Replacing Breastmilk

Melanie - posted on 11/09/2009 ( 8 moms have responded )

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It is time for me to stop breastfeeding but when I have tired giving my son whole milk it upsets his stomach. My husband doesn't want me to stop nursing totally until I have something to replace my milk. I am going to the baby's one yr check up next week but wanted to know if any of you moms have any suggestions?? Please help

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Robyn - posted on 08/16/2011

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I bf'd my daughter to 18 months. At 1 year she started getting soy milk in her bottles and only bf'd when we were together. Which worked out well when she had her first upset stomach because I didn't have to give her solids, she just bf'd all that day. One time I got rice milk by accident and noticed that she was a lot less gassy, so we switched to rice milk. You can also try skim milk, or even 1/2 milk 1/2 water.

I dried out naturally as she started going to sleep on her own and was having too much fun playing and discovering to be latched to mommy.

About stopping, the time really is so short, and he's going to be attached to you whether you bf or not.... you're mommy! Maybe plan some playdates or a playdate co-op so you can have some time. If grandma wants to help put she can take him over night, you won't lose your milk in one night and you might not even get full at this point.

The important thing about stopping is that you are comfortable with it.

Kathy - posted on 11/09/2009

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Here's one of my favorite quotes for some inspiration:
"But how much intense parenting they need, possibly including frequent nursing, in the second year depends for the most part on their inborn timetable for emotional development. As parents we can slow down emotional growth by leaving needs unmet. But there is nothing extra we can do to speed it up. ...your investment in your toddler who seems to be 'always attached' will pay off when the time for independence does come. -- Norma Jane Bumgarner in "Mothering Your Nursing Toddler"

http://www.kellymom.com/parenting/velcro...
"Older babies and toddlers can get really clingy at times. Sometimes it seems as if your child has been nursing all day (or all night), or has been clinging to your leg all day long (even when you go to the bathroom) and you really just need a break.

These "velcro days" usually have a cause (even if we only know after the fact): teething, illness, a developmental advance. But even when you know the reason behind a clingy episode, it can still be very frustrating, particularly if you had something you expected to get done or if you were simply anticipating some time to yourself.

Do know that each of us gets overwhelmed from time to time. Remember - these moments pass, even though it may seem like forever when you're in the middle of one of these days."

Bottom Line- Hang in there- It will get better. Self-weaning is child led and means your child decides when he wants to stop breastfeeding. My older son Trey has always been very independent but, when he turned 3 he decided that some nights he preferred to sleep in his bedroom and on those nights he did not nurse by his own choice. He cut down from nursing 6-8 times a day to only nursing 2-3 times a day when he was 2. He started doing this progressively more and more until finally when he was about 3 1/2 years old he never asked for his "ninnie" anymore unless he was very sick and not taking any other fluids or when he got hurt really bad (his grandfather accidentally rolled over his big toe with his electric wheelchair and he had to get stitches). His sister is 22 months old now and still nursing 8-10 times per day. Sometimes I feel like she's a newborn but, it's very important to her. Our children depend on us not only for nutrition but, for their sense of security.

Believe me at times I've felt like you do. It's nothing to feel guilty about. But, are you ready to deal with the repercussions of stopping cold turkey? I don't think I have enough will power to listen to the screaming fits that I know would take place because i know that I can comfort my kid very easily by offering her - the security that only I can offer her. Furthermore, I take pride in the fact that I have the ability to make my child feel happy and secure.

Some people will tell you that if you don't wean at a year that your child will never wean; it's not true. Your child will wean when your child is ready.

But, in order to persuade you a little further I would like you to know these facts about extended breastfeeding: The World Health Organization emphasizes the importance of nursing up to two years of age or beyond (WHO 1992, WHO 2002).

The American Academy of Family Physicians recommends that breastfeeding continue throughout the first year of life and that "Breastfeeding beyond the first year offers considerable benefits to both mother and child, and should continue as long as mutually desired." They also note that "If the child is younger than two years of age, the child is at increased risk of illness if weaned." (AAFP 2001)

Nursing toddlers between the ages of 16 and 30 months have been found to have fewer illnesses and illnesses of shorter duration than their non-nursing peers (Gulick 1986).

If you have any further questions or want to discuss more - please do I am very open to helping you with whatever your choice might be.

Melanie - posted on 11/09/2009

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Quoting Kathy :

Why is it time for you to stop breastfeeding? Is it a personal choice? I have to say I agree with your husband that you shouldn't stop breastfeeding completely. Have you thought about allowing your child to self-wean? The benefits of extended breastfeeding are never ending for both you and your baby. The World Health Organization recommends breastfeeding for a minimum of 2 years. Check out this extended breastfeeding fact sheet for tons of benefits for you and baby:
http://www.kellymom.com/bf/bfextended/eb...

It is possible that your baby has a milk allergy. Have you thought about expressing breastmilk for your baby?


I have tried pumping. Don't like it and didnt seem to work very well for me. I didn't care for the pump I had. When the child self-weans how do they do that? My son is 12 1/2 months old and has for the most part stopped feeding except before bed at night and in the morning. He does feed if he wakes up in the middle of the night too but that does not happen often. I don't mind continuing to feed but at the same time part of me is ready to be done. I don't know if I should stop or not. I know its good for him to continue so I am a bit torn.

Melanie - posted on 11/09/2009

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In all honesty I don't NEED to stop yet. I have been being pressured by my mom to stop, mostly because my son's constant attachment to me. I have been struggling with not being able to do ANYTHING without him. Sometimes I just feel like I cant breathe. At the same time I don't want to stop too. My husband is in the Navy and in school training for his job right now and he doesn't want me to get a job right now because of how fast and intense his schooling will be for the next 6 months. So I am not really in any hurry to stop but want to get an idea of what to do.

Kathy - posted on 11/09/2009

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Why is it time for you to stop breastfeeding? Is it a personal choice? I have to say I agree with your husband that you shouldn't stop breastfeeding completely. Have you thought about allowing your child to self-wean? The benefits of extended breastfeeding are never ending for both you and your baby. The World Health Organization recommends breastfeeding for a minimum of 2 years. Check out this extended breastfeeding fact sheet for tons of benefits for you and baby:
http://www.kellymom.com/bf/bfextended/eb...

It is possible that your baby has a milk allergy. Have you thought about expressing breastmilk for your baby?

Tiffany - posted on 11/09/2009

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There is now a "second phase" infant formula for 9-24 months. Enfamil makes it. This is what I used for my daughter when she was 10.5 months old and I found out I was pregnant with our third. She refused to take "normal" formula, but this she took. Once he starts taking this, maybe mix half formulat and half whole milk to get him accustomed to regular milk. You can also pump BM and mix it with regular milk (it will last longer than an hour, which is all you have with formula) as well. Good luck.

Amy - posted on 11/09/2009

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Nestle goodstart worked for me and you may try the next step formula. As with any switch from breast to formula there will probably be some gas and constipation issues. Just use mylacon and watered down apple juice. I would ask the doc if you can use soymilk instead of cows milk. Maybe your son is lactose intollerant.

Amanda - posted on 11/09/2009

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What if you go to the NEXT STEP FORMULA instead of whole milk. It may be gentler on the tummy.

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