Need help with breastfeeding

Vivien - posted on 12/28/2009 ( 81 moms have responded )

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My son is only a week old and I've been trying extremely hard to get him to breastfeed. However, he gets frustrated at the nipple and just cries. He's latched on a few times but I feel as though not enough milk is being dispensed to make him happy. Does anyone have any suggestions or ideas on how to get him to feed at the breast??? I'd like to go to the support groups at the hospital but my newborn can't leave the house for 30 days due to cultural beliefs.

Any help would be much appreciated.
Vivien

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Molly - posted on 01/03/2010

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You have to relax ; # 1. The second thing that I suggest is that you see if you can get a lactation consultant to come to your home. This might cost money, but it's not terribly bad and worth it inthe long-run. Make sure that you are nursing in a quiet room without a lot of people. So then you want to make sure that you first run your nipple accross his cheek and he should turn his mouth towards it and latch on. The latch should be strong with his bottom lip curled Down. If you see his jaw moving up and down, this is a good sign.If you use your finger and gently pull down his bottom lip a bit you should be able to see his tounge kind of curled around the nipple, and the entire areola should be in his mouoth (but if you have extra large areolas then it might not be completely covered by his mouth.) If you want to know if he is getting enough, then you should count his wet/dirty diapers. I think that at that age it's like 5 wet diapers a day at least and then at least a couple of poopy diapers. another thing is to not wait until hes hungry to nurse him. as soon as you see him rooting or putting his hands in his mouth, feed him. Good luck mommy, and the best help for breastfeeding on the web is Kellymom.com

Remember that it's diffucult for almost all women in the beginning, but like all good things in life, it takes dedication and determination.

Chelseaszidik - posted on 12/28/2009

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I would like to recommend having a La Leche League Leader come to your house. They are trained to help with issues such as these are a wonderful resource. They do house calls on a regular basis in most cases. Here is the link in order to find a LLL in your area

http://www.llli.org/WebUS.html

[deleted account]

You can call your local hospital and get the number for the lactation consultant. She may be able to help you over the phone. Try to make sure you offer the breast before he gets so hungry that he's crying. If my daughter did get to the cry stage, my husband would take her and walk around with her for a few minutes to calm her down. If he's only latched a couple times, are you giving a bottle? He may have nipple confusion. Stop the bottles and stick with the breast. If he's getting frustrated waiting for a letdown, you can pump or hand stimulate your breasts just enough to get a letdown and then latch him on.

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Bobbie Jo - posted on 06/30/2016

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Have you heard about Fenugreek? It will help boost your milk supply so that ultimately if you cant get him to latch, you can still give him breast milk. Also, when i was pregnant with my first, I would pump every 3 hours for 15 minutes. At first i didnt get the results i wanted but if you stay consistent with it you will have a built up supply in no time. I was able to receive some fenugreek products free to review from upspring and influenster, but all opinions on it are my own. Its worth a try! Good luck mama i hope you have luck and if you need more info im happy to help.

Melinda - posted on 01/07/2010

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i was having a hard time breastfeeding and my baby latching on when she came home from the hospital and my sister in law recommended using a nipple guard (which you can buy at target). it worked tremendously. at first she wouldnt do it but then i tried putting breast milk on the tip of it and she started eating. she is 2 months old now. good luck!

Monica - posted on 01/05/2010

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Please don't give up. It took my daughter 6 weeks to start latching properly and gaining weight. It was frustrating and very worrisome, but once she figured it out she went nuts! She is now a very healthy, happy little girl. Please consider getting help from a lactation consultant. They made all the difference with us - most importantly as our cheerleaders when I would get upset. They helped me to stay calm and gave me lots of ideas of things to try. They were with us every step of the way and shared our joy when she finally started gaining weight. Cecilia and I wish you all the best - we'll be praying for you and your son.

[deleted account]

Definately try the nipple sheild. We used it in the hospital and the first week home and it made all the difference for my daughter when it comes to latching. I also had no trouble weaning her off of it. Also...Mother's Milk tea can help you with milk production. I drink a glass everyday and it really helps. I really felt like my baby wasn't getting enough milk at first. Though you are more than likely producing fine...it's a nice peace of mind. You can get Mother's Milk at GNC. Try to pump between feedings as well...this will help keep you stimulated until your baby figures it out. Good luck and hang in there. It will be worth it in the end.

Brittany - posted on 01/03/2010

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u should breast feed for 10 - 15 min on one boob if they r sill hungry offer them the other but not all babies like the boob so pump n give the bottle bc my baby was opp. she didnt like the bottle so i had to breastfeed and try diff. positions the one mine only likes is lay on ur bed or coach if its big enough to where u both can lay on it bc idk if urs is as big as mine and lay on ur side and but ur baby on ur side to w.e boob ur putting them on and lay them on his side while putting a blanket behind is back to support him or lay on his back with his head facing ur boob with a slight slant and make sure u switch everytime they eat n they eat 8 12 times so dont worry if he hungry breatmilk digest in 30 min

Kristina - posted on 01/03/2010

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i used a shield for the first two weeks with my son and then a lactation consultant helped me get him in the right position and it is ok for them to scream it makes their mouths open wider to get the nipple in better. Remeber if u are frustrated so are they babies definately feed off of moms energy so good luck and try try again the baby will get the hang of it eventually

Kirstin - posted on 01/03/2010

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My suggestion, Just try... My son refused to nurse for the first 6 weeks of his life... Then when I was so frustrated and had decided to put him on formula I said Ok I'll try one more time and he just did it. I pumped for 6 weeks so he always got breast milk but every few days I would try to nurse him... and when he was ready he latched on and we have been nursing happily ever since. Dont stress Babies can sense whe you are upset...

Lyssa - posted on 01/03/2010

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there's many different positions u can try, if u haven't already. With my son i had to try every position and make up my own. He would get frustrated because he wasn't getting enough milk and i had to supplement formula for a couple of days till my milk came in. And if you're getting frustrated and tense with it he will sense that and also get frustrated so make sure u relax. I would call the the lactation consultant at the hospital see if she can give u any advice over the phone or even make a house call. Also I recommend looking up different positions to find what is most comfortable for u and the baby. I found with my son laying down on our sides facing eachother was the most comfortable for him. He hated the football position, Hope i helped somewhere in all of this

Ashley - posted on 01/03/2010

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it could be that he's getting too much foremilk and not enough hindmilk (higher fat content)... you should look up some info on it.

[deleted account]

there are breastfeeding doulas that will come to your house and help you.

it took about 6 days for my milk to come in properly, so keep trying with the breast feeding. it's difficult at first, but once you both get going, it gets easier.

don't get discouraged!

Nicola - posted on 01/03/2010

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use a breast pump or by hand express until it comes through then put on his lips then latch him on.good luck

Rebecca - posted on 01/03/2010

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Slow down, take your time, when you frustrated and nerves. He will feel it to, and become frustrated and nerves too. Drink plenty of water that will help your body produce more milk. You may even want to drink water as your feeding him. Practice Practice Practice.. He's not a pro yet, but he'll get it and so will you. God Bless and Good Luck!!!

Emma - posted on 01/03/2010

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I would try and see if a lactation counsellor can come to you. There are many women who breastfed, need a counsellor but cannot leave the house. If they can't, maybe your local heatlh nurse can come by. I know the nurses where we live are well versed in breastfeeding techniques and are more than happy to make a housecall regarding these issues.



In the meantime, you can hand pump your breast to start the milk flow and have your baby taste the milk from your nipple, that would encourage him to latch on. Also, once he gets upset you must stop and calm him down and then retry. You might want to start with the lay down techinque, with skin to skin contact as that would also take the weight of your breast away from his face and chest. Some babies can be quite finicky as to how the want to start feeding. For my son, it was the football hold and it took quite a while for him to get comfortable with the cradle hold. We do also use the sideway laying in the afternoons and during the night as when he is sleepy it slows down my let down.



Take a deep breath, have a cup of tea and try the different positions. Hand pump your breast to start the let down (as a slow let down could be frusturating).



Good luck and enjoy your new baby.

Amy - posted on 01/03/2010

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my son would nurse, but then stop and refuse to. i had no idea why, but i guess i wasn't getting all his burps out. then he started doing better. it was a struggle the first entire month, only a few issues the second month and by the third...smooth sailing. i know people suggested nipple sheilds, but that made my daughter NOT nurse from me. ?? to each his own and try what you need to. I agree with those who said to see if an LC can come to you and the kellymom.com. I had lots of issues because of inverted nipples, but we made it with LC help, family support and i asked a lot of questions to other mums!

Lise - posted on 01/03/2010

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I second the above post - kellymom.com has GREAT help and info! Also, my lactation consultant came to my house!

Ashley - posted on 01/03/2010

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I know it may be a pain in the butt, but you may need a nipple shield. It's a little clear plastic device that goes over your nipple to make it easier for the baby to latch on. I'd try to keep getting him to latch on, but if he isn't getting enough or is having a real rough time learning to breastfeed you might want to try it. The nurse at my hospital told me my daughter couldn't get a good latch on, so she suggested the nipple shield. Here's a website with more info.
http://www.medelabreastfeedingus.com/tip...

Brodie - posted on 01/03/2010

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I'm not sure if anyone else has suggested it but when trying to get your bub to latch aim the nipple above his lip more near his nose as this helps him to open his mouth wider to get a better latch.
Hope it gets better for you. :)

Renee - posted on 01/03/2010

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I had a lot of trouble with my son as well. He would scream and would not latch on very well. I had a nurse come to my house once a week for a month. I found that using a nursing pillow helped get my baby into a comfy position to feed. It also helped that when he was really screaming, my husband would take him and wal around the house to settle him down and then I would try again. It is tough but persevere. My son is now nearly 11 months old and became a brilliant breastfeeder. Everyone kept telling me it would get easier and I didn't believe them but it does. I don't know if you use dummy/pacifier but I also found that helpful. I would put his dummy in to settle him and get him in the position to feed and quickly take his dummy out and put him on. Hope things get easier for you.

Gemma - posted on 01/03/2010

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get in contact with your local Little Angels support group - they were FAB with me. They come to your house and give you as much time and support as you want. It may be hard but do persevere - it will be worth it in the end :-)

Nichole - posted on 01/02/2010

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You can get formula with a little tube that you slip in the babies mouth while they are suckling, just to make sure that they are getting food and it still is breastfeeding... I had to do that for 6 days before my milk came in enough to feed her... it was frustrating but I wanted to breastfeed so bad that I just kept on trying! Please don't give up!!!!

check out this link and google "supplemental nursing system"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supplementa...

Rosemarie - posted on 01/02/2010

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My son didn't latch because he was tongue-tied. Literally. His frenulum (the skin connecting your tongue to the underneath part) was connected to the tip of his tongue and he was not able to stick his tongue out far enough to get a good latch. Also, I wasn't inserting the nipple properly - you have to grab the breast yourself and squeeze it so that he gets the whole areloa in his mouth and then the nipple will fall into place. I went to see a lactation consultant and she was wonderful. I highly recommend that before either of you get any more frustrated. Most will make house calls. Good luck and hang in there!

Goundy - posted on 01/02/2010

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Try massaging your breasts in a downard mothin, from the chest to the nipple, this should help stimulate the mammory glands. Dont worry if your hind milk has not come in yet, mine took several weeks. Rigth now the baby needs the colostrum, clear watery milk colored fluid, that to help start building the immune system and this will also help nurish him
Have you also tried different nursing postions? The LC at the hospital suggested the "football hold" for my daughter when I first started to nurse.
Your best bet would be to get in contact w. the LC at the hospital that you delivered and ask for help. That is what they are there for, trust me, I myself have made several calls out of frustration and she was extreamly helpful.
Give the breast stimutation and the different positions a try and see if this helps.
Do not give up, the little one knows what to do, but may need some help.

Rebecca - posted on 01/02/2010

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most lactation consultants will come to you!!! i think that a nipple sheild is a great idea but do not let him to attached to it...if you give him a binky stop!!! it will only cause nipple confusion same with bottles your baby will not let himself starve...i would stick to just the breast and nothing else

Amanda - posted on 01/02/2010

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take fenugreek for your breast milk to increase, i had to do that. if you ony give the breast he will have no choice bt to eat when hes hungry and try breastfeeding a bit longer even if milk is gone you willproduce more. also try a breast pump to help produce more you can always store extra milk n the freezer forwhen he is older and can do both with no problem. my daughter i breast and bottle and she is 2 months

Anna - posted on 01/02/2010

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find a La Leche League leader here: http://www.llli.org/WebUS.html
this group is very helpful, much better advice and support then hospital staff :0)
don't give up! DO NOT supplement. the problem could be that he is not latching correctly. regardless of religion, your babies well-fare is much more important.--not to be disrespectful, for i belong to a religion w/ similar beliefs, however when it comes to life threatening situations, there are exceptions to any rule. it can take up to 6 weeks before getting "in-sync" w/ BFing. so don't give up, be patient...calm yourself. baby will get it, but finda la leche league counselor IMMEDIATELY :0) keep us updated :0)

Michelle - posted on 01/02/2010

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You should go to a La Leache League meeting alone while your husband watches your baby & you will get help to all your questions & concerns there! You should be able to find a meeting near you, most meetings meet every week & there is one most days of the week:) For increased milk I recommend pumping to lift up your supply ( 5-10 ) 2 times a day! Good Luck!

Sharon - posted on 01/02/2010

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Hi. try getting some yeast into you...i have read that this doubles your milk supply and drink like 4 litres of water a day, and rest up and chill out!!!
I have breast fed 6 babies .....be confident, sleep alot .eat what u want....enjoy the baby and forget about everything else.....
feed 10 mins each breast every feed, then change nappy, and let play and go to sleep....
this will work
a fantastic book is on becoming baby wise in christian bookstores....you cannot go wrong w this book. hope all is working out for you. email me at shazziemays@hotmail.com if you still need help....

Lise - posted on 01/02/2010

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Agree with pretty much everyone above... The first 3 weeks of nursing for me were hell (but totally worth it!). Having a lactation consultant come to my house was a lifesaver!!! She was amazing.

Michelle - posted on 01/01/2010

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I also had trouble with my son latching in the first week. We both had a rough start as he had sucked up some fluid at birth and was taken to special care unit, during the week he spent in there I would go to him every few hours and try and wean him off the IV he was on onto my breast milk. He was having trouble though similar to what your child does, he could latch on but after a couple of sucks would get frustrated and drop off. I had had lactation consultants and others trying to help me but nothing was working. It took a nurse to notice that he actually had a tounge tie, this is the small bit of membrane under your tounge that can be too far forward and does not allow your childs tounge to come forward enough to do the sucking motion needed to breastfeed. It was a simple snip of this membrane (it has no nerves and no blood vessels so it does not hurt to baby) and as soon as he latched onto my breast he was sucking like a mad man, I could not have been more relieved. Could be something they might need to look into because I was told it can be quite common and often not picked up.

Karen - posted on 01/01/2010

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Be very patient. At first their tummys are very small so is not like they need a lot of milk. A couple of drops is all they need when they are born and then their tummys start expanding slowly. I had no support with my last baby but since I was experienced with my other 2 it helped because each kid is different. Dont give up! If possible call in a lactation consultant. I went thru a month of practice and fustrations and pain with all 3 kids. At the end it's so worth it. Drink plenty of water, give him one side at a time and on the next feeding the other breast. If he seems unsatisfied pop in a pacifier, it calms their need for sucking. Remember they have tiny tummys they are not hungry all the time. Ask your family to be supportive and patient. Try to rest with the baby as well and also try feeding him while you're lying down, football position and feel free to ask for more help and support. Remember it's the best milk for babys and u wont need to wash bottles or carry formulas.



Karen mommy to 3 children

Kariani-5 breastfed

Bella-4 breastfed

Isaias-9months breastfeeding

Mrs. Tisha - posted on 01/01/2010

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Hi, Vivien!

I've a daughter & a son. Both were breastfed. My daughter breastfed & stopped on her own when she turned 14 mos old. As for my son it was totally different, he exclusively breastfed & stopped on his own when he turned 30 mos old. It was very easy for me to breastfeed my kidz 'cause I attended the "breastfeeding" classes provided to me by the hospital. The "key factors" are to eat right, drink plenty of fluids & be stress-free while breastfeeding ur son, that way ur breastmilk flows very well w/o any problems @ all.

As for the positioning: The "football & "side lying" (in bed) positions were the perfect ones for me. Try this method. I guarantee it will work for you. Take care now!

Janine - posted on 01/01/2010

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My little one wouldn't latch on for a week so the nurse gave me the nipple shield to try even though they do not recommend to use it for a long time. I bought one and she latched on right away so I used them for a couple weeks and then just kept trying the nipple itself and eventually she just latched without the shield. The shield does help if there is cracking of the nipples as well. I am so glad I hung in there even though it is very frustrating when both of you are learning something new. My baby girl took the bottle and breastfed just fine but I know all babies are different. Good Luck!

Lily - posted on 01/01/2010

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Maybe you can try this solutions suggest.. drink a lot of soy or herbs (produced milk) 1st week is usual problem to certain mum.. I had the same too. Don't stop giving your baby breastfeeding. It is frustrated see you baby unhappy. Take it easy.. relax... take a deep breath.. remember don't stop feeding you baby.. trust me.

Tracey - posted on 01/01/2010

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I had the same prob with my 4 week old baby and the midwife told me to go buy the sheilds and it worked not only that it protects ur nipples to

Angela - posted on 01/01/2010

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I'm not sure if someone else has mentioned this, but if a lactation consultant is not available to come to your home, go to www.lll.org and search for a local La Leche League group. Leaders are more than willing to help over the phone and most are willing to visit your home to assist. Once you're able to leave the house, you may find the meetings to be helpful not only for breastfeeding but also just to talk with other mothers. I think it's amazing that you care so much for your son and understand how difficult teaching a baby how to breastfeed can be. My son was 4 weeks before we really had it down and I would never give up the bond and time we've spent together. Also, not sure if the LLL leader would have the resources, but often what they'll do is weigh your son, then have you nurse, then weigh him again. The difference is a clear picture of how much your son is eating and will make you feel more confident about how you're doing. In the mean time, pump when you can and be proud you're fighting to give your baby the best you can. Good luck and it will get better!!

Jane - posted on 01/01/2010

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I would seriously recommend you get a private lactation consultant to visit you at home if you can't go out. You may even be able to call your local early childhood centre and organise a home visit from a nurse from there for free. You should be able to find them through the council or the hospital.

The first couple of weeks is critical in getting your baby to feed properly and, as a lactation consultant said to me, you are both working out how to do it. It helps not to expect it all to happy "naturally", that you have to work it out.

You are aiming for the baby to open his mouth fully then latch on to your entire nipple and surrounding dark skin. A lactation consultant can give you some exercises to do with your baby to teach him to open his mouth properly and they can check how they are latched on and work out what the problem is.

Sarah - posted on 01/01/2010

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hi!

there are so many posts, i just can't read them all so i apologize if i'm be repetitive.

It may be "positioning" which is preventing your son from latching on, my sis-n-law had that issue. so make sure his tummy is facing your tummy, so his shoulder isn't in the way of latching on to your breast.

And perhaps your brst are engorged and its difficult for him latch on, resulting in only moments of him nursing. So i would pump for a few mins to help make your brst less hard. It's like having your son suck on an orange, pretty challenging.

good luck! :)

Sophie - posted on 01/01/2010

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Quoting Vivien:

what do u guys think of using a nipple shield to help him latch on??



I used a nipple sheild for the first 3 weeks with my LO  as she had trouble latching on. Use them if they help but try to wean them away start with a sheild to draw the nipple out and get him sucking then wait fir a natural pause in his sucking and take it away-its hard work and takes patience but you can both do it!- dont use bottles as they can cause nipple confusion if used before the 2st month especially irt is also a lot easier for him to get milk from a bottle so he may become lazy and think the breast is too much like hard work! Keep offering him the breast and you will be producing plenty of milk, my LO would only feed for a few mins at a time at the beginning then wake up 40 mins to an hour later for more (this is normal yhey have tiny stomachs) lots of skin to skin contact is good. He will get it you just have to keep trying and persevere. I agree with what lots of other people havesaid try to see if you can get a lactation consultant to come to you or ask your midwife fir support

Ashley - posted on 01/01/2010

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Just don't quit! I had the exact same issues; it literally won't be until like 6 weeks where you hit a stride with him, it's a struggle for some of us at first and that is o.k. Just don't let anyway tell you that you can't breastfeed! I would suggest doing what you're doing, being really calm, and just soothing him and keep gently pushing the nipple to his mouth. If minutes go by and he is getting more and more frustrated, quit, give him a bottle, and retry the next time. He will get it and he will prefer the boob eventually! It just takes time and you don't want him to have negative reactions to the breast by "starving him out." All this is my opinion but it all worked for me! :)

[deleted account]

Try calling a local midwife to come over to help....that's the best. Not sure where you are. Are you based in Klang Valley, Malaysia? If you are, send me an email at treasuremines@gmail.com & I can give you more details of the lady who helped me. She comes to the house & that s a great help, esp for new mummies

Erica - posted on 12/31/2009

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Stick in there! It takes time for them to learn how to do this. Remember, this is new for them too! But yeah it took awhile for my son to latch on too. If he is not nursing at all, I would supplement with formula. Once he gets the hang of it, make sure you let him stay on the breast for awhile so that your milk can come in. The more he nurses the more milk your body will make. But on the other hand if it is too stressful for you and the baby, there is nothing wrong with bottle. Good luck!

Janel - posted on 12/31/2009

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Have a lactation consultant come to you!! My son would not latch on for 2 months without a nipple shield. At two months he figured it out and he nursed for a year until I wanted to get pregnant again and I weaned him. one thing that may help is to let your let down happen before you put him to the breast. both of my kids would choke because the milk came too fast. plus when you are engorged your nipple may be flatter than it will be after your let down. Hang in there nursing is worth it, but get help from a licensed lactation consultant.

Mattee - posted on 12/31/2009

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It seemed like my son hit a little growth spurt at this time and the milk wouldn't come fast enough for him... Just keep at it and don't give up!

Nichole - posted on 12/31/2009

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I had similar issues with my daughter. It turned out that she was "tounge tied" and needed a simple proceddure so that she could get her tounge out to nurse properly. Unfortunately, we had to use a bottle until that was done and she went through a period of about a week where she would only take the bottle (of expressed breastmilk.) One thing that helped get her back to nursing was to pump a little before trying to get her to latch so that she didn'thave to work as hard to get the "flow" started. Don't give up! You and your son will be a wonderful nursing pair in no time!

Jodi - posted on 12/31/2009

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I definitely agree about asking a lactation consultant to come to your house. I went to a lactation consultant and she really was able to calm my fears and help me relax enough to make things better. Don't stress too much about having to give the baby a bottle if you are having better luck with pumping or if you have to supplement with formula. We did this for the first few weeks until my little girl was better able to latch (she was slightly tongue-tied and it had to stretch, they didn't think it was bad enough to clip). She had no trouble whatsoever with nipple confusion and I knew she was getting enough to eat which helped me be more relaxed. During the times we gave her formula, my husband fed her and I pumped at the same time just to make sure I kept up with her demands. Good luck! I hope someone can come to your house and help you.

Aimee - posted on 12/31/2009

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I have nursed 3 children (2 of them for nearly 2 yrs each) and all 3 had their own way they prefered to nurse. What worked for one baby might not work for the next one. Each baby is different, and each mother is also different. Altough all of the advice here is great and may be very helpful, it's hard for any of us other mommies to know exactly what to say to help because there are so many possibilities of what could be causing your babies frustration with nursing. It may be that your milk isn't letting down fast enough...or it could be that it is letting down too fast. It could be the shape of your nipples...or it could be the shape of baby's mouth or tongue. The point is, without being there in person to see how the baby reacts to the breast, it's hard to know for sure what to do. I really reccommend having a lactation consultant or midwife, etc come to your home to help. They can observe in person and know exactly what to do to help. I had a lactation consultant help with all 3 of my babies. The first was preemie and needed lots of help nursing, the second had a hard time latching on (we did use the nipple shield - it was a miracle tool for us!!) and with the 3rd baby the lactation consultant just helped me get the baby positioned right. Obviously by #3 I knew what I was supposed to do, but it is still very helpful to have an extra set of hands....especially since I had had a c-section. If you cannot get a professional to come to your home ask your spouse or another family member or friend to help. They can help hold the baby while you hold the breast and try to position his mouth correctly to get a proper latch. I know it sounds awkward, but it really will make a difference having an extra set of hands.

Here are some phone numbers and websites that may help:

NURSING MOTHERS COUNCIL:
www.nursingmothers.org 1-408-291-8008

LA LECHE LEAGUE :
www.lalecheleague.org 1-800-525-3243

You might also try your local WIC (Women, Infant, Children) office if you have one

Best of Luck! :)

Francesca - posted on 12/31/2009

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Oh cultural beliefs, how I hate thee. I completely ignored my mother and sister in laws yelling at me when they insisted that i would get my baby sick if I left the house. My doctor said that getting out is far better for the baby as long as she was full term and thriving. That they needed direct sunlight. But I understand if you don't want to put up with the hassel of family arguing with you.



I actually had a public health nurse who specialized in lacation come right to my house to check up on me because I was so worried about my latch within a few days of being discharged from the hosipital.



Have you tried to call LLL in your area. I am sure they would send someone right away to help!



And I learned the hard way not to wait until my little Ella cried before offering her breast because she was often too hungry and upset to latch. I started offereing inbetween and that worked wonders for us.



And as long as he is gaining weight I wouldnt worry too much. At this stage of the game they want to latch all the time even when they are not hungry. My little Ella would want to latch because she was seeking comfort and would cry once let down happened because she was already full. (till she learned to spit...yuk!)



Good luck and Happy New Year!

[deleted account]

all the advice here is perfect... only thing I can find to add is maybe when you find your nice quiet spot to feed, slip off your shirt. Unwrap the baby slightly, let him snuggle up right on your skin. Skin to skin contact is a huuuuuuge help. Unwrapping the baby makes them cooler, more awake and alert.
I understand you don't want to leave the house for a while yet, I didn't go out of my house either. Maybe you can find a midwife in your phone book that could come by your home and make sure your baby's latch is good?

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