its not the only one and if you are bottle feeding your hubby (who may feel left out when bf) can bond with baby also..

Brandy - posted on 08/10/2010

117

25

9

From what I’ve read so far (not all of them b/c there are a lot) no one has listed the benefits of breastfeeding. So I am going to do that.
The main one is you recover so much faster.
You greatly reduce your risk of almost all forms of woman’s cancer (mainly breast cancer).
It’s free.
No tainted formula Mother Jones July 12, 2010
Your child has less of a problem with weight as they get older.
You return to your pre pregnancy size faster (I went from 163 at delivery to 130 2 weeks later, I weighed 140 when I got pregnant).
The poop doesn’t smell.
No constipation.
SIDS is reduced.
The bonding that takes place.
Less allergy problems, ear infections, and respiratory infections.
You can delay vaccines b/c the baby gets the antibodies you produced from your vaccines www.Mercola.com, www.askdrsears.com, www.naturalnews.com, and www.nvic.org
There are a lot more I’m just having a hard time thinking of them at 5:30 in am wile I can’t sleep b/c number 2 won’t stop kicking me and pressing on my bladder (only 5 weeks left).
If this is a boy a note of caution, they are more sensitive than you may think and than girls.
Also I went back to work part time after 3 months and had a really good pump. It just takes longer to get the same amount of milk when pumping.

Nicolette - posted on 08/10/2010

8

33

0

I breastfeed only, but I had really good nurses who helped me. Make sure that when baby is latched thst the bottom lip is out not tucked under as this is what causes the pain. Perserverance is the key. You will get people telling you that some women just can't feed but if you are positive and have the support you can do it. Contact La Leche League and they will be able to help you with all of your questions.

Lora - posted on 08/09/2010

12

6

0

I would have to say go into it with an open mind. Try it, exclusively breast feeding might work well for you and the baby (its readily available, always the right temperature, and easy once you both get the hang of it).
You might find pumping works better (it is twice the work though, you have to allow time to pump AND time to warm and bottle feed the expressed milk.)
Or you may find that just formula is best. (honestly as long as your baby is loved and has a full tummy, he/she will be happy.)
I say this from a professional stand point as well as a personal one. What works well for one person may not be what is best for you. So experiment and find what works out best.
I decided to try breast feeding with my son, he took to it right away, but I have a slight advantage as a maternity nurse I all ready knew lots of techniques and strategies. I personally do not believe in "nipple confusion" so from day 1 we did the good old 3 Bs.. Breast, Bottle, Binkey.
He nursed, if he still seemed hungry he got a bottle with formula, and if he just wanted to suck he got a pacifier. It worked for us, everyone was happy and he nursed for 8 months successfully. Until he discovered real foods and a sippy cup, then he lost interest and weened himself. He just did not want to sit still long enough to nurse since he had a sippy cup that could be on the go with him. I had hoped to nurse for a whole year or more.

So I say, give it a try, find out what works best for you and your baby, and don't stress over it. Nursing is awesome!!! BUT it should be a good experience for both mom and baby, there is no need to feel like a failure if things do not work out.

User - posted on 08/09/2010

4

0

0

It is important to remember that Breastfeeding should NEVER be painful..it will feel different, and maybe tender, but no hurt. If it does hurt, than the latch is wrong. It might take some work, but it also might not. both my boys latched right on with no problem! I was never sore, or bruised.
I also like to remided people that we have a super power..we created a human..of course you can feed it! Keep having faith in yourself and believe in your body..formula has only been around for 70 years...but people thousands!!
Good luck to you and your little one!!

Allison - posted on 08/09/2010

35

9

0

In the beginning, we had a hard time, it hurt, she would fall asleep, she wouldn't latch on well on the left, so I would pump, give it to her and keep trying. Would pump especially when they were just too sore!! I sometimes supplemented with formula too, just to make sure she was getting enough.
I went to see a lactation cons. for the left side issues, and we tried a bunch of things, finally, I just got tired of fighting with it and decided to nurse with my right side exclusively. It works just fine, demand and supply, so it makes enough to satisfy her. I pump at night to have some on hand to put in her pablum.
I had a friend who pumped and bottle fed exclusively (no formula) and she said it was exhausting. Whenever she wasn't feeding him, she was pretty much pumping. Breastfeeding is SO convenient! You don't have to think of packing anything when you go out, its easy in the middle of the night, and you can do it anywhere. I like the fact that she will take a bottle though, for those occasions when I need a break and someone else can feed her.

Alledra - posted on 08/09/2010

13

20

1

Don't believe what people tell you about exclusively pumping. A DOCTOR from children's hospital told me that pumping only was just as good as breastfeeding. Just make sure that you use a great pump like Medela. I more often than not just pumped. My milk supply was just fine. I just made sure to pump at least every three hours. Now my son would nurse sometimes at night. But he went through phases where he didn't. But like I said before A DOCTOR told me that and some breast milk is better than no breast milk if that's your choice. Oh yeah. When he was old enough to visit I would send formula to his granny's and he was fine with it. He had formula in the hospital for nine days and breast milk when I arrived to feed him. So don't let people tell you what's best for your baby. You make a choice that's ok with you and stick with it.

Diane - posted on 08/09/2010

293

0

1

Some people do rely completely on pumping but it is not nearly as effective as nursing, your supply will likely drop if you only pump, or at the very least it won't increase when you need it to. I would suggest reading 'The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding' it's a very good book and you can get it at the La Leche League website, I would also reccommend going to that website and looking for a local La Leche League leader and attending a meeting or a class about breastfeeding, it can be extremely informative and the most important things to remember are that it is completely worth it and you can definitly do it!

Alledra - posted on 08/09/2010

13

20

1

The best thing I evr done for my preterm son. He'll be one tommorrow. At first I just pumped then around about two months I nursed at night. I recently stopped nursing him at eleven months but he has not been sick with even a cold all year. I highly favor you try it and if it's not working then you can pump or bottle feed. But at least try.

Kirsty - posted on 08/09/2010

2

14

0

The best advice i ever got on breastfeeding was from my mum, "make sure you are relaxed when you begin feeding because if you are tense then your milk wont let down propperly and then it will become painful". Also make sure bubs is alway attached propperly, if it hurts then seek help!

Nicole - posted on 08/08/2010

8

22

1

Hi Sarah!
It is so wonderful that you are thinking about breastfeeding! I love it and did it with my now 3 year old son as well as currently with my 16 month old son. Breastfeeding is wonderful, can be challenging, rewarding, sometimes exhausting, amazing and occasionally painful. Having said that, please do try it. I had a very hard time with my first son and needed to use nipple shields for the first 2 months. He was breast and formula fed and he weaned at 9 months when he started getting teeth. Things were easier with my younger son since I knew what to expect, but I still needed nipple shields for the first month with him. My younger son has been exclusively breastfed, which at times felt like its own full-time job, particularly when he was in his first few months. I would suggest taking some breastfeeding classes or heading to a La Leche League meeting (or just find a great lactation station near you). I really thrived on knowing other moms who bf as it really is a something you want support for. And I have to say that if it doesn't work for you for WHATEVER reason, go with what works for you and your family. Breastfeeding is wonderful but can be incredibly challenging, especially when you are so exhausted you could just cry. If you can push through and keep going, then great, but motherhood is hard enough without having guilt over the great bf debate. Best of luck, and know that you have plenty of support here!!!

Lisa - posted on 08/08/2010

225

13

13

breastfeeding can hurt at the start, but the best way to fix it is to put a pacifier or bottle in their mouth and they will figure out where to put everything and will latch on correctly and it won't hurt after that. I'm nursing right now, my 7.5 mo old son. I've nursed three other children for two years each. I have them snuggled next to me at night, I love it. we are so close, weaning was easy, nursing is great. If you don't need to pump, then get a manual pump and use it to relieve the extra. Follow your instincts

Emily - posted on 08/08/2010

24

9

0

I am still feeding my 13-month-old son. He was not the easiest feeder at the beginning and didn't put on enough weight, so for a while I was breastfeeding him, pumping AND giving him formula! It took about three months for us to get the hang of it, but now we have a very close feeding relationship and he also eats vast amounts of solids. My advice is: even if not easy at the start, it is definitely worth persevering with breastfeeding. Pumps are slower but it helps if you think about your baby when using one. Also get support from either the Australian Breastfeeding Association (1300 mum2mum) or La Leche League

April - posted on 08/08/2010

3,420

16

263

20 months of nursing and still going until my son self-weans (the average world wide age is 4).

not everything was easy at first but as he got older, the more i learned and the more he learned.

i was never fond of pumping. i only pump if i am travelling because he won't nurse in public (yes babies can be shy!!)

Michelle - posted on 08/08/2010

79

23

0

Breastfeeding is much easier (once you get the hang of it) than pumping. Pumping can be slow, and then there is the hassle of sterilising the pump, bottles etc. Feeds are faster from a bottle, but we've been BF for 7 months and I wouldn't bottle feed if I could at all help it. But it depends on what you're lifestyle is - for some people bottle feeding is the best option, and feeding expressed breast milk, in my opinion, is better (and much cheaper) than formula.

Bonnie - posted on 08/08/2010

2

21

0

I fed mostly from breast but did pump a little as well! Breast is best and anyway that suits your schedule and needs is what you should go with. Everything is different for eveyone! If baby doesn't want the breast itself than pump and give a bottle to see if that works better for baby. If baby is happy with the breast you can pump and freeze, if you need to be away from baby for a short time, it's there to use. Any way you chose, good luck and enjoy every moment you have.

Jena - posted on 08/08/2010

8

8

2

I had a lot of pain at first with breast feeding (for about 2-3 weeks) and I still can't breastfeed on the left side for some reason (I've consulted with lactation consultants about it too, so I know it's not a latch problem.)
However, once you 'toughen up' it gets so much easier!!! Also, get some lanolin oil to put on your nipples, it will heal and moisturize them.
So, what I do now is breastfeeding on the right side and pump on the left side. I find that the time I spend breastfeeding Rowan is so rewarding, it is our best bonding time. I hope this advise helps. Just remember, do what you feel is best for yourself and your baby. :)

Tracy - posted on 08/08/2010

5

3

0

breast feeding is the best thing you can do for you and your baby. It is a little painful at first (because your nipple skin is getting used to the new sensation), but then you can't even feel it. It is much easier than bottle feeding because you don't have to worry about sterilizing, having all the parts, warming the formula,etc). It is also waaaaay cheaper (I read somewhere you save over $2,000 in formula costs!) Pumping is easy too. Nursing makes you closer to your baby. My favorite part was the empowerment I felt about doing the right thing and something that no one else could do but me:) Good luck! if you have any questions feel free to contact me @ tracykellogg@hotmaildotcom

Allie - posted on 08/08/2010

1

19

0

i was unable to breastfeed my first child, so when the second one came around i did my homework and prepared myself for it. the first month was the hardest but once my supply evened out and we got in to the hang of it, things have been smooth sailing. my daughter is now 6 months old and we are going strong. if you decide to do it, you have to have your mind right...all or nothing. if you think you'll give it a try then it just won't happen. you have to be dedicated. and the best thing you can do is as soon as you have your baby, nurse!!! while your in the hospital nurse as much and as often as you can. feel free to send me a msg if you want to know more i have become very passionate about this lol

Cherie - posted on 08/08/2010

58

29

4

I pumped right off the bat because my son was in the nicu- it helped my milk come in quickly, and a lot! when he came home, I had so much milk that I nursed him, and then pumped and froze it. He is now 8 1/2 months old, I just weaned him off the boob, but I still have a ton of frozen milk- so I will give him 1 bottle of breats milk a day till he's one.

This worked very well for me, and with my next I hope it will work out again. Remeber though that every baby and mommy is different, so just figure out what works best for you.

Michele - posted on 08/08/2010

5

18

0

i did both for both of my girls. For my first, I was in my final year of college, so i needed to be able to gone for a full school day student teaching. For my youngest, i am returning to work in a few weeks. I started freezing my milk about a month ago, and have quite a supply. Plus, its easier travel with a boobie bottle (my daughter is highly distractable and sometimes nursing in public is too much for her) and it also gives my husband and i the chance to leave her with our families for a night out. Establish breastfeeding before you introduce the bottle, thats the most important part. Its whats best for your baby, and you cant beat the bond it creates for you and baby. Good Luck!!

Jessica - posted on 08/08/2010

95

69

2

in the begining (1st 3 months or so) i pumped (1) bottle a day and breastfed the rest of the time. my hubby would give our son that (1) bottle during one of the night feedings so i could get some sleep. i LOVE le leche league as they've been super supportive along the way and there isn't anything they haven't heard of. i highly suggest getting their womanly art of breastfeeding book too!

Kelsey - posted on 08/08/2010

12

21

1

I breastfeed most of the time and pump enough for my fiancee to feed our son for the tew hours that I have to work a week.

Marla - posted on 08/08/2010

28

33

2

Do it! Breastfeeding is soo good for the baby. I pumped a bit with my son but I found it too much work for my daughter so I just breastfeed with her.

Tempestt - posted on 08/08/2010

29

16

0

I breastfeed with no pumping, everyone is different but the pumping is way to much for me. I don't have to pump because I am currently unemployed so it is amazing to breastfeed 24/7 I feel there is no bonding when you use a bottle :-) you should definitely try it, it is hard in the beginning but now my daughter is six months old and she's a pro :-) and a plus, since I've had her she's never been sick, plenty of anti-bodies in breast milk.

Lucy - posted on 08/08/2010

100

6

17

I agree, breastfeeding is great! The only trouble I had was the uncomfortable feeling when the milk first came in (but you get this even if you bottle feed and you don't get the great feeling of relief when the baby feeds!). Some women do have problems but these are talked about a lot more than the majority of us who have no real problems. Yes they do feed more often but that's because the milk is easily digested, both my babies sleep really well now. The first six months were tough, lots of night feeds but if you can do it lying down you can still rest! My son is now 2 1/2, i fed him for 9 months and he still sleeps through the night wonderfully. That bonding you get through breastfeeding gives them a great start.
Breastfeeding isn't 'best', it's natural and PERFECT for your baby. Don't let advertisers convince you a milk substitute can do the same job, it simply can't. Once your child is 1 they can have cows milk so there's no need for formula at all! This saves lots of money (that you'll need for all the other stuff kids need!).
Occasionally i feel annoyed that i can't go out for the day because my daughter won't have a bottle, but then i remember it's only for a year and that year goes so quickly (she's already 8 months)! She's on solids as well now, i can go out for the morning or afternoon after a feed and also she's sleeping well so I can go out in the evening. It's really not much to dedicate this time to your children and I know how sad i felt when my first weaned so I will carry on for as long as she wants!
I really hope you have a great experience and remember that the pain won't be worse than childbirth ;) xx

[deleted account]

My daughter had difficulty latching on. After several lactation consultants couldn't help I gave up trying and just fed her my expressed breast milk. Today she is 18 months old and I am still expressing and plan on continuing to until she is 2. I've never had a problem with supply and know other mums who exclusively pump without a problem as well. Good luck whatever you decide.

Rachel - posted on 08/07/2010

47

13

0

I do both! My daughter did not know how to suck when she was born so it took two long LONG months to teach her to suck, then latch with a nipple shield, then without the shield. Phew! I think it is totally worth it. It is an amazing experience. You milk is the best for your baby, and I actually have enjoyed the quiet time I get with my daughter when it is feeding time. I wouldnt have changed it for anything. I would encourage you to talk find a La Leche League around you or talk to the Lactation Specialists at your hospital. I talked with the Lactation Specialists and they helped me so- much. Good Luck on your decision. Ohh...I liked to do both because I could take a bottle when I knew I could not feed my daughter in public. I am a very conservative person and as totally support breastfeeding and dont mind it in public. It was just not my thing. Also, I could freeze it so if I needed to go somewhere quick I knew there would be milk :)

[deleted account]

Nursing is awesome! The first month will be a lot of adjustment for both you and baby but once you both get in the full swing of things it will be so GREAT! I nursed my son for 14 months. The first month I pumped and nursed him directly (combo). Then he had some reflux problems and I had to only pump (so I could thicken the feeds with cereal) for a month. I HATED pumping! It's more painful, takes longer, is not as efficient, and then you have to wash and sterilize pump parts AND bottles. Plus after your done with a pumping session you still have a hungry child to feed! Nursing directly from the breast was SO much easier and more enjoyable! I highly suggest it. If you have to pump while at work that is totally understandable but you can nurse directly when you are home. Once you try both for a little while you will begin to see why nursing directly from the breast is so much easier and more efficient. Nothing empties a boob like a baby! ;) Best of luck to you!

Alicia - posted on 08/07/2010

34

43

1

Hi Sarah,
I definately recommend breastfeeding - is such a beautiful time for mum and bub and it does not always hurt. With my first baby it took a bit of getting used to however it did not hurt and this time (second time around) it feels like my little girl has done this before...haha, she knows what she is doing and has never hurt. Not to mention, is so much, easy, cheaper, etc, etc than any other way (but even if it was not, I would still rather breastfeed just to experience that closeness between mother and baby). Oh...and if we did not do things because of the fear of 'pain' none of us would even 'have babies....lol you know they have to come out at some stage and you have to admit that labour does have a little bit of 'pain attached to it'....lol (and I bet you don't regret giving birth to your baby....so go ahead and try...what's the worse that can happen, at least you know you have tried then). Good luck...let us all know how you go :)

Elysia - posted on 08/07/2010

356

54

6

I only ever fed from the breast. The only time i ever expressed was when my son was starting on solid foods and i would express some milk to mix in the rice cereal. One of the best bits of advice i ever got was not to think that breast feeding is easy. Although its natural both you and bub need to learn how to do it. I must admit i was lucky and both my children took to the breast well. The first week your nipples can get really sore as they need to toughen up ensuring bub is attatched correctly does help. If you not sure the midwives are more than happy to help and show you correct attatchment and alternat ways of holding baby.

Kendra - posted on 08/07/2010

15

22

0

Boob all the way! I had a difficult time the first 6 weeks, my lo had a terrible time latching (my boobs are huge and add enough milk got triplets to that...) I was very milky, got mastitis 3 times and let me tell u the mastitis was hell! After that first couple months though, we became pros! The pain that your worrying about isn't really pain so much as a chapped feeling. Lanolin cream does wonders for that! And for trouble latching u can get a nipple shield that is a great help too.

Melissa - posted on 08/07/2010

234

13

33

depends on what you are most comfortable with and how well you baby takes to your breast. It is easier for me to just nurse but I do pump when I am away from my baby. try nursing as soon as you can after the birth to make it easier for both you and the baby. It takes a lot of work to breastfeed but it is totally worth it for both you and your baby, it is a learning process for the both of you. I read as much info as I could before starting to breastfeed and got help from the lactation consultant at the hospital. It is important to have some kind of support system and someone who you can go to, to ask questions when nursing. I started nursing knowing that I was doing the best thing for my baby. good luck!

Maria - posted on 08/07/2010

4

0

0

I exclusively breast fed my two boys. The older is now almost 6 years old and my baby boy is 4 months old. The older one was breast fed until 13 months old. It's very important not to supplement with formula, by doing that you are boycotting yourself. The first days baby newborn is placing orders and those orders will be delivered just in time and the right amount for his little tummy. Every two hours or so. Little by little time will space and you can sleep more time in between. Try to sleep when baby is sleeping. Do it! its important for the milk machine to have some body rest. The more you rest the more milk will let down.



It's great! The first 5 weeks are a little difficult for mommies to get used to the strong sucking and some nipple pain (Lansinoh and nipple shells are wonderful). After that time, more or less, the baby and you are in total sync. Whenever you feel like been to full you can pump it up and save it for later in case you have to do some errands and daddy can feed him or when you start giving him rice cereals.



It's very important to have a good pump (a good electric pump is better like medela or equivalent) You will feel so good feeding your little one, it's only natural (efficient and cheaper). Baby digestive system will thank you forever. Any questions Im more that glad to help. Enjoy!! they grow soooo fast!!

Christy - posted on 08/07/2010

3

5

0

the pain for me was not that bad...there...but not that bad. within a couple of weeks it was gone. it was 100% worth it for me. good luck.

Ash - posted on 08/07/2010

29

33

1

I do both. But only because I work. You'll never feel closer to your baby than you do when you are breastfeeding. When you start out you mainly need to just use the boobs because if you give the baby a bottle it can get nipple confusion and have a lot harding time latching on. So unless you are having issues in the first place with getting him to latch on then you just do the boob and trust me it is soooo much easier to just feed off the boob then to try to make a bottle. Because you CAN NOT heat your breastmilk up in the microwave because it kills all of the nutrients in the breastmilk and makes it pointless. So you have to heat it under hot water. I mean whats easier than pulling up your shirt and sticking your baby on your boob? Nothing! Not to mention the amazing health benefits for your baby and for you also!! It helps you lost your baby weight and does wonders for your baby!

Sarah - posted on 08/07/2010

97

6

3

I fed from just my breast but had to quit breastfeeding when he was only 3 months due to tummy troubles and we later found out I could have kept bf bc it was only acid reflux but we didn't know that at the time.

Sicily - posted on 08/07/2010

46

6

3

i breast fed till my son was 2 months old... then i got really sick and stayed in the hospital... i had to pump for him cuz i was unable to hold him to feed him. the pumpin was easier and faster... but the emotional attachment u get from breast feeding is unlike anything. i had to stop breast feeding permanantly because my body wouldnt produce the nutrients he needed to grow... he wouldnt gain weight or anything.. so if u do decide to breastfeed. make sure u watch your childs weight

Erin - posted on 08/07/2010

70

8

8

I had to pump for a month because my son was in the NICU. Once I went to a lactation consultant (one recommended by my doctor - NOT the ones in the hospital) I was able to actually start nursing my son correctly. I can say it will be both the most difficult and most rewarding thing that you can do. I think it would be very difficult to ONLY pump. Everyone who I know that has tried that has given up after a while. The bonding with your baby from Breastfeeding really helps you stick it out. I had to pump while at work once I went back, and that was no fun, I can't imagine pumping all the milk every single day. I really think that if you can breastfeed that you should for your health and especially the health of your baby. I also found it to be much more convenient. I never had to worry about packing formula when we went on a trip. Everything the baby needs is already right there.

Lisa - posted on 08/07/2010

2

4

0

I have breast fed my daughter since the day she was born and she is 8 months now, the first few days is very hard so please dont think its easy, however once your milk comes in I had no probs.
I fed on demand when she wants it its hers, I did try pumping but there is the issue of nipple v teet in the first few weeks it is better to stick with breast it help to latch on.

I wish you all the luck in the world with this it truly is the best thing I could have done not just health wise but the bonding you get with your child is priceless.

Cassie - posted on 08/07/2010

73

37

13

Im just fending from my breasts as my little girl wont have a bottle.. and i love it :) just depends on your baby wheter they will take a bottle & breast as my sisters little one has both boob and bottle, just depends on the baby.x

Valerie - posted on 08/07/2010

4

20

0

Breastfeeding from the breast is definitely best for you and baby. However breast milk whether straight from your breast, or from a bottle is going to be better than formula. It can be very difficult in the beginning, but don't give up. As the baby gets bigger, and you both get practice it will become second nature. Before your baby is born make sure you have a lactation consultant available. Most hospitals have them on hand to help while you're in the hospital. I definitely suggest to take advantage of it. I had a really really hard time the first 6 weeks, and had to do a combination of pumping and straight from breast. Now my son is almost 9 months old, and we've both become champs at breast feeding. Good luck!

Cheri - posted on 08/07/2010

23

38

1

Best Book I've found-Husband & wife/ Mom & Dad team Dr.Sears & Nurse Sears "The Breastfeeding book" This book was written perfectly and if you have ANY questions you will find the answer in this book! :)

Patrizia - posted on 08/07/2010

33

35

3

I was pumping at the begining and breast feeding, but pumping got annoying so I am just breastfeeding.

Keren - posted on 08/07/2010

21

22

2

I love breastfeeding. It was challenging at first because my baby had to learn how to breastfeed, and I had to learn how to help her. We stuck with it, even though she started on the bottle in the NICU, and within 2 months, she didn't need the nipple shield anymore. I work full time, so at 4 months, I went back to work and had to pump more. I fed her once in the morning, after work, and during the night until she stopped needing the nighttime feedings. My milk slowed down a little as she got older, and I stopped pumping around her 1st birthday. However, she is now 16 months and still breastfeeding in the morning and evening. It really is better for them and is so rewarding. Check out this article about how amazing breastmilk is!
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/03/scienc...

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms