weaning help

Domitila - posted on 07/28/2011 ( 7 moms have responded )

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i need help weaning my 13 month old, any tips would be great, she only breastfeeds when she wants to sleep, so only for her nap and at night. I really want to break away from this habit soon but i have no idea how... any help would be greatly appreciated.

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Lyndsey - posted on 08/02/2011

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Kimrose - Thank you for bringing this up.. I BF my 1st son until 15 months and he weaned easily with little encouragement from me. My second son is now 15 months and shows NO Signs of wanting to wean at all! I guess I assumed he would wean at a similar time and that I would want him to. I have decided to let him take the lead in weaning himself, because as you say it's a relatively short time in his life. He only nurses before bed right now and as a full time working mom I like the time we have together even though I never imagined myself nursing an older toddler.

Kimrose - posted on 08/01/2011

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I'm sorry to be the one to say it - but I'm SAD reading this...I know there were moments when it was *tough*/I was ready to stop nursing at that moment, but I never pushed weaning/chose child led...it's such a special thing to them and such a relatively short time in their lives they get that extra comfort, nourishment and protection...I couldn't have heard my child crying to nurse and not responded. I KNOW it's a personal decision - and I'm not downing anyone's choice - I just found it surprising that nobody asked WHY we're in such a rush? :( Even the WHO and AAP recommends 2 years now and then as long after that as Mom/Baby want as it is still *very* good for Moms and babies...I LOVE that if you've nursed 7 years total in your life, your chances of getting breast cancer are almost 0%. Lots of cool fact about the benefits if you research it.... Good luck to everyone - I'm just putting a plug in for *considering* child led weaning - you won't have to remember hearing your child cry to nurse and taking away that comfort and the benefits they get from it...of course ANY amount of nursing is good - and NOT trying to take away from that AT ALL - YAY for everyone who chooses to nurse and does their personal best!

User - posted on 07/31/2011

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Just be patient. Many babies need their mother longer than we think they should. Why be in a hurry if it is so infrequent, it appears that she is already weaning.

Melanie - posted on 07/31/2011

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Hi have just successfully weened my little boy after lactating for 22 months. It was a calm process as I did the following:
I ensured my son knew why we use plasters, when he got sore, I put a plaster on for him. After several weeks I put plasters on my breast and told him they were sore as a transition. But, i did not ween him yet, then a week later put plasters on my nipples and told him again they're painful and very sore and that he won't be able to drink, he seem to of understood well. I bought Pegasus' Calming Tablets (homopathic) which helped him to sleep easily. During the night i offered him "bunny milk" (Nesquick). During the night when he cried, i ensured i had crushed tablets (Pegasus Calming) next to my bed which I popped into his mouth, it calmed him immediately. I ensure my mom spoke about my sore boobies during the day and just before i arrived from work. When he got home i destracted him with something else. What helped a lot was that he is on the dummy. Good luck to all moms trying to wean as it is NOT an easy process.

Hope - posted on 07/31/2011

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I have been slowly weaning my daughter so that when we reach the twelve month marker she will only be nursing once a day. As another poster said slowly take away feedings starting with the one your child cares least about and work from there. But I would suggest that first you move her nursings a little away from nap time and bed time that way she can learn to fall asleep without the assistance of nursing. It will overall be a little rough for you I think because your child has to lose nursing and learn to fall asleep at the same time. But believe me it is totally doable. My monster is getting ready to nurse twice a day next month and she has never protested the loss of a feeding or had any growth problems or anything like that.

Good luck!

[deleted account]

We took away one feeding a week, starting with the least emotional feeding (usually after waking) and leaving the hardest one to the last week of weaning. My child was 13 mos when we weaned him, and he did really well. I thought he would be upset, but he wasn't. We saved the pacifier weaning for when he was 15 mos, so he still had a "security blanket" and it wasn't as emotional of a process for him.

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