Hi moms! Curious about others who are going through similar situations! My daughter was diagnosed with torticollis at 2 months, which now she is almost 9 months! We've been going to PT non stop and I've been doing stretches on her like it's going out of style, but still not enough improvement at her doctor wants! Does this seem like a horribly long process to anyone else?? Any advice, please?! Also the doctor mentioned getting her eyes checked due to her torticollis, anyone hear of that?

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Melanie - posted on 06/05/2014

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Yes, some babies have what is called 4th nerve palsy (they see double vision and tilt their heads to compensate for it) and they are often misdiagnosed with congenital torticollis. An eye exam is a good idea to help rule out what is causing your infants tilt. My son has congenital tort due to his breech position at birth.

Laura - posted on 06/01/2012

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My daughter was diagnosed at 8 weeks also and is nine months now. Her case was mild and PT was not helping her. Got her eyes checked and they were fine. Took her to a chiropractor and after 3 visits she started doing things she wasn't doing before like crawling forward, going from lying on her stomach to sitting and pulling herself to standing. I still do the stretches and they are much easier to do now. The chiropractic adjustments helped with her balance. You need to find a good chiropractor that has experience with torticollis and they should only see your child between 3 to 6 visits.

Stacy - posted on 08/06/2011

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Our daughter was diagnosed at 2 weeks and started PT at 5 weeks. We continued PT off and on (she would become functional and then start to tilt again without PT), then started doing both PT and chiropractic care at 9 months. We continued both through age 2 when the SCM simply would not loosen up. Finally at age 2 we saw an orthopedic surgeon at the Shriner's Hospital who suggested surgery to lengthen the muscle. At 23 months we had the surgery and that was 4 weeks ago. She is doing wonderfully. She is wearing a helmet and vest that straps her head to the right so that the muscle is being stretched approximately 22 hours a day and she attends physical therapy 3 times a week. The muscle has become so soft that we can barely even feel it anymore when we do her stretches 4 time a day. I did everything I could to avoid the surgery, but it has been the best thing we could have done for her. Surprisingly, we have even had an added benefit from the helmet - her head actually has re-shaped to a perfectly round head. We were advised not to get the helmet for plagiocephaly b/c the insurance wouldn't pay for it b/c it was not affecting her ability to meet develpmental milestones when she was younger. Good luck to you. Mostly I want you to know that if the end result is surgery, it is NOT awful. She recovered so fast. The surgery was at 8 am and by 5 pm I was advising her that maybe it wasn't a good idea to be jumping around just yet. I honestly don't even think she realizes anything happened b/c she never complained of pain (and refused to take the Tylenol with Codeine). I was so nervous about it and it has been our best answer.

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