Wanting to EBF, what things should I buy to make it easier?

Leah - posted on 01/19/2011 ( 117 moms have responded )

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I'm a first time mom due in 8-12 weeks, and I don't know what someone who is going to EBF needs! I'm planning on staying home with the little one (my hubby is military so money isn't an issue) but still, no clue! I need help !

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Lauren - posted on 01/22/2011

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My rec is to buy as little as possible. I think when you're newly nursing it can be tempting to solve problems by using things, when what you usually need to do is simply persist with nursing, nursing, nursing. I'd get a nursing pillow like a boppy, some comfortable sleep bras (Motherhood sells them), and a box of disposable nursing pads. Set up a nice nursing area with a comfortable chair, the tv remote, your computer/phone, and a water bottle, and keep it simple. You shouldn't need bottles, pacifiers, or pumps. Just boobs, a baby, and love. Good luck!! It can be intimidating at first but stick with it and you will both catch on.

Carolyn - posted on 01/22/2011

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i guess i never thought i didnt exclusive breastfeed my son , because He had a bottle or too of expressed breast milk that was stored and i use it to mix his cereal months later ?? oh well i guess....



I personally didnt have time to take showers between or after each feeding. My manual pump was a boob saver. for me anyways. I didnt see a need to endure pain, or make things even more taxing on myself than being a first time mom was already. Besides, gravity si gonna make my boobs sag over time anyways.



My son was nursed on demand and i was still retardedly engorged an in pain.



everyone's choices are different though !



as far as i am concerned, my son was exclusively breast fed.

Michelle - posted on 01/22/2011

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engorgement can be solves by hand expressing until your breast isnt as hard, and then latch baby on to to the rest. There shouldnt be engorgment if you feed on demand. And if you experience this a warm shower or warm compress on your breasts will solve the problem.

Breastpumps can make your boobs sag as they are not mimicking your babys rythem or suckling.

Michelle - posted on 01/22/2011

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Because she wants to Exclusively Breastfeed. Which means no dummies, no bottles, etc... pumping means its gotta go into a bottle/on a spoon/cup and this can sometimes make baby less inclined to take the breast. If you speak to your lactation consultant they too will say no pumps.

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Gwen - posted on 02/20/2011

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My opinion would be really to buy nothing. You have to keep in mind that during the first few weeks you are establishing demand which in turn determines supply and if you pump (even to relieve engorgement), you could throw it outta whack.

I say the best thing you can do is read, read, read. Also, make sure before you leave the hospital you have utilized the lactation consultant's services to the max! And as other posters have said, do not keep formula in the house and do not supplement. Ever. It starts a cycle of dependence b/c every time the baby eats you should be feeding him/her... if you're not, your body is being told not to make more milk and your supply will adjust.

A pump is helpful later, but as far as immediate necessities go... they're attached!

[deleted account]

Another one here who says No Pump! Definitely not in the early days, when you want your baby to latch properly. In the early days, don't put extra pressure on your nipples!
If you need to express, do it manually, have a warm shower to keep the milk flowing, or use warm cloths.
Before your milk comes in you baby will have the marvellous pre-milk, colostrum, which is all she needs before your milk comes in.
I breastfed my 3 long term in the days when it was not considered de rigeur to buy a pump till you were going back to work.

There's a thread on preparing to breastfeed in this community. entitled:
BF MYTH: Breastfeeding comes naturally, doesn’t it? – Or does it?
http://www.circleofmoms.com/breastfeedin...

all the best!

Nicola - posted on 02/14/2011

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its breast feeding you don't actually Need anything except your boobs some of the suggestions are great for comfort but other than nursing bras which are so convenient when you go out you may be better waiting and seeing. I had to use the under arm hold to feed my babies so a nursing pillow was no good to me and neither where those laid back chairs. i would recomend breast feeding classes before you have the baby if you have them available as i found they where brilliant. With the way shops are open all the time now you can easily shop for anything you need after you have had your little one. good luck hope you enjoy ebf'ing.

User - posted on 02/03/2011

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Leah, My first advice is to forgo the use of bottles and pacifiers until BF is going smoothly,about 4 to 6 weeks. Hubby can get involed and bond with baby in other ways. Kangaroo care is awsome as a bonding tool.Surround yourself with a support group and distance yourself from those who aren't.Get help at the first sign of trouble. I know it sounds like I am saying "be a wimp" but seriously the baby and you are learning. Don't teach the baby to continue a latch that hurts! It will only lead to failure. Good luck! Rebecca CBE

Lisa - posted on 02/03/2011

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P.S a hooter hider is good for a first timer, it allows you to cover when you feel a littel exposed and has a little opening that goes around your neck so you can peek in to make sure the latch is good!

Lisa - posted on 02/03/2011

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I loved my bobby pillow the first couple moths just to giv emy arms a break. See if your hospital will rent a pump or bieng military soemtimes the base hospitals have programs. I was given a beautiful hospital grade pump to use free until she was 1 yr. Don;t buy a ton of nursing bras until a few weeks after nursing when your milk really comes in. Trust me it will be a waste. Try really hard no to use BF as a way to get baby to sleep. try other soothing methods or you will find you have a baby who has to nurse to sleep- I know I have a 2 yr old who still wants to nurse to sleep. I would suggest some nipple ointment becasue the first few days might be rough and its nice to just have it on hand=) And remember it could be very easy or it could be work. every woman and child are different. if you get to where its just not working, call a local La Leche League person or you r local hospital and they will send someone over to make it smoother. They are life savers!

Loretta - posted on 02/02/2011

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Not to make any jokes here, but to be a successful breastfeeding mom you need breasts and a baby - and whole lot of patience. It will take time, but you'll teach each other how it works for you.



I recommend picking up a Boppy. It will make positioning of your newborn easy, which will help with any latch issues that could cause nipple discomfort. Then later, the Bobby can be used to assist your little one with sitting. Even later, it makes a great headrest for watching TV!



I would pick up some Lanolin, just in case you do get cracked nipples (I know I did)... and a whole MESS of nursing tanks (which you can get at Target for $15). A box of pads will be helpful for leaks until your letdown is normalized.



Make sure to get the number of a lactation consultant from the hospital (so your calls are free) and call her as often as possible. I also recommend getting a pump. You will be staying home, which is GREAT, but for those nights that you may go away (a friend's wedding perhaps) or that you'll get a sitter and have a glass (okay three) of wine, you'll need to pump. I was given a hand pump in the hospital before going home and it was the only hand pump I could make work. I returned to work full time when my son was 9 weeks old, and I used a double electric pump (Medela Pump In Style) - but that's going to be too excessive for your needs.



*my son turned 17m yesterday, and I'm still breastfeeding*

Brandy - posted on 02/02/2011

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I would absolutely buy a pump. The first 4 weeks nurse on demand and then after that, after you nurse, pump whatever else you have leftover. This builds an awesome supply and you can freeze the extra which REALLY comes in handy TRUST me.
Speaking of freezing, the lansinoh bags are the best bang for your buck. Gerber leak and Medela are too expensive.
Buy a boppy pillow or a breast friend pillow. Nursing pillows are worth their weight in gold.
Buy a few good nursing bras.
Buy some lanolin (SP??) cream. From about day 5 post partum to about day 10-12 post partum, your nipples will get REALLY sore and tender. It passes. You just have to try your best to deal with it so you don't interrupt your supply.
Buy lots of healthy snacks. Eat well and eat often and drink a gallon of water a day. This will help with milk production.
Buy some clothing (not necessarily NURSING tops...i found those awkward and uncomfortable) that are easy to 'whip the boob out' You pretty much spend the first two months strapped to that baby lol.
Hope this helps! Best of luck! Nursing exclusively was the best decision I ever made. I did it for one year. Never bought formula.

Donna - posted on 02/01/2011

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a pump and some extra bottles for when you decide to go out and dont wanna breastfeed in public. other than that theres really nothing else special you'll need

Tracy - posted on 02/01/2011

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A nursing cover was a life save for me. I got a Hooter Hider online. It is so much easier than using a blanket when you need to nurse when you are out and about.

Angela - posted on 02/01/2011

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um, nothing! if you end up needing a pump you can rent one from the hospital. that's what happened to us when my son didn't catch on to the latching thing till day 4. that's (one of) the wonderful things about breast feeding is you only need a boob and a baby!!

Erin - posted on 02/01/2011

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Just don't give up!

I did not feel well after my son was born. And it was very hard to get him to breast feed...but we kept tring and it worked out.

Our biggest issues was he was just was not interested. It was hard for me and him. My son was very demanding. No patients. I really wanted him to breast feed. I pumped, did formula and we finally made it work. By week three he was a fully breast feed bady. Best tip I got, because he would not lach, was maybe try when he not so hungary and you're not so stressed. We did... and it worked!

Katrina - posted on 02/01/2011

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You have gotten A LOT of replies! I'll put in my two cents, too!
1. Boppy Pillow or MyBrestFriend
2. Nursing Pads (washable ones are VERY cheap or you can get disposable)
3. Lanolin
4. Nursing tanks or shirts - there are some cute shirts out there!
5. Glider with an ottoman - it's amazing how putting your feet up just a little helps tremendously!
6. extra bottles and a bottle warmer

I also used pump. When you pump after your LO is done eating, you can start to store extra milk so your hubby can help! We were on a three-hour feeding schedule 6am - 9am - noon - 3pm - 6pm - 9pm - midnight - 3am. I would feed the baby at 9pm and my hubby would get up for the midnight feeding and use a bottle so I could sleep. Then I'd do the 3am and hubby would do 6am so I could rest. Or we'd switch and I'd go to bed early, feed at midnight and 6, and my hubby would feed at 9pm and 3am. It was so helpful! I would always pump a little after each feeding to keep my supply up. Having extra bottles on hand is great for when you have a sitter, too. You can go on a date with your husband and know your LO is still getting your milk!

As someone else said, I loved Avent. They have rubber stoppers for ease in freezing the bottles (so you're not freezing nippples) and they have an affordable bottle warmer that my husband LOVED. we never had to worry if the milk was too hot or not warm enough.

Also, I recommend a book called "How My Breasts Saved the World." Very funny and SO TRUE! Start reading before the baby comes. She gives great helpful tips!

GOOD LUCK!!

Morgan - posted on 02/01/2011

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you need diapers, and clothes. not much else. unless you are working you will not need a pump or bottles. Co-sleeping works best with breastfeeding if you are not comfortable with this than a co-sleeper for beside your bed. A nursing pillow is nice but not a must have you can just use a normal pillow folded in half to support your arm. Drink lots of water to keep your supply up and relax. If you do get a pump do not try to pump for the first month let your body get use to nursing before adding the pressure of letting down to a pump. Do not supplement it will effect your supply. You can produce what your baby needs just let the baby suckle as much as he/she wants for the first few days and supply for demand will kick in, if you supplement your body will have trouble producing enough and it is a endless cycle. Find a lactation educator in your area, or if the hospital has a good one( A good one will NEVER suggest supplementing in the first few days of life) use them.If you need any more info feel free to contact me I am a Lactation educator and have nursed 3 kids exclusively for over a year apiece myself. :) Mamma you are doing the very best thing for your baby.Keep it up!!!

[deleted account]

A great nursing bra. At least 3 and some good pads to soak up leaks while your out in public.
I never used a pump and I BF 3 kids a year each, but it took dedication!
A good shawl to cover up while out.
Thats all I ever needed!

Reba - posted on 01/31/2011

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Great info Tina. I am a mother of 4, 7 down to 7 months, and I EBF all of my LO's until 6 1/2 months each. It is great for the baby, great for moms recovery and convienent with correct temp, and supply readily available at the babys schedule. I would suggest the book, Baby Whisperer, By Tracy Hogg. I have found it helpful. I tracked my recovery progress and my LO's progress by having a daily journal. if I ate something and my LO was fussy afterwards I could go back onto the journal to see what I ate that might have caused it and possible cut out that particular food for a while. If you choose to be away from LO and need to feed from bottle I strongly reccomend GLASS bottles. They are far better than the plastic bottles and those with plastic liners. There is a lot more that I could say for what has worked for me however I will leave this open for other moms to also make suggstions that might help. If you want to talk further please message me and I will be glad to help. My children are VERY healthy, almost never going to hospital or dr for sickness and I know it has much to do with BF and using GLASS bottles.
All the best to you with L & D enjoy your LO. Look forward to hearing fromyou with updates on how things are going.
God Bless.

Lyndsy - posted on 01/31/2011

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Lots of grest suggestions! I didn't use these, but found out about them recently and would recommend them to any new mom wanting to BF. http://www.mymilkies.com/
They not only help with leakage, but they store the milk instead of wasting it. Leaks happen- this is a way to save the milk, which is nice when you think about how much you will lose over the months! If you are going to pump, a storage system that makes it wasy for you to see when you pumped so that you know how long the milk will last. Medela makes a storage system that uses bottles which should work directly with their pumps. http://www.medelabreastfeedingus.com/pro... They also sell storage bags. You might want to consider renting an electric pump before you buy one since they are an expensive investment. Some of them come with the manual pump (my Medela did), so look into what each one comes with before buying anything if you plan on pumping.
Good luck!

Heather - posted on 01/31/2011

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a nice cover if you are a modest person, i only use mine when company is over or im out. possibly a boppy to make yourself comfortable. thats about it. oh breast pads I like lanslioh(sp?) purple box at target. they are indiv. wrapped and work great.

Jennifer - posted on 01/30/2011

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I found that being a stay-at-home mom nursing bras weren't a high priority..when we were out with the baby I gave him pumped milk so it wasn't necessary. But I lived in the nursing tank tops for months. They're nice because the provide a little support. The medela pump instyle is by far one of the best pumps out there and they are compatible with ALOT of different bottles so you don't have to spring for the expensive medela ones. Definitely need some lanolin for chapped nipples and nursing pads( I liked Johnson & Johnson the best)
Also, be prepared to pass out during feedings...nobody told me this! But between the lack of sleep and the hormone that is released during feeding it makes for a sleepy mama. Do not let the lactation consultants freak you out, some of them tend to be a little overzealous about BFing. It seems like it should be the easiest thing in the world but it can be very frustrating and exhausting. It's important to try to stay calm because being relaxed helps your milk supply. And it should never hurt during a feeding..if it does then LO is not latched properly or you could have an infection. But the girls will hurt if they are full and you don't feed or pump. And that stuff can spray a good distance sometimes..lol

Camille - posted on 01/29/2011

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I had a problem with an inverted nipple when my milk first came. If this happens, you can buy a nipple shield to help with bfing. But all the other women before have suggested things that I would have suggested.

Sarah - posted on 01/29/2011

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To try and insure a good latching from your baby I would recammend that as soon as he is born put him straight to the breast. I was not able to do this because I had my son c-section. I still breast fed him even thought he would not latch on by pumping and storing. I got the freezer bags that attach to the pump and stored it which ended up great thing because I ended up in the hospital for c-sec. infection and my hubby was able to take it out one at a time and put in fridge till thawed and give to my son. Most ppl that I have talked to if they put the baby right away from the womb to the breast have had great success. I perfer the avent bottles for when your away also. and a really good breat pump. Good luck sweety and 1000 congratulations on your first little one.

Nina - posted on 01/28/2011

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if you'll be staying home with your bubba, you don't need to buy anything to EBF. just a few like nursing bra, nursing pads (though i do without both since i'm just at home).. but if you do go out to run errands, you need a good nursing bra and pads. other optional stuff - nursing cover (but a blanket could work as well), teether (when baby get's older and biting - no to pacifier as this disrupts his feeding). oh and a good book to have: the womanly art of breastfeeding, get it and read it before you give birth :D

Rebecca - posted on 01/28/2011

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One thing that I found that has been really helpful is a nursing cover. It loops around the neck but has a bend that allows you to see baby. I used blankets to cover up with my 1st one and he always grabbed the blanket and didn't like being covered up while nursing. This has been such a huge help when nursing in public. I bought mine online at babies r us, but I'm sure they are everywhere. Good luck!

Christina - posted on 01/28/2011

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I don't think too many things are needed to breast feed successfully, just you and baby! I don't use a pump, I hand express to relieve pressure (when milk first comes in) and also express some in case I need to leave baby with my husband for an hour. I pretty much put my social life on hold until baby is old enough to be left for a couple hours, or else I take baby with me (even an evening out with the girls is great with baby) Personally I don't like breastfeeding pillows - I found that any normal pillow around the house does the same job. Nursing bras are a must though! good luck.

Kristen Marie - posted on 01/28/2011

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Get a Boppy! They are the best! I am still breastfeeding my six month old son and I am working full time so I have a pump as well. I have fallen in love with the nursing tanks and rarely wear bras when I am with my son because they seem to bulky and he gets annoyed with them...like they are in his way or something. The tanks are much more flexible and tuck under my breast much more nicely and my son doesn't get annoyed! :) You'll certainly need breast pads to prevent "leak throughs!" I love the Lansinoh ones. I had lanolin cream but have NEVER had to use it. So don't go too hog wild buying it. You'll get it all figured out as you go! A year ago I was sitting in the same boat as you! :) It is a wonderful thing and you'll never regret it!!!!

[deleted account]

You have a lot of good advice already. I've nurse both of my sons, my first to 20 months and my second will turn one soon and we're still nursing.

So here's what I think, definitely talk to a lactation consultant! It's all the advice you need. Don't let anyone tell you that you can't do it. It really is a very small percent of women who can't breastfeed. It will hurt at the beginning, but you can handle it. If you think the pain is too much then talk to a lactation consultant first, before doing anything rash! Even if you get mastitis, the best thing to do is nurse through it, seriously! This is the best thing for your baby and for you and his/hers relationship. Okay, enough preachiness, sorry!...

You really just need a comfy place to sit, maybe a boppy or just some extra pillows. Get some comfy nursing shirts for going out, I suggest old navy ones. The soothing gel pads and leaky pad things are good, but you don't need many! Get some lanolin. If you ever want a night off, then get a pump. I have a medela with medela bottles. If you're a stay at home, you really don't need more than 4 bottles and if you get the big pump, it comes with 4. I found that at the beginning when I was able to store a lot of milk that the freezer thing that flattens bags (at babies r us) was really helpful, but again, not totally necessary. You will need some freezer bags though. Good luck!

Lexi - posted on 01/27/2011

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Lets see, here's my list of must haves from when I was nursing.

- comfortable nursing bras (including at least one sleeping bra. Those puppies will need more support at night now and you need something to put the nursing pads in.) Also get pajamas that are easy to nurse in if you don't sleep nude.
- nursing tops, I like the nursing tank tops, that way you can lift your regular shirt up, the tank still covers your belly, but the flap lets them nurse. I was self conscious of my post prego tummy.
- lots and lots of nursing pads for inside your bra, either the disposable ones or the washable ones. The leaks can be atrocious at times, especially if you're late for a feeding!
I would probably get a cheap pump at some point, or a nice one if you can afford it. Even if you're staying home, eventually you will want to get out for a couple hours on your own, whether to the grocery store or out with friends or whatever. And of course grandma's going to want to baby sit! lol Hand expressing is a pain in the arse!!
- lanolin for the sore cracked times
- a heat pack for while you are engorged the first few weeks. It takes time for your body to realize how much your baby needs and when, usually it makes way too much milk at first and it can hurt.
- a baby sling type carrier. I have several friends who were masters at having their baby nurse while in a sling. It gave them so much freedom to use their hands or even be able to be up doing stuff while nursing instead of stuck in a chair. I never mastered that trick tho! My sling was still my all time must have baby item anyways. Instantly put my son to sleep and made grocery shopping and household chores possible for me.
- my son hated blankets over his head and hated nursing covers. I eventually stopped even trying. Screw other people and their nosey opinions, they can turn their head away. I show less boob bfing than they do in a swim suit. If you're uncomfortable without a cover tho, which is totally ok and understandable btw, the ones that seemed the most functional and useful IMO were the kind that had a stiff piece of plastic boning sewn into the top hem. There was a strap to drape around your neck to keep it from slipping and instead of like most covers or using a blanket, the boning left an opening so you could just look down and be able to see your baby nursing, see what your hands are doing, whether or not baby is latching properly, etc.... I had a really hard time nursing and not being able to see what I was doing under other covers made it ten times worse!
- oh you'll need the breast milk storage baggies or containers or bottles with lids if you do pump for short times away from the kiddo.

I think that's about all I can think of as far as actually stuff goes. You're number one most important thing to have tho is people willing to support you and the number for the la leche league or your local lactation consultant on speed dial. They were life savers for me! I was shocked to find that even tho bfing is natural, it does not always come naturally. For momma or baby. Me and my bub had to work really hard to get it right. My hubby was right there with me the whole time encouraging me. He sat in on the consultations with the nursing lady at the hospital so that later, when I was trying to feed T, he could help me remember what they had said. Your support can be friends, a mom, any body. Just someone who understands your decision to breast feed and can encourage you.

Tanya - posted on 01/27/2011

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Invest in some good nursing tanks. I love the bravado tanks and also the tanks from target. Personally, I like the ones from target that are half sling (meaning they only go under the breast, not encircle) because for me, the circle tends to show above the tank, which means they show above some clothes and in the summer I can't wear them alone. My favorite are the bravado tanks, though. They are very supportive, even for my large chest size and less flexible than others I have, plus comfy material. Steer clear of the ones that have rubber under the bra (so uncomfortable)! I would also get a good breast pump. Check with your insurance as it might be covered Mine sent me a free medela pump. The book "So That's What They're For" was also a great resource and a fun and easy read. It helps with positions, troubleshooting, and what to expect. Good luck!

Nichole - posted on 01/27/2011

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Get a good nursing pillow, like a Boppy. Get yourself some nursing pads. I prefer Lansinoh because they have adhesive so they won't slip out of your bra, plus they're made with the same gel that they put in diapers so if you really start to leak, they won't. Get a nursing cover, so you'll be comfortable when you're out and about. Blankets can work in a pinch, but they can slide off of your shoulder. I also am a military spouse and have EBF 2 children and am awaiting our 3rd any day now and will do the same with her. I personally never pumped. I just always had my babies with me so I nursed them for every single meal until I introduced food at 6mos. That might seem like a long time, but it goes by so fast. But if you think you might occasionally pump, just buy a cheap hand pump. If you're staying at home then you won't use an electric one enough to make it worth it. I also never used pacifiers. If my babies needed comforting, I just nursed them. But if you choose to use them, then get the matching bottles so that it will be familiar for your baby. Nursing bras are fantastic, and I just found nursing shirts with my last child and they're great too. I always just wore shirts that were stretchy or unbuttoned because I refuse to lift my shirt to nurse. I hate doing it because your entire abdomen is exposed and I just get cold really easily, plus it just seems like too much fabric bunched up right above where the baby is. But I'd stretched out the neck of too many shirts, lol, so I love nursing shirts. Or just really stretchy tank tops under a lower cut shirt works great too. Congrats on your baby. I've known a lot of people who get frustrated with nursing before they even leave the hospital so just let me encourage you to hang in there. You can do it. Really:-) You're making the absolute best choice for your baby. It's an experience that you'll never forget!

Bethany - posted on 01/27/2011

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The great news is, you don't need much at all! You might want a good nursing pillow, it makes it easier, but you can always use something else in a pinch. Personally, I started out with a pillow and ended up just holding the baby.
Cloth nursing pads!!! I can't tell you how great these are. You can wash and re-use them and not spend a ton of money, plus they are much more comfortable than the paper ones.
If you are shy, you might want a cover for nursing in public.
Lanolin for your breasts might be good too. When you start it can hurt and babies put your nipples through a trial, so that stuff can really help.

That's basically it. There's not a lot you really NEED. Just stuff that makes it easier on you. :) Remember, women have been doing this since the beginning of humans on earth and they didn't have anything!
Kudos to you for EBF!!!

Madilyn - posted on 01/27/2011

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the best advice I can give is what not to get. Don't get formula or have any around, don't have bottles around, it makes it to easy to stop if you have the temptation. I would suggest to not get a pump unless you really need it, it can cause too much stress and really the best thing for mother and baby is to nurse exclusively from the breast for at least the first month before introducing bottles with breastmilk, Make sure you stay comfy at home and don't stress yourself by doing too much, dedicate that time (at least) to just your baby, getting to know eachother, and learning to breastfeed. If you have any problems at all don't hesitate to talk to a lactation consultant. Make sure you have the number to one on hand.

Cynthia - posted on 01/26/2011

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Being a military mom, there should be some great support from the lactation consultant at the hospital you give birth at. In home survival will be a couple great nursing bras. Because you will experience leakage and engorgement and all sorts of craziness. Lasinoh pure lanolin for chafed/ sore nipples. Absorbent disposable nursing pads...they make some that are individually wrapped so they can easily be stashed in your diaper bag, ( I believe lasinoh makes them, in a purple box). And a simple hand pump, Avent Isis is a fantastic manual pump that is comfortable and easy to clean. Also flexible with the avent bottles so you can have someone else feed the baby if necessary. If you are in a military base, there are definitely support groups available. Use them!

Milli - posted on 01/26/2011

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There is not much you need but I would advise on keeping some frozen packs for easing the pain caused in the beginning of latching. I would also say you should buy some lansinoh cream for the same thing the chapped feeling you get is a bit painful initially and I found the lansinoh (sp) was great for that. If you plan on staying home you don't NEED a pump but if you ever plan on going out or away from LO and allowing someone else to watch her if yOU don't want to introduce formula you will need to keep some extra milk on hand for those moments.

Diane - posted on 01/26/2011

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nursing pads, lanolin and maybe a breastfeeding pillow but you don't really need one. Other than that there is no special equipment required other than what God already gave you. Good luck!

Amanda - posted on 01/26/2011

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There are very few things you REALLY need and a bunch of things that are really nice to have. You really only need your baby and your boobs but here are the things I found very helpful: A good breastfeeding pillow (like mybreastfriend) to save you backaches and help get a good latch, comfy tops since your boobs will get a lot bigger and you want easy accesss, an inexpensive hand pump for your own comfort if you get engorged, a couple of well fitting nursing bra's, some GOOD breast pads - I loved my Luxebaby wool pads which kept me warm and dry and comfortable - so much better than those horrid paper ones! If you're shy or find your baby is easily destracted, you may want a nursing cover but that is up to you :)

Angy - posted on 01/26/2011

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Ok I read most but not all comments...I would recommend Lansinoh Lanolin. Ask at your pharmacy and they can order it if they don't have it. Teach your baby to feed laying down as well as sitting up. There is a big difference in nipple position. I have bf 4 with the last 2 being EBF. Nursing Bras that are comfy..4 was the magic # for me. Breast pad with a sticky so they stick to your bra were better for me so they didn't fall out when I went to feed. I have a medela double pump ...I used it when I was getting my milk in. and when my son gets sick I can keep up my milk supply. I have never had a breast infection but for those that have they say pumping for a min to clear the ducts help. I did try a few pumps and only managed to do well with a rental medela and the one I bought. It is an expense as I hardly ever use it. I use reg pillows instead of boppy..

Sherry - posted on 01/26/2011

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Hi Leah - I see lots of people here recommended the Boppy, but not My Breast Friend. It seems nursing mothers prefer either one or the other. I liked My Breast Friend because it offered more stability than the Boppy. It's good to have both so you can choose which works best for you. Good luck!

Courtney - posted on 01/26/2011

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If you are staying home then all you really need is a good support system and breasts. Other then that having some lanolin is nice and either disposable or cotton pads for in your bra and a couple supportive nursing bras or tanks.

Row - posted on 01/26/2011

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we got a pack of the terry towelling cloth nappies and used them for sick up they were wonderful and I totally recommend them

Aicha - posted on 01/26/2011

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A Good nursing bra and lots of nursing pads a breast pump comes in handy but you can manually express the milk if you are to engorged

Jessica - posted on 01/26/2011

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I reckon the most important thing is support. Supportive partner/friend who is on board with breastfeeding. Support from a La Leche League or lactation consultant if you run into problems. (And if you do, don't just try to tough it out - get help, it's so worth it!) And a support network of people who will bring over meals, do your laundry, etc while you concentrate on the very important, more-than-fulltime work of caring for a newborn.
As for material things: comfy chair, cushions/pillow, waterbottle (sports lid best for one-handed use), snacks, book. You won't be going out much the first week or so :) I wouldn't bother with lanolin, just make sure it's warm enough in your room to be skin-to-skin with baby, then after feeds express a little bit of milk onto your nipples and let them air-dry.
When you're up to going out: nursing bra/top, breast pads, sling. A ring sling or stretchy wrap (like Moby or Hugabub) will let you feed baby handsfree, plus cover you up so know one will even realise baby is feeding! One of the joys of breastfeeding is not needing to lug around bottles and formula and worry about how to heat it up.
I also second the recommendation to read Dr McKenna's book on safe bedsharing. Almost every parent gets to the point where they are so tired they either take baby to bed or fall asleep on the couch (which IS dangerous, unlike planned bedsharing) so it's best to know how to co-sleep safely.
Enjoy :)

Aimee - posted on 01/25/2011

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You will need a nursing pillow, a cover (for when you go out), good nursing bras, a breast pump (i bought a medela hand pump which worked fine for the few times i needed it without investing major $), and nursing pads for your bras.

Celeste - posted on 01/25/2011

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I haven't read all the responses, so I'm sure some of this will be repetitive. Really, all you need are your breasts. Everything else is so subjective. Having said that, I'll share what worked for me:



-Lasinoh. This is a cream to help with sore nipples

-Breast pads, to help with the leakage (if you leak).

-Nursing bra,



Nice to have but you don't HAVE to have it:

-Boppy pillow-though some moms are OK without using one. Sometimes your own bed pillows work or nothing at all

-Going back to work? Then I'd get an electric pump.If not, then a manual would probably be OK for occasional pumping, though I would not get any pumps from Gerber, or any of the cheap pumps.



-Bottles if you're planning on going back to work. The only caveat is that I would avoid bottles for the first few weeks because of *possible* nipple confusion. Yes, some babies will do absolutely fine, but others do not. My twins are a prime example. One of them had no problem with bottles. One of them unfortunately did not. He got nipple confusion and refused to latch for almost 2 months. Once a baby has nipple confusion, it is VERY challenging to get them back to the breast. It's hard to know which ones will do fine and which ones won't. So, I usually recommend not using bottles until a few weeks old, if there's a need to.





-Support and education! One of my favorite books is "So That's What THey're THere For". Kellymom.com is a great online resource. It's evidence based research and is run by an IBCLC. Find support in other nursing mamas, attend a LLL or another breastfeeding support group.



That's all I can think of!

Amy - posted on 01/25/2011

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OH, and I recommend a MY BREST FREIND pillow instead of a BOBBY (or in addition to). the MBF pillow snaps around your waist and stays in place. Super helpful when the little one is all squirmy and you have one less thing to worry about when the pillow doesn't get away from you. Also read about 'laid-back breastfeeding' or 'biological nurturing' for the newest research on BF!

Amy - posted on 01/25/2011

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My recommendation is to find a lactation consultant and breast feeding support group. I'm also a military spouse and in germany we have great community support. We can even have a mentor mom to help us with questions. Find people to help you who you can call and ask questions about so you don't feel alone. My little one was also 4 weeks early but the lactation consultant assured me I didn't need to use formula and I never did. Once your baby is exposed to formula it changes his/her intestinal tract and interrupts the natural immunity that breastmilk has developed. Good luck!

Shauna - posted on 01/25/2011

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Congrats! I have an almost 4 month old and is EBF, and I'm a stay-at-home. It's fantastic! My doctor said if you make it through the first 2 weeks, you are good to go, and I agree. Things that might be useful:
(1) Taking a breastfeeding class. I found this extremely useful. Check your hospital.
(2) Having a friend or two who's breastfed to talk to for support/suggestions.
(3) Having the supplies:
--nipple cream (like Lansinoh) will be very helpful for the first month at least after feedings (and useful before showers to keep your nipples from being dried out by hot water)
--a hand pump (Medela Harmony is my suggestion) for occasional store trips where you leave baby with Dad, etc. with a few bottles and nipples (though you won't need the bottles until after a few weeks, but you'll want the pump to help you with engorgement!)
--nursing cover (optional)
--Boppy (optional, but really helpful at least the first month or two when your arms are seriously not used to all that holding!)
--breastpads
--nursing bras (night time ones are great to start with, too, because you won't necessarily be the size you think you'll be, so you'll want some before birth... and then you'll still use them at night...)

Remember, it shouldn't hurt. It might if you're too engorged for proper latching or is improperly latched for other reasons. It might, however, be a bit sore or uncomfortable as your nipples get used to constant use.

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BREAST PADS- I like the lasinoh ones.



LANOLIN OINTMENT- I prefer lasinoh brand. I would only buy one tube. I never needed to finish my first tube.



SEVERAL COMFORTABLE NURSING BRAS- only buy one to start out once your milk comes in you may need to go up a few cup sizes.



HAND PUMP- for engorgement or the occasional seperation from baby. I was given a Medela brand hand pump at the hospital when I delivered. Check into that before you buy you may get one free!



NURSING COVER- for nursing in public if you want a little more privacy. I like the baby au laite brand.



PLAN AHEAD OF TIME TO VISIT A LACTATION CONSULTANT SHORTLY AFTER LEAVING HOSPITAL THEY ARE YOUR BEST FRIEND IN THE BEGINING YOU MAY NOT NEED THEIR HELP BUT BE SURE YOU CAN GET AHOLD OF ONE AFTER YOU GET HOME FOR EMERGENCIES! (I breastfed my oldest till age 1 and am currently nursing baby #2 who is 2 weeks old)

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