Dyslexia, how do we beat it?

Rebecca - posted on 12/08/2008 ( 15 moms have responded )

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Hello, My name is Rebecca, I have 4 wonderful children and have been homeschooling for 8 years. My 3rd child who, we together, have struggled in many areas of his studies since kidergarten, was just diagnosed with severe dyslexia. The psycologist reccomends not using primary techiniques for learning. Such as with spelling throwing out the phonics method, doing all work on the computer, throwing out expectation of handwriting, and changing format for math also. Problem being, I have no idea where to start. Is there anyone out there who has a child that has struggled in the same area that has creative ways of learning to impliment. My son is a gifted child,in the 3rd grade, recognized by many, but my fear is if I don't figure this out he will only stuggle greater.

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Sarah - posted on 10/01/2009

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Hi Rebecca

Forgot to add Dyslexia is a gift, pray for god to show you how to support your child with this gift and what his is going to use it for in them, the answers will amaze you .

Sarah - posted on 10/01/2009

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Hi Ihave four boys and 3 have dyslexia, we have completed the ron davis dyslexia correction programme and it works. It is about giving them the skills to use there picture thinking minds in a word world. My 10 year old went from reading primary reads to charpter books in six months. Home schooling is great as I can use the skills learnt one on one with him which was not happening at school. They use clay to make words and pictures, you are right to stop phonics, as dyslexia is picture thinking, they think at 32 pictures per min, word thinker are about 12 per min, so need pictures more than sounds. Because they think so fast computer use is good, but they can learn to slow down and write. check out the website: www.dyslexia.com. It is hard work but the rewards are amazing.

Angela - posted on 01/20/2009

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Hi Rebecca,



There is a cure for dyslexia.



I figured out that my daughter had dyslexia at age 7 and I struggled with how to help her.  We ended up doing 2 different things.  FIrst, we went to a chiropractor who does nutritional evaluations.  He did a blood test on her and found that she had digestion,thyroid,hydration, etc. problems and put her on supplements and prescribed a diet change.  That helped her emotional stability tremendously. 



Then we went to a speech-language pathologist (Dana Merritt) www.merrittspeech.com. She ran some tests and determined that my daughter had VPD and APD (visual and auditory processing disorders).  She did visual therapy and when that was finished, she did auditory therapy.  Huge, Amazing changes took place in my daughter!  She said she can hear what people are saying now and she is clearly noticing details better (I didn't know she was having a problem in those areas).  Her eyes don't hurt or water anymore when she reads.  She loves to read and write now!   If you don't know where to go, call Dana and ask her if she knows someone in your area that practices the same way as she does.



- Angela

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Kimberlyannclark - posted on 05/30/2015

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Context clues with reading and checking math with "does the answer seem reasonable" helps a lot. Usually with dyslexia the "problem" lies with how input is received not the actual abilities of the child. Slowing down and reducing stress also helps.
-Special Education Teacher

Anna - posted on 09/12/2009

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Quoting Angela:



Hi Rebecca,






There is a cure for dyslexia.






I figured out that my daughter had dyslexia at age 7 and I struggled with how to help her.  We ended up doing 2 different things.  FIrst, we went to a chiropractor who does nutritional evaluations.  He did a blood test on her and found that she had digestion,thyroid,hydration, etc. problems and put her on supplements and prescribed a diet change.  That helped her emotional stability tremendously. 






Then we went to a speech-language pathologist (Dana Merritt) www.merrittspeech.com. She ran some tests and determined that my daughter had VPD and APD (visual and auditory processing disorders).  She did visual therapy and when that was finished, she did auditory therapy.  Huge, Amazing changes took place in my daughter!  She said she can hear what people are saying now and she is clearly noticing details better (I didn't know she was having a problem in those areas).  Her eyes don't hurt or water anymore when she reads.  She loves to read and write now!   If you don't know where to go, call Dana and ask her if she knows someone in your area that practices the same way as she does.






- Angela





I agree with Rebecca: there is a cure! I believe hydration is important, as well as balancing the body's nutrition.



I have seen someone helped with eft (emotional freedom technique):



http://www.emofree.com/Dyslexia/dyslexia...



http://www.emofree.com/dyslexia/dyslexia...



There are also helps with the body's electrical system such as the Wayne Cook posture, which was developed specifically to help dislexic people:



 Part 1


Part 2





(hope Donna Eden is not "too far out" for anyone)



Also the Cross Crawl exercise (an exagerated march with the opposite side arm and leg employed at the same time).



 



 

Sarah - posted on 02/22/2009

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When I realized my daughter has dyslexia, she was 9, and struggling through 4th grade. I found a TON of information at http://www.dys-add.com/nowknow.html, and highly recommend it. They even have testimonies of successful dyslexics, and areas they are more likely to excel. I also would encourage you to check out Susan Barton's method. I beleive there is a link on the above website to find out more-it's amazing the way she breaks down everything. I was skeptical when I ordered the info DVD, but wound up pretty impressed.

Marcia - posted on 02/20/2009

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I use playdough and we make letters and words. It has been huge in making reading and letters fun again for him. It helps him tell the difference between difficult letters and which way they face. I also recomend The Gift of Dyslexia, it has been a great source for us and given us wonderful ideas on how to help him more.

Renee - posted on 02/18/2009

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Hi Rebecca. My 10 yr old has it. I read this fantastic book call The Gift of Dyslexia by Ronald D. Davis. It really helped to understand it better and has lots of pratical things that you can do. Here is the isbn no. if your interested: 0-285-63412-7. I hope it helps!

Regards, Renee`

[deleted account]

you helped me! My daughter struggles with many things you mentioned (we are in the process of getting her tested) and you had some great ideas. Thanks. She also stuggles so much with the vowel sounds. I like your ideas.

Vicki - posted on 01/19/2009

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Something else I forgot - for the alphabet and numbers to help him practice determining the direction the letter or number should face, write them on cards and then have him put then in one of three columns - faces left, faces right or neither. For instance, 2,3, 4,7,9 face left; 5,6, face right; 0,1,8 neither or middle or whatever makes sense. Well, 1 whenever it's hand written! If he has trouble with the concept of left and right, practice determining that first, of course! I showed my son how his left hand makes an "L". Then you just have to make sure he knows the direction L faces, lol! Sorry for the long posts - hope I helped.

Vicki - posted on 01/19/2009

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My 9 year old son has moderate dyslexia. He goes to therapy for two hours once a week. I home school him because it is the best option for us - I can stay focused on what he needs to learn instead of just pushing him on whenever he hasn't learned the concept.



For spelling, help him to find the hidden smaller words inside the bigger words, e.g., together is to get her. It's very important for him to understand the sounds of the vowels and blends. Put them on flash cards and on the back, put a word that they are used in and drill him daily - e.g., o - octopus, a - apple, e - elephant, ai - rain, oa - boat. When dictating sentences to my son and he can't spell a word because he doesn't know which vowels to use, for instance if the word were pain, I'd say "ai, rain" and then he knows he need to use ai, not ae, as in ate. Dictate simple sentences to him with blends or vowels such as oa, ea, etc. once he gets the cards memorized. Use magnetic letters for spelling words - hand him all the letters in the word and then ask him to spell it. Use shaving cream and let him write his words in it. For example: teacher - my teacher drinks tea - tea is the hidden word in teacher. Vowels are the hardest for my son, he has an easier thime with blends. Has your son been tested to see what his weakest area and his strongest area is? My son's weakest is auditory processing and strongest is visual processing.



Even with all this you will probably still have to read a lot of his assignments to him just to keep up a normal schedule. My son attends a tutorial for science and history and I do a lot of the reading to him. However, he is able to retain a lot of the information by doing this. The science textbook is so interestingly written that it keeps him focused on it. He also has ADD, so focusing is a battle for him. Comprehension is something dyslexics will struggle with, and I find that if I read to him his comprehension goes up. Sometimes I make him read certain passages anyway, but if he says he doesn't remember what he read I read it to him again.



I feel for you because I know what you are dealing with - if at all possible I would check to see if there is a place that does therapy for dyslexia in your area. I live near Nashville and we use Dyslexia Centers of TN. I think it may be part of Dyslexia Centers of America so check online and see if there is something out there. God Bless!

Teresa - posted on 01/16/2009

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lol

great doctor.. Yes the computer will be awesome and really help out.. BUT don't get rid of the others.. Phonics will still work out.. and so will handwriting. I use SOS (switched on Schoolhouse for grade levels above 3rd), Hooked on Phonics for all 4 of mine. And yes All of us have dyslexia. My disabled son has swelling in the brain (severe TBI traumatic brain injury).. My oldest is doing 5th grade in math on SOS, SOS for Science for 6th grade, lifePac's for 5th grade language arts, etc.. just see what will work best for each subject. Handwriting without tears program is awesome.. It really works and I can't say enough on that one. There is a series for history (i believe) and it's called "draw and write" it's history, language arts, writing, drawing all in one book. That works for my disabled son more than anything.. he is very creative that way.

good luck.. hope this helps



Don't keep adding things till he has it down with no problem what so ever.. (but i'm sure you know that after 8 yrs) :)

[deleted account]

I also have mild dyslexia, but wasn't diagnosed til I was 15. Now my daughter in third grade I am pretty sure has it. i have thought this since grade 1, as K was a tough year and I thought she was struggling due to that. Now though it is obvious she has a problem. We do get discouraged, but I have definatley found cursive writing is better than printing. Also large print and math problems that are spread out on a page, not too many on a page. These things might help. I also don't make a big deal out of backwards letters/numbers or when she writes starting from the right side of the page. If she does the latter I just mention that it is supposed to go the other way, no big deal. I read a good book called Teaching the Dyslexic Child and it helped alot too. Hope you figure it out.

Jennifer - posted on 01/11/2009

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I wish I could help, I understand how difficult dyslexia can be.  My brother was diagnosed as well, but that was over 15 years ago (he's 23 now) and at the time we didn't really know how to deal with it.  My brother would read 1 line and the words would jumble up on him and he didn't understand what he was reading.  Now he has a bible I bought him, and not only is he reading it, but he understands what he's reading and doing his best to put it into practice.

Krista - posted on 12/09/2008

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I wish I had an answer for you. My son is in the 2nd grade and is also dylexic but very mild. I am fortunate enough that my husband also has mild dyslexia and when I struggle with teaching him something, my husband takes over. I can't figure out how he explains it but it works. I wish I could figure out how their minds work and pass it along to you but I'm out of the circle. I'll pray that you find a solution and that your son excels in all he does.

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