Just took a breastfeeding class and I'm intimidated

Nicole - posted on 09/19/2009 ( 85 moms have responded )

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There was a lot of talk about nipple confusion, that pacifiers and bottles are a bad idea for the first month because your baby needs time to learn to be a good nurser. Plus all the technical aspects of latching and how to hold the baby. People have been breastfeeding for thousands of years right? Why does it seem so complicated? I really want to breastfeed but I'm feeling intimidated. I've always felt it didn't matter to me if the baby got a breast or the bottle as long as he was getting breastmilk, and since when can a pacifier "sabotage" nursing?

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Minnie - posted on 09/19/2009

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For me, it was second nature. Latch baby on, nurse when baby wants it. And I care for my babies like mothers do in traditional cultures. I don't agree with the theory that babies need to 'learn' to nurse. My babies are allowed to crawl to my breast themselves after birth and latch on.



It seems complicated because in our culture little girls don't grow up with mothers all around them nursing their infants and toddlers wherever they are. In traditional cultures, it's as second nature as putting one foot in front of the other to walk. They don't use schedules, pacifiers, bottles, pumps, they sleep with their infants and strap them to their bodies all day long.



But here in western culture most new mothers are first generation breastfeeders after the period in the 50-70s where breastfeeding was almost iradicated. No one has any visual experience or close women friends and relatives to go to for support. There's also an insane load of misinformation and myths surrounding breastfeeding, many of which are held even by people in health care.



Concerning bottles: you'll have to pump your milk to give baby a bottle. Pumps are not as efficient at stimulating and draining your breast as baby is. Over time, many women find that they just can't maintain an adequate supply from pumping. If baby is given too many bottles, he or she will come to expect the instantaneous gratification that he gets from a bottle, rather than having to work at your breast to elicit a letdown.



Pacifiers: Breastfeeding is a very important source of nutrition, fluids, immunities, and growth factors. When baby is sucking on a plastic plug, he's not getting that. There will be times when baby will want to nurse very very frequently, often several times an hour. During a time of growth spurt, if baby is given a pacifier, your breasts won't be stimulated to increase production to meet his increased needs.

Tricia - posted on 09/20/2009

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Wow long answers!

Here's a short one: If I tried to explain how to ride a bike without demonstrating or letting you try, it would seem complicated, right? BFing is a physical task. It's hard to explain. Once you've got baby in your hands, it's a lot easier to just demonstrate.

And also, talk to the hospital lactation consultant and go the la leche league after baby is born to trouble-shoot and get support.

Colleen - posted on 09/19/2009

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Don't panic :) A lot of the time breastfeeding is very simple and they give that info to new mums just in case there is a problem. I would suggest meeting some breastfeeding mums in your area and watching them feed, how they hold the baby and what a good latch looks like. Then when bubs arrives spend lots of time with skin on skin contact as soon after birth as possible to help the instincts, both yours and babys, to kick in.
Breastfeeding happens best when the mother is relaxed, so be aware of problems that might occur but don't stress about them until they happen, and they probably won't. Hope this helps.

Kristin - posted on 09/21/2009

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i also found that in the first few weeks the football hold was the best but as she got bigger the cross over is better

Lesley - posted on 09/20/2009

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I also forgot to mention, the lactation specialist I spoke with at the LeLeche League advised AGAINST pumping in the first 8 weeks at least! Your little one MUST feed as much as possible to build up your milk supply - this is the best way. And if you must pump, you are best to rent a hospital pump which is stronger than the ones we buy from the store. After 8 weeks, you should have built up a good milk supply and can use the standard pumps. You are best to check with your LeLeche League in your area - they are extremely helpful and full of information!! xox

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Danielle - posted on 09/26/2009

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dont worry seriously it just comes to you i never had a class and took it how it camenot ones did i bleed or get sore nipples or any of that i think that it is a natrual instink for you to no what to do when the time comes and enjoy it! i miss it so much and i feel that it makes you bond so much beter, its such an amazing feeling:)

Rachel - posted on 09/26/2009

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you will hear a lot of could happens at the end of the day there is no right and wrong way of doing things do what is right for you

Lindsay - posted on 09/25/2009

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We had some problems at first. Cole wasn't latching on and the first few days were very frustrating with every nurse telling me something different. I finally talked to the lactation consultant. We tried the nipple shield and sidelying and he was feeding in no time! We did have to supplement with formula for a few weeks because he had become jaundiced. My doctor told me that it was fine to use a bottle and we never had any nipple confusion.

Lyndie - posted on 09/25/2009

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Do not be intimidated!!! That is how I felt when I took the breatsfeeding class, but I was set on breast feeding my daughter until she was at least one year old!! Breast feeding is an amazing and natural thing. I have had no issues!

Amanda - posted on 09/25/2009

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I never took a class or anything before my son was born, and we didn't have any problems at all! My son was even a little premature, but it really was a natural thing for both of us! The best advice I could give you is to do what feels most comfortable for you and for your baby.
Don't worry about it :) Breastfeeding is really an amazing thing is shouldn't be something that intimidates you. Sometimes it can be hard to get the baby to latch correctly, and sometimes it can be a little painful for the first few days or so, but within no time you and your baby will be just fine.
My son took breast milk out of a bottle and from the breast, and we used a pacifier to calm him down. He has been very successfully breastfeeding for 5 months now.
Relax :) Everything is going to work out just fine!
Congratulations!

Kai - posted on 09/25/2009

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I just had my daughter on September 3rd. I breastfeed the whole time in the hospital. I purchased a breast pump before I delivered. When we got home, I started pumping and storing milk for when I went back to work. Within the first week home, one night I was too tired to hold our daughter for her to eat that her dad made a bottle out of breastmilk and fed it to her that way. She took it very well. However, after the first two bottles like that, she would not go back to the breast. We also gave her a pacifier when she was two weeks old cause NOTHING would get her to stop crying. She stopped.

Basically, if you plan on breast feeding - DO NOT introduce a bottle or pacifier as early as I did. Wait til the baby is good at nursing then introduce the bottle for one feeding and see how the baby takes to it. I would suggest this unless you plan on pumping and feeding breast milk solely through bottles like I do.

Jamie - posted on 09/25/2009

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Just relax. It was hard with Conner, but we made it work (used a nipple shield in the beginning) and after about the first few weeks or month, it was like nothing. With Madi, she latched on right away and did great! It is harder to maintain your milk supply by only pumping and putting it in a bottle, but it can be done. Straight from the source is by far the easiest way.

If you run in to trouble, just request a lactation consultant for help. You will do great!

Jan - posted on 09/25/2009

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Mumbo jumbo!! Dont read books by so~called experts. I breastfed all four of my babies & they all had pacifiers, they also had bottles for boiled water...my babies are now 14, 19, 23 & 24 yrs old!! Best of luck.x

Cecilia - posted on 09/25/2009

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It is easier to maintain supply if they are getting it straight from the tap which is why you may want to avoid the bottle as long as possible but it doesn't need to be that confusing. My daughter had a good latch from the beginning and so we felt comfortable introducing a pacifier at 1 and a half weeks.

Rita - posted on 09/25/2009

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Breastfeeding is a wonderful gift. Pacifiers will only interfer with nursinf if nursing is not going well. Get started as soon as possible after delivery and let the baby lead you to a good experience. Try to avoid too much seperation in the early hours after birth and keep the baby skin to skin they know what to do! Relax you are right breastfeeding has kept the human race going for millions of years so why not in 2009 and on?! Good Luck

Jessica - posted on 09/25/2009

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Even if you pump your breastmilk and put it in a bottle it is perfectly fine. I personally would recommend using both. My son is 6 months old and JUST started taking a bottle. and he dosen't take it very willingly either. I wish I would have introduced a bottle before 5 months [thats when we started trying] because you will NEVER get a break without worrying if your son/daughter refuses a bottle and won't eat from anything accept your breast.

As far as breastfeeding being "complicated". I disagree. It really isn't that hard. Babies were made to be breastfed and know how right from birth. Don't push it on your baby your baby will know what to do. I promise.

Emma - posted on 09/25/2009

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the tongue has to move in a different way to feed from a bottle or suck a dummy!

some new babys dont always understand the feeling of hunger an will be happy to suck on a dummy most of the time an there for wont be getting enough milk!

with a bottle it is because it can confuse your body! every time your baby feeds it is sending signals to your body to produce more milk, and after a week to a month your body will understand the routine your baby required! expressing is only a faction as effective of getting milk than your baby is! so this is why they tell you to wait for a month!

i would say give it at least a week if you feel you are feeding baby effectively then you can try bottles and dummys if you wish! if not then wait untill it is!

Sarah - posted on 09/25/2009

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don't take too much notice - u will be fine and ask for help if you need it. my 3rd was in special baby unit for first 2 days and was bottle fed as i had a c section and i was warned of so called nipple confusion but he still latched on with effort. don't worry, parenting is very individual and u will find your own way.

Rikki Lee - posted on 09/24/2009

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It really depends on your baby. Both of my kids took to breastfeeding automatically & I gave them a pacifier while I was in the hospital. They never had any problem. You just have to try the different positions & find the best one for you & your baby. It's really not as difficult as some people make it out to be. I found that the best bottle for my kids was the Adiri bottle because they liked the shape the top is really like a boob & they can hold onto it. I didn't give my kids the bottle very often cuz I'm a stay @ home mom, but on the times I did they took to it fine.

Veronica - posted on 09/24/2009

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Wow! After reading this, I am so glad I never took a class on it! But I will tell you my experience thus far. I only had the lactation consultant at the hospital. Actually, I had 2 and they both said different things! I had flat nipples so they gave me a nipple shield to help my son latch on. Unfortunately, the most they told me about it was just stick it on. For the first month I had it on wrong apparently and my nipples became so sore that I didn't think I would be able to continue to breastfeed my son. Thankfully, I found some really great info online, found out what I was doing wrong, and corrected it. (As well has weaned my son off the nipple shield!) My son is 4.5 mo. old now and we are going strong on breatfeeding. He can go between me and a bottle without any problem and a pacifier hasn't effected his eating either!



The website that helped me so much is kellymom.com Its all about breastfeeding! good luck and don't sweat it, you'll be fine.

Andrea - posted on 09/24/2009

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i just went threw alot with my son, he was born at 9 1 a very big boy, by the 3rd day he wa 711, my milk did not come in and i had ne way of knowing, we then spent the next week tryin to breastfeed, he would latch on great one day and then the next day he wouldn't, and believe me it hurt alot. i felt like i was already a bad mom, my only job at that time was to make milk and feed my son. by the 4th day i had my let down, i was so happy that i cried. but by this time he was being feed by a tube that the taped to my nipple that would feed him. so we had to start all over again. it was long long road, i would cry for the first month at most of his feedings. i could have stopped, but i felt that i had gone through so much as it was that to stop now would have been pointless. i would nurse, pump, nurse pump. for the first 3 months thats all i did. it is a 2nd job next to new mom. you have to want to do it. my son is now 6 months and we are all doin great no pain, it has gotten eaiser. but it so worth it in the end. if i have to give you a suggestion, i just wanted to pump too but i enjoyed that time with him and also u will not make as much milk that way, your body needs the baby to tell it what to make and how much. i learned the hard way, i make just enough, no more i was never able to keep an extra supple for that reason. i do hope that all goes well for you. also remember every baby and mommy are different.

Donnel - posted on 09/24/2009

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I'm a new mom of a 4 month old baby girl! There truly is something SOOO amazing about breastfeeding- It's a bonding experience and precious time together that I can't even describe. Nursing is more than nurishment, it truly is comfort- and you don't have to ever take the time to prepare the bottle! I kinda thought the same as you, and it IS very hard at first- but HANG IN THERE- it's so worth it and a beautiful experience! Give yourself two months and you'll be an expert!!

Erika - posted on 09/24/2009

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i think the worst part for me was the engorgement..but it only lasts a couple days and there are many things you can do to help it. it was kinda hard at first to get her to latch on but there is always help and it got easier after a day or two. i really like it..its something that is just her and i..something that only her and i can do,,bonding for us. i really love it..having a lil trouble with getting enough milk but that happens and im doing things to help that too. its really not hard and doesnt really hurt. it kinda hurt at first but i got some stuff to put on my nipples to help them,,they cracked and bled a lil but it wasnt that bad. good luck..hope you choose to do it.

Jamie - posted on 09/24/2009

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I was so confused with my first baby but after the first few months breastfeeding becaomes natural to you. It can be very difficult at first and very time consuming, I know they say 15 minute feeding and you're like oh yeah great but at first feedings can take 45-minutes to an hour. DON'T let this scare you. Just sit back and relax and enjoy the bonding time with your baby. I've heard using a Soothie pacifier shouldn't cause nipple confusion and many hospitals are offering them now, they form the babies mouth the almost the same way a baby would to latch. Don't get disouraged! It's the best thign you could give your baby. Put it this way my two year old has never been sick, nothing more than the sniffles in the winter time. She is super smart a little advanced for her age. I could say a million things. Once you get started it's not bad at all. Hope this helps a little.

Stephanie - posted on 09/24/2009

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I feel the same way you do. Wonder if I will be doing everything correctly. But a nurse told me that has been in the OB/GYN for over 30 years said that a pacifier takes away the feeling of eating and it makes it harder for them to get full the next time you nurse. It takes away the feeling of the nipple cause we all know that a pacifier and the real thing are really different in feeling. But anyways, just go with your gut instinct.. Your baby will eat and be a good nurser. Have faith and i know you'll do great..

Melanie - posted on 09/24/2009

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I have breastfeed four girls and currently doing so. I feel like I have been for my whole life already. But I still had to have help with everyone of them the first few times. I asked for the consultant to come in a few times so that I could get it right this last time. I did not get sore nipples this time and the baby got it too. The nursery gave her a bottle without me knowing and she did have a day or so getting back to the breast. Made life a little difficult for then but she is doing great now at 5 months. I used a paci right from the beginning. Helps with the cries that are not necessary, just wanting to suck on something other than me.

Gelana - posted on 09/24/2009

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its really not as hard as they make it out to be. when you have your baby it should come natural to both of you. just tell the nurses if you do plan to breast feed that you are and not to give him/her a pacifier or a bottle and they will respect your wishes. if you find a comfortable position for the both of you, just let them eat. if you breast feed you and your baby have a better connection too

Jessica - posted on 09/24/2009

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im sure someone has answered your last question about the dummy being bad but ill answer it anyways just incase lol.. babies suck differently on a dummy than they would on a breast, same as the bottle.

Darci - posted on 09/23/2009

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My first (dd) was tongue-tied like her dad. The frenulum under her tongue was connected most of the length of her tongue which makes a good latch difficult, so the first 2 days were a challenge because of her latch. So, an ear, nose & throat specialist clipped her frenulum, and her latch improved instantly. My second (ds) also was tongue-tied, but they clipped his frenulum after the first 2 breastfeeding adventures. He nursed for about 16 months. My third (dd) was perfect from the first time at the breast and still is GREAT at 4 months old! I had c-sections with all three of my children, and I nursed them while I was lying down in the recovery room within an hour of their birth. Let your nurses know that you want to breastfeed, and they'll help to make it happen.

As mentioned before, the first 6-8 weeks are the most challenging, but it is so worth the challenging moments. Newborns feed frequently and have longer feedings than 2 month old babies do, but I try to imagine how many bottles I'd have to makes, warm and wash if I had been formula feeding. Breastmilk is always available, always sterile, perfect temperature, and contains the perfect nutritional benefits for your baby. With each child, I have been worried that maybe breastfeeding won't work for THIS one, but it always has worked wonderfully and I praise God for this. My first (dd) became what we called a "professional" - for most of her nursing days, she'd nurse for about 7 minutes and be full (about 3 minutes on each breast). However, when she was a newborn (remember, the challenging time), she nursed for about 30-45 minutes, and I thought it was never going to end. I'm glad I stuck with it because breastfeeding is the best! Good luck and just enjoy your moments with your baby... breastfeeding will work!

Lyndsy - posted on 09/23/2009

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I didn't take a class and when it came time to start the feedings...I felt like I could not find a comfortable position, I didn't know how to get the baby to latch, and I must have missed the memo about how much it would hurt to begin with! BUT- we are now almost 12 weeks in, and I am so glad that we stuck with it. It was frustrating at times, and I definitely cried a few times, but it was well worth it for my baby. It seemed to feel like the most unnatural of natural things at first. One thing that helped a lot was talking with the lactation consultant at the pediatrician's office. As far as getting the positions right- it seems to me that as long as you are both comfortable and baby is able to feed successfully- you are good to go. Pacifiers/bottles- We introduced a pacifier at 5 weeks and gave her the first bottle at 11 weeks.We chose a bottle that had the same nipple shape as the pacifier that our baby liked- she took to it no problem. I was told in the hospital that using the bottle before breastfeeding is well established can cause confusion.

Goundy - posted on 09/23/2009

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The babe will know what to do, you just have to give them a hand. Don't worry, just try to relax as much as you can. I do suggest getting a Boppy pillow, this will help you support the baby as you nurse. You can find them online, Baby's -R-Us, Kids- R- Us, and Walmart. Also pick up a tube of "Lanolina Laninosh". It is a tube of cream that is safe for you and the babe and it is for nursing mother, trust me, it is worth having! I get my at the Walmart her in town. It should be in t/ the bottles and other nursing needs. It runs about 7-8$ here.

If you have a L/C where you are delivering, ask them for their advice. The one that I helped me post delivery was wonderful and she had stopped in to check on me and my daughter several times to make sure all was going well and to give me advice.

Don't give up and try not to be afraid, I know better said then done, but been there done that. Give it a try, it really is the best for you and your babe.

Good Luck!

Brandy - posted on 09/23/2009

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I grew up with my mom breastfeeding my younger brother and sister and occasionally other peoples babies. So it was completely normal for me. I wanted to go to breastfeeding classes but I chose a hospital that was a 45 min drive from my house. The hospital that is close is not reliable for deliveries and to take a BF class there was at least $100 or more because I wasn't delivering there. I looked up the different holds on line and did some research. When I was in labor they discovered he had pooped before he came out (I don't know what the medical term is for this) . I was scared because they had to clear his lungs first and I didn't want that to interfere with breastfeeding. Even with that he had no problems latching. 2 days later when my milk came in he went 10hrs without eating and the staff was concerned. They ran some tests and checked his weight and he was fine. I finally asked for a pump and got it down enough to feed him. The Le Leach wanted me to get a pump because of all the milk I was producing so we got a Medela. My husband and I was planning on getting one anyway so he could help feed. We also did research on bottles and found the Adiri. This made it a lot easier to go places after the first month. My son had no problems with nipple confusion, but I solely breastfeed for the first month. He also had no interest in pacis, they would actually frustrate him and make him cry. He could never figure out why milk wouldn't come out of them. The Adiri is designed to work like a boob. They are a little more but my mom could tell he didn't like regular bottles when she watched him. Also don't get a nursing bra with wires they can cause you to get blocked. And if you are light skinned with light or red hair (naturally) then you might want to get a shield. My boobs hurt for the first month straight but I didn't give up. I am one of those wearied moms who is still breastfeeding her 15 month old son. I plan to start weaning at 18 months. Ultimately I had a good experience but I know it depends on your support system. Let family and friends know your choice on this and have them support you 100%, if they don't tell them to not say anything. That is the last thing you need when you are going through that much of a change.

Jamie - posted on 09/23/2009

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Don't worry Nicole breast feeding is natural. Don't let your nursing experience be difined by what a book says go with your natural motherly instincts.

[deleted account]

*Edit* I just reread and I think I misunderstood. YOu are in the breastfeeding module of the birthing class? I thought you were going to a breastfeeding group. My answer is still the same about finding the right support. Relax, keep trying and repositioning if need be, and if you have questions, contact a consultant or nurse to show you the different holds to find the proper fit for you two. I strongly encourage all moms, new or not, to go to a regular support group after the baby is born. You learn so much!

[deleted account]

I have heard that nipple confusion is bunk and that it is legit, both from nurses. Remember that even medical advice is still just advise. If you feel intimidated after going to class once or twice...you are in the wrong class. Groups are meant to be supportive of you and respectful of your opinions and your needs. I still try to go monthly, my daughter is almost 19 months old, more so to be supportive and show other mothers that there is more than one way to do things. Of course, the nurse running it is awesome.

We have had women with babies that were allergic to their milk and were bottle fed during group. We have had women who HAVE to use a nipple shield or have to supplement. We have had women for and against Fenugreek.

I was not able to BF for the better part of the first 3 weeks because my girl was in the NICU and then I struggled when I got home. After trial and error, she started nursing like a pro. The instinct is natural but the techniques are skills to be honed. Now that I talked your ear off, I hope something in all of this helps. Good luck, keep trying mama!

Lavinia - posted on 09/23/2009

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Hi Nicole,
From my experiance of breastfeeding 5, all children are dif,trust me. It was the most natural and easy thing to do. Now with twins Ican serious tell the diff. My twin girl took the breast first and then the hospital introduced the bottle, after that she was confused and kinda lazy. The bottle suction is so uch easier and makes them lazy. The breast on the other hand has to be stimulated and newborns can get lazy. Consult a leader from your Leche Leage in your area she will be the best to help and answer all your questions. Good luck and keep us postdated on your journey! Lavinia

Stacie - posted on 09/23/2009

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Oh, and we use a pacifier and it hasn't seemed to bother the breastfeeding a bit.

Stacie - posted on 09/23/2009

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I had a horrible time at the beginning of nursing. I always thought that it would be simple as well. Put the nipple in and let them eat right?! Nope. Why didn't someone tell me?! I ended up getting Mastitis and the infection was pretty bad. Also dealt with cracked nipples from him not latching on correctly. Ouch! My sincere encouragement to you, if you are able, go to a Lactation Consultant and have one on one time with her. That's what I did, and let me tell you...she made my world fulls of smiles and happiness once again! :) My little guy and I are on the same page and working together and it is a wonderful, beautiful experience to nurse him without any difficulties and to actually enjoy it. I hope this helps you!

Wendi - posted on 09/23/2009

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I've breast-fed four children. All of them had a pacifier from the start. All of them where born knowing exactly what to do with my nipple. The only thing is if they latch on before the nipple is all the way in their mouth it can make you a little sore. Just put your finger in the baby's mouth to break the suction and do it again. Don't stress, don't worry. Women did this long before there were lactation consultants. You'll be fine, and you will never regret it!

Lucy - posted on 09/23/2009

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It will all come to you, don't be afraid to ask for help though. You can't plan what will happen, my son wouldn't ever take a pacifier - he was breastfed and when i offered him the pacifier he would just spit it out!! You know that rubber just didn't taste good! Each child is different. I loved breastfeeding though, best thing i've ever done! xxx

Megan - posted on 09/22/2009

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for some people, it is a struggle....it is definitely a commitment.
Don't be afraid...in your classes they need to tell you all scenarios and how to expect the worst. Breastfeeding is the healthiest for your baby. It is surprising how natural it is to a newborn. I was nervous too, but have had 10 months of success. If you ever have questions or doubts, do NOT be afraid to ask questions. (we have professionals around here just waiting to answer them) There is never a dumb question...trust me everyone wonders about something.

oh, the nipple confusion....I've read that it is only an issue during the first few weeks.

Best of luck!

[deleted account]

honestly don't feel intimidated. my son was 5 weeks early and took to it very easily. he was also kept in nicu for the first couple of days and the nurses gave him a pacifier and he just loved it. it did not effect the breastfeeding at all and actually soothed him. he also took to a bottle easily as well. and that also did not effect his latch. every baby is different and so is every mom. everybody is going to tell you something different and you will find what works for you.

Christina - posted on 09/22/2009

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For me, my daughter knew what she wanted from day one. She was small when she was born (5lbs6oz) and the doctors said b/c she was so small that I should supplement breastfeeding and formula. When we tried to give her a bottle of formula she refused to eat it, and this is from day 1. There was never any discomfort or pain. It was like second nature to her. As far as holding the baby, if you can hold a football you can hold a nursing baby. The boppy pillows are great too they can just lay on those ass you feed them. After 10 months of practice my daughter doesn't even lay down and eat anymore she sometimes stands and has me roll on my side while I'm on the couch. Just so she can wet her whistle...lol.. In my experience breastmilk is the best milk. My daughter (Jalynn) has been walking since she was 7 months and said her first word at 7 months too. She has never been on formula and she is only nursing to go to sleep now. I'm not sure about the pacifier

User - posted on 09/22/2009

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Hold your baby in a position that works for you!

As for bottles in the first month babies can rejected the breast as it is easier for them to get the milk through a teat as they dont have to suck as hard to get it.

Pacifiers are discouraged for a variety of reasons, its a personal choice if you wish to use them. Pacifiers are often responsible for sleeping problems, speech delays and teeth formation later down the track.



Best advice if you are having trouble beginning breast feeding is to find a helpful midwife/ lactation consultant and stick to their advice!

Ruth - posted on 09/22/2009

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If your baby is small and/or early, there can be problems with breastfeeding in the beginning (my little one used a nipple shield most of the time until she was 6 or 7 months old, but now at 10, she won't have anything to do with it), but my personal favorite thing about breastfeeding was the enforced rest time--you have to sit there and feed the baby. You can't get up and clean or cook or DO stuff, and those frequent resting periods (frequently the two of us falling asleep) are very important in helping you get the rest you need right after the baby's born and your body is still recovering from either delivery or surgery (if you have a C-section). I don't think I stopped falling asleep while she was nursing (even during the day) until she was 3 or 4 months old. And even if you don't sleep, it still makes you stop and relax, and sometimes we need as much of that as we can get.

Jenny - posted on 09/22/2009

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i just had my breastfeeding class yesterday, so i know exactly what you mean! i was talking to my husband last night about it, and felt more overwhelmed explaining it than i did in class.
i think it's easy to get overwhelmed, but in the end, i think it also becomes second nature. i was talking to one of my moms today (i've got too many, and it's complicated), and she was talking about how her daughter didn't breastfeed, and so her grandson has had all kinds of problems, and her friend didn't breastfeed, and their baby was extremely underweight, but her son's wife is breastfeeding, and their daughter is SO much healthier and gaining the right weight, etc.
the way i see it, you're right -- people have been breastfeeding for centuries! i guess they just talk about things that make it more comfortable or accessible to baby, like the "right" way to latch on, etc. as for the pacifier, i've heard of nipple confusion, where the baby can't tell the difference between the pacifier and their mama, so sometimes they'll get used to the pacifier and not want mom anymore. i don't think it's very common, though.
all in all, i'd say take it easy, trust your body, trust the baby to know how to eat instinctively, and don't sweat it. i'm sure you'll do great!

Abbey - posted on 09/22/2009

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The best thing you can do is relax! I was very worried about giving my son a pacifier and was adiment that I was not going to give him one at all. When he was about 3 weeks old my husband gave him one and it has been great he has not had any confusion and nurses very well. Best Of Luck and Enjoy it!

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Just keep your baby in your room and nurse it EVERY time it wants to nurse..you'll both get the hang of it..I breast fed my older two with no trouble..and now I'm nursing twins who are nearly 6 months old and still going strong! No problem although I did have to learn the football hold to pull that off! I had every breast related problem known to man while nursing my oldest..and learned from it..and still persevered! You can too, it's what these darn things are meant to do! Don't worry..it'll be fine..use your common sense and don't go to anymore classes..call and ask a nurse or someone if you have questions..

Jessica - posted on 09/22/2009

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Don't be intimidated.I tell ya what if its something that's ment to be it will happen. I decided to brestfeed my little one and I still am almost a year later. It may take a few tries to get started( it took me a day and a 1/2 to get him to nurse) so keep at it if you want to brestfeed and I don't care what they tell ya even if that baby is latched on right it's going to hurt for the first few days at least but the pain will pass and its a great experience. PS my baby wont use a pacifire or a bottle he went straight to a sippy cup when he started to drink other then breastfeeding.

Briana - posted on 09/22/2009

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I personally breastfeed and I gave my daughter a paci the day we left the hospital. It was complicated sometimes at first because the latch is sometimes difficult but your baby will learn pretty quickly. And as for bottles. If you want to put some breastmilk in a bottle go ahead but why go through the hassle of pumping if you don't have to. Its take more than twice as long to do so because it takes longer to pump than it would to breastfeed because I found that letdown takes much longer. Also after all that you actually have to feed you child the bottle. lol. So anyways. I am now breastfeeding my second child and I am happy to say that it feels totally natural to breastfeed and is NOT complicated like they make it seem

Billie - posted on 09/22/2009

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Honestly I think people worry too much. My daughter used a pacifier from day 2 because she just had that sucking urge ALL the time and I breast fed for 6 months, pumping and using a bottle at times after 3 months because of school and it was fine. I had her off the bottle and pacifier just after a year and everything went well :)

Tara - posted on 09/22/2009

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I never took a class about breastfeeding, and in the hospital I got no help from the nurses!! Luckly I had absolutly no problems at all. Your gonna hear lots and lots of things, you may find some things helpful and some things not. When it comes down to it, its you and your baby. Its the best thing you can offer your baby, if you want to do it you wont give up. Ask questions, join a support group, whatever it takes. I really hope it works out for you. Please dont stress about it, good luck.

Sierra - posted on 09/22/2009

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for me breastfeeding was a struggle the first day. no one tells you that your baby will be tired and won't really eat the first day or two. so i thought something was wrong with her, but once got one she didn't want to come off. the first week or so are the hardest. if your baby doesn't latch on correctly then you could end up with cracked nipples and at first breastfeeding does hurt ( no one told me that, so i'm telling you), but once your baby has a good latch the pain will end. but you can do it. don't feel intimidated. just know that if you have pain then something isn't right, delatch and try to relatch. the first 2wks were the hardest for me, i almost gave up, but my daughter is now almost 5mths and i'm still going strong. and she's also been on bottles since her 2nd week and has had no nipple confusion. can't really comment on the pacifier cause i refuse to give her one. oh and pumping (if you plan to), use a lubricant(no on told me that either). the lube will prevent cracked nipples also. but i hope this helps some.

Jenny - posted on 09/22/2009

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I felt the same way! I think I may have read to much when I was pregnant and I was dreading what "could go wrong" but it turned out to be quite simple! The nurses in the hospital showed me a couple different ways to hold her while nursing and we just did what was comfortable for us. We gave her a pacifer when she was less than a week old and we gave her a bottle (of breast milk) when she was just 3 weeks old...no nipple confusion for this baby! One thing which made it easier was buying a nursing pillow...takes a lot of strain off of your muscles cuz baby just lays on the pillow which wraps around you while nursing, I got mine from Thyme maternity in the mall for less than 30 bucks! Good luck Nicole, I'm sure you'll be great and if you need support there is tons out there!

Keeley - posted on 09/22/2009

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i think the best advice is to stay calm your baby will do it eventually, and if it doesn't you will have tried, i have breastfed both my children but more through luck than anything, you will be tired enough without stressing about it, and in the end if you decide to bottle feed formula it isn't the end of the word plenty of women do and they wouldn't be allowed to make it and sell it if it was bad for them! with my first i stressed about how much she was getting so i expressed and bottle fed her all the time a little time consuming but it worked for us, with my second i didn't care and just fed him whenever he cried! do what works for you

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