HOW TO SEPERATE GOD AND SANTA

Kyle - posted on 12/19/2009 ( 36 moms have responded )

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Would like to hear other moms input on letting children believe in Santa.

I am debating on how to go about telling my children about Santa. They know santa is a big part of Christmas for alot of people and is also the birthday of Jesus. Basicly I am afraid if I let my children believe in Santa then when they find out he is not real then they might think the same about Jesus since they are both a part of Christmas. My husband has no worries about this but i just don't want them to lose faith in God and think he is not real just because Santa is not real. My daughter is 5 and already believes in Santa but i havent told her any stories about him "flying around delivering presents to little boys and girls and stuff" she just knows he is a "special" person that comes around Christmas time.

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Angie - posted on 12/23/2009

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Saint Nicholas was a real person who went around giving gifts, but as time went on, he has gotten nicknames such as Santa Claus, Kris Kringle, etc. He was fulfilling God's work and the example of the wise men to love others more than yourself.

Heather - posted on 12/19/2009

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I am the same way Kyle. My kids know that Santa isn't real. They know that some parents teach their kids that he is real, but i want them to trust us so I will not lie to them about it. I completely agree that if we tell them Santa is real and they find out he's not it could seriously damage our testimony about Jesus. Also there is the fact that if we teach them Santa isn't a lie, but just a fun thing to do that isn't true, then we teach them that not telling the truth is fun. I just can't do that. Another mom posted a link earlier this week to a sermon about this. I am working on making a more friendly version of it. It had some great info, but wasn't said in love.

Martha - posted on 12/24/2009

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My 11 year old asked why people who belief in God also Belief in Santa I explained to him that sometimes it is easier for people to belief in Santa and that Santa gives Gifts too but God Gave us the Best Gift ever. and Santa is helping some people believe in giving and this sometimes may lead them closer to God. My father who is a Christian plays Santa at Christmas and this is what he has always taught us.

Heather - posted on 12/22/2009

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Jill that was a very touching story! I have told my children of the real Saint Nicholas, but I just kind of went over the basics (he lived a long time ago and wanted to share God's love with the people in his town and gave gifts to them). Great scripture too!

Jill - posted on 12/22/2009

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Thank you Heather, That is a good scripture, I feel that way too!
I came across another: Proverbs 30:8
"Keep falsehood and lies far from me; give me neither poverty nor riches, but give me only my daily bread." So...
The key about Christmas is to teach our children also to be thankful AND satisfied with what they have so God's contentment can flow in their hearts and therefore pass along with generosity to others. Without getting tangled in the media and hype of all the presents and to always remember that Jesus is God's greatest gift to the world and Santa can't even come close to that one!

another link with helpful truth about St. Nicholas... from Dr. Charles Stanley:
http://www.intouch.org/site/c.cnKBIPNuEo...

This above link is the only version of Saint Nicholas is the only story I wish to relay to our son.
I don't wish to pass along that deception of flying deer and elves and about the materialism of what the modern Santa represents. He may be all good and fun to some, but I remember being kinda creeped out as a little girl, that some old guy who I have never met is going to come in our house while I was sleeping, even if he did bring presents.

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Tiffany - posted on 12/24/2009

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My little girl is 2. We told her that Christmas is Jesus' birthday (we will sing Happy Birthday in the morning before we open gifts just like we did for her birthday 12-12), she know that Jesus does not live here anymore and that is why we get to open his gifts. For us Santa comes only if she has been a good girl and leave a special gift. So far it seems to be working, she is walking around the house telling Jesus happy birthday!

Vanessa - posted on 12/24/2009

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I tell my kids God created Santa. God created all things good. Santa is God's helper. Jesus is God son. Jesus is whats important because its his birthday and he shares his presents with everyone. Thats what Santa is here for, to help Jesus share his gifts. =)

Patricia - posted on 12/23/2009

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I totally agree let them be kids we make simple things complex with love & kindness raise your kids it doesn't come with a manual trial & errors will occur

Sharyn - posted on 12/23/2009

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I have two little ones who have started to talk about "santa". I now talk about how santa is a bit of fun at christmas, but what the real meaning is for us. We talk about how it's baby Jesus birthday, and try and not have santa be the focus.

Heather - posted on 12/22/2009

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Jill here is the scripture that makes the biggest difference to me:
Romans 1:25
They exchanged the truth of God for a lie, and worshiped and served created things rather than the Creator—who is forever praised. Amen.

Santa is a created thing, and he is worshiped and served by many. We serve Santa by buying toys and putting his name on them. We serve him by dressing up and pretending to be him. By telling others about him. We worship him by singing about him, and to him. And in the end, Santa is a lie. That scripture just speaks volumes about this issue for me.

Kathy - posted on 12/22/2009

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I don't think people should lie to there children so I think they should be told the true meaning of Christmas and explain that Santa is a make believe person. Tell them the story of the man called Santa in long ago who did give presents to good little boys and girls but that people now give gifts in rememberance of the birth of Baby Jesus

Jill - posted on 12/22/2009

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I have the same dilemma, my husband & I love the Lord, and our 4 1/2 yr old son has been asking questions about Santa Claus (like how Santa gets in our house) and I am so confused about how to respond... because the spiritual leader in the home, my husband, quickly answered him by saying that we are going to leave a door open for Santa, and leave him cookies and milk. I felt horrible about that, because I feel it is lying to our child and if we get him believing this, then later when he finds out there is no Santa, will he think what we've been teaching him about Jesus is a lie too?

We have taken great pains to send him to a Christian Pre-K, do other Christian parents lead their kids to believe there is a Santa? I asked 2 moms in my bible study yesterday and they both let their kids believe that yes there is a Santa... So maybe there is no harm in it? (one of them, her husband is a pastor) I have been researching Saint Nicholas, and there are of course, some weird misnomers attached with Santa Claus.

I just really am torn... my son has been in tears lately because he is so worried if he is being good and sincerely wants to know how Santa knows if he is being good or bad? After a long moment of looking into Gabriel's teary eyes, I said maybe Santa prays to God and God tells him because God is the only one who has that power to know us and every hair on our head.
UGGG... I just really wanted to tell him the truth. I don't like the fact that Gabriel might be "being good" so he will get presents, geez, talk about performance orientated guilt! But I don't have the husbands support so I can't yet.
But if there was a biblical foundation to Santa... Then maybe I could go with it, but what aspects of Santa do you say isn't true and what aspects can you say is real. Like flying reindeer or elves or...

What scripture can I present to my husband first (without disrespecting him) and then to our boy, to get this story set right and in God's will?

Well, I will be really happy to hear what ya think as fellow christian Moms!

Wanda - posted on 12/22/2009

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I struggled with this issue too for a long time. What I ended up doing is allowing myself to let them believe. I've made it clear to them all that Jesus is the reason for the season and although they believe in Santa I've explained to them that he is nothing more than God's helper. I explained that he gives gifts in memory of that day thousands of years ago when the wise men brought gifts to the baby Jesus! That is the reason they get gift. We don't put all the emphasis on Santa and as my boys grew up, I have a 16 year old, a 13 year old, a 6 year old and a 5 year old, the time came for them when it was obvious to them through the media, through friends or whatever that Santa was not a real person but a fictional one and my 16 year old didn't come to resent me or think that I somehow lied to him. He encourages his lil brother's desire to believe too! My 6 year old has made observations about how Santa can possibly deliver gifts all around the world in one night.....and my response to him is and was that " God can do all things" nothing is impossible for God. When he saw a picture of Santa standing near a fireplace with fire in it he asked how did Santa could have possible gotten down the fire, and I reminded them of Shadrack, Meshack and Abendigo and if God could keep them from buring...doesn't he think God could do that for someone else? I just point them back to the Lord everytime. People tell me I shouldn't encourage the kids about thier faith in Santa but I see it as nothing more than innocent child-like fantasy and that is good for them!

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We are a Santa free household. Most of my friends (all Christian) are not... especially my pastor. ;) My friend wrote a cute children's book called Santa Celebrates Jesus's Birthday... written by Tessie Spore. It's one way that many of the families I know have dealt w/ the issue. :)

Rebekah - posted on 12/22/2009

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As for what Jennifer Rochelle said; I met a 10 year old girl recently that had still believed in Santa until someone at school told her differently (like within the past 2 months) and she was crushed. As an early childhood educator myself, I have found that ALL CHILDREN ARE DIFFERENT. It is far better to simply tell your kids the truth from the get go.

Rebekah - posted on 12/22/2009

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Growing up I never believed Santa was real. That said, my parents incorporated Santa things in to Christmas and we all had fun with it. As a christian I believe it is wrong to lie to your child (as lying is sin). I also believe that allowing your child to believe a lie and not correct it is sin as well. I have a 3 year old and last year he was given a book for Christmas that has Santa in it. I would read the book to him and on the page where Santa was I would say, "That's Santa". This year, we recieved the Rudolf dvd from a friend. I told him, "Santa is a fun part of Christmas but he isn't real".Also for Christmas this year I bought him Veggie Tales Saint Nicholas A Story Of Joyful Giving. This story is important and wonderful for children b/c Saint Nicholas was a real man who loved Jesus. You could research it and tell your children the story and talk about ways we give to each other and ways we can give to other b/c we love Jesus (and tell them that Santa is a take off on thSaint Nick but that he isn't real). The 2 stories together for Christmas are great b/c Saint Nicholas gave gifts to show his love for Jesus and Jesus gave himself to show God's love for us. In my honest opinion, Santa only serves the purpose of making kids greedy, but Jesus came to give us life and that we will have life ABUNDANTLY in order to give to others! MERRY CHRISTMAS!

Christi - posted on 12/21/2009

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Hi Kyle, I grew up in a house that believed in Jesus but didn't have a nativity set. ALL of the Christmas presents came from "Santa", none were from Mom and Dad. It was hard when I learned the truth. I didn't want that for my children. This is the way I handled it: Santa brought one present and maybe some stocking stuffers. He also ate the cookies and drank the milk. The rest of the gifts were from Mom and Dad. We read the Nativity Story to them often, each Christmas season. We emphasized Jesus like this: one of the nativity sets was one that was safe for the kids. Each child was given a wiseman and/or camel to take care of. Each wiseman/camel traveled around the house (moved once per day) anywhere the child wanted to put it, except in their original set. On Christmas day we told the story again and brought the wisemen and camels to Bethlehem. When it came time to tell them about Santa, we (husband and I together) told them that Santa is the Spirit of Giving that is in everyone, so that makes them a Santa too. Then we thought of someone we knew that might need a gift from Santa and the kids helped us pick and wrap a present to give them.

Joyce - posted on 12/21/2009

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I never talked about Santa in my home never put his name on any gifts my children never new him except what they heard at school or from other children and I would answer their questions when they asked but i never lived the lie that he bought gifts to my house. My children never missed out on the gifts they always knew it was Jesus birthday and we celebrated it by giving gifts as he did. I never made Santa an issue and it never came up. My children knew he was a man dressed in red outfit.

A Child Of The - posted on 12/21/2009

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Kyle, there will be plenty of moments where you will be able to share the goodness of God to your children and explain the gift that He sent. I'm sure you have a spiritual home you and your family attend weekly, maybe they can assist you more on how to explain this to your kids. In the mean time, have faith in God that He will download an innovative idea in you to explain to your children. You will be consider a Proverbs 31 woman & mom.





Be blessed and Merry Christmas- You all are beautiful.

Marley - posted on 12/21/2009

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Letting a child believe in Santa will not take away from the true meaning of Christmas if you explain it the right way. I loved the Christmas season as a child and still love it now and honestly, I don't feel it is fair to tell your children right away that Santa isn't real. They would probably end up ruining it for another child at school..that is how I found out. Just say that Santa is helping celebrate Jesus' birthday :)

Heather - posted on 12/21/2009

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Quoting Megan:

This is a great thread. I love hearing everyone's thoughts. I found this blog post to be well thought out and articulate. I hope you guys get a chance to read this: http://www.desiringgod.org/Blog/2141_thi... May everyone have a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!


Thanks Megan! This is very much along the same lines of the lesson I am working on. Thanks for sharing!

Patrina - posted on 12/21/2009

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Quoting Patrina: I totally agree with Jennifer (very well done by the way).  Santa is the spirit of generosity at Christmas time.  He gives gifts just like the Three Kings did on the Epiphany.  My advice-teach it all, talk about advent and the story of the Nativity.  Let Santa come and bring them a gift.  They will not become confused-just reinforce that Christmas is about the birth of our savior and the rest they will figure out.



Quoting Jennifer:

I was also conflicted about this because I don't want him to think Jesus is "made up" like Santa - the character that flies around delivering gifts and has elves working for him. Our family practices Advent before Christmas and in reading an Advent book we have (A Family Advent: Keeping the Savior in the Season) it had a story about the history of Santa Claus, or Saint Nicholas and how he came to be known as Santa Claus. Since we've been trying to find a way to explain who Santa is and relate it to Christ, we were happy to find this! We read this to our son so that he knows Saint Nicholas was real person who lived and died and had a heart to give, just as Jesus wants us to do for others. So I thought I would share the story out of this book in case you'd like to use it in your family.

The Story of Saint Nicholas (from A Family Advent: Keeping the Savior in the Season)

Did you know that Santa Claus was really a Christian saint named Saint Nicholas? Who lived just three hundred years after the death of Christ? You'll have to decide whether you think he wore a big red suit or not, but there's a good reason why we mention him at Christmastime. Saint Nicholas was born into a very wealthy family in Greece. His parents died when he was very young and he spent the rest of his life giving away every bit of his inheritance in Christian charity. He particularly loved children and became known as a miracle worker. One legend tells the story of a father who was too poor to give his three daughters a dowry. Not having a dowry meant the daughters probably wouldn't find husbands, and if they didn't marry, they'd be sold into slavery! Mysteriously, on three different nights over the years, Saint Nicholas tossed a bag of gold through an open window into the poor man's house, and each time it landed in the girls' stockings, which were hanging by the fire to dry. So the daughters ended up being able to find husbands, and the tradition of hanging stockings began. And since that time, Saint Nicholas became known as a giver of gifts.

Saint Nicholas died in 343 AD, but that didn't stop the miracles from happening. The people whose lives had been changed by this humble follower of Christ declared December 6th as the feast of Saint Nicholas, and each year, on the eve of that day, they would throw candies and small gifts through doors of their neighbors' houses. Children in Holland started leaving carrots and hay in their shoes for the saint's horse, hoping the spirit of Saint Nicholas would leave them small gifts in exchange.

So how did Saint Nicholas' name change to Santa Claus? The German pronunciation of Saint Nicholas is Sankt Niklaus, which got a little mixed up and became Santa Claus as the legend got passed on through the generations. Whether you like to think of Santa Claus as a man in a big red suit or a saint who lived long ago doesn't really matter. What's important is that we recognize his example of true giving and faithfulness in that way the Jesus teaches us. Maybe this Christmas you can help spread the spirit of Saint Nicholas and leave a caring surprise at someone's door or in the mail.





 





 

Patrina - posted on 12/21/2009

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Quoting Jennifer:

I was also conflicted about this because I don't want him to think Jesus is "made up" like Santa - the character that flies around delivering gifts and has elves working for him. Our family practices Advent before Christmas and in reading an Advent book we have (A Family Advent: Keeping the Savior in the Season) it had a story about the history of Santa Claus, or Saint Nicholas and how he came to be known as Santa Claus. Since we've been trying to find a way to explain who Santa is and relate it to Christ, we were happy to find this! We read this to our son so that he knows Saint Nicholas was real person who lived and died and had a heart to give, just as Jesus wants us to do for others. So I thought I would share the story out of this book in case you'd like to use it in your family.

The Story of Saint Nicholas (from A Family Advent: Keeping the Savior in the Season)

Did you know that Santa Claus was really a Christian saint named Saint Nicholas? Who lived just three hundred years after the death of Christ? You'll have to decide whether you think he wore a big red suit or not, but there's a good reason why we mention him at Christmastime. Saint Nicholas was born into a very wealthy family in Greece. His parents died when he was very young and he spent the rest of his life giving away every bit of his inheritance in Christian charity. He particularly loved children and became known as a miracle worker. One legend tells the story of a father who was too poor to give his three daughters a dowry. Not having a dowry meant the daughters probably wouldn't find husbands, and if they didn't marry, they'd be sold into slavery! Mysteriously, on three different nights over the years, Saint Nicholas tossed a bag of gold through an open window into the poor man's house, and each time it landed in the girls' stockings, which were hanging by the fire to dry. So the daughters ended up being able to find husbands, and the tradition of hanging stockings began. And since that time, Saint Nicholas became known as a giver of gifts.

Saint Nicholas died in 343 AD, but that didn't stop the miracles from happening. The people whose lives had been changed by this humble follower of Christ declared December 6th as the feast of Saint Nicholas, and each year, on the eve of that day, they would throw candies and small gifts through doors of their neighbors' houses. Children in Holland started leaving carrots and hay in their shoes for the saint's horse, hoping the spirit of Saint Nicholas would leave them small gifts in exchange.

So how did Saint Nicholas' name change to Santa Claus? The German pronunciation of Saint Nicholas is Sankt Niklaus, which got a little mixed up and became Santa Claus as the legend got passed on through the generations. Whether you like to think of Santa Claus as a man in a big red suit or a saint who lived long ago doesn't really matter. What's important is that we recognize his example of true giving and faithfulness in that way the Jesus teaches us. Maybe this Christmas you can help spread the spirit of Saint Nicholas and leave a caring surprise at someone's door or in the mail.


 

Nikki - posted on 12/21/2009

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I grew up believing in Santa, the Toothfairy, the Easter bunny...the whole nine yards....

The way that I've chosen to believe about all of the above is that it's OK to let children practice and nurture their imagination!!! The way we've chosen to explain Santa to my children is as follows:

Santa was real...long long ago Chris Kringle did exist and he did bring gifts to children. But now in this day of age, it is HIS SPIRIT OF GIVING that we all must carry on! We are allowing our 5yr old daughter and almost 4yr old son to believe in Santa...and when the time comes and they are old enough to determine that Santa at the mall...isn't real... Then we can explain the love and caring that the "real Santa from long ago" had & wanted his name to carry on the story of...that it is better to give, than to receive and that Jesus is REAL! What he did for us is REAL and that he wants us to do the same thing "Santa" does. GIVE!!!! And LOVE everyone!

Imagination is a wonderful thing!!! Children shouldn't be robbed of the joys of believing in all of the above and if it is handled properly, your children will always believe what you tell them and trust you. (And I had to explain this to my mother who by the way allowed us to believe in Santa as children and now believes the same way you posted your comment) Pray about it and allow the Lord to give you the answer that will bring you peace of mind and be careful who's advice you take...I had to even stop listening to family & friends and start listening to hear from God...

Merry Christmas and Blessings Always!

Christie - posted on 12/21/2009

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My husband and I wanted our children to know the true meaning of christmas, but also enjoy being a child, so what we did was talk about the birth of baby jesus, and on christmas with our dinner we would have a birthday cake for jesus and sing happy birthday to him. And then for santa I would do was let my daughter pick a gift she would like from santa and it could only be one small gift fro him, then santa would do a game with gift he would hide it somewhere in the home and she had to look for it, when she was able to read santa would leave notes and she would follow his directions to find the gift she loved this part, and then the stocking I told her santa and god worked together and in the stocking is love and care for another year, we never really put a big fuse over santa but let her be able to enjoy what other kids enjoyed this yr she is 10 and she asked me if santa was real, because the kids in her class were talking and things were starting not to make since, so I told her that santa is a spirt, and was once a true person who was giving gifts to kids who had nothing and it went from there, but the spirt of christmas is around us, thats why magic seems to happen for those in need.
And she was so happy to hear this, and is still pretending not to let those who belive in him she is keeping the secret.

Kyle - posted on 12/20/2009

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Quoting A Child Of The:

Kyle, my husband and I have explained the birth of Jesus as the best gift from God. God sent His only son down to change the world so that we all can live together in peace because of the birth of Jesus. And because God sent His ONLY son, we are to give gifts to others (kind words, meal, song). Although we have a list for Santa Claus, God is the distributer of all the gifts for instance, when we write our wish list to Santa, we mail it to Santa and whatever he can't afford or do with his elves, he sends it to God and God sends the gift to Santa and he distributes them to all of us.

This story has worked for 20 years; we've gotten a little better with our story telling but as the years went by, our 20 year old has realize that the gifts are actually from God. He blessed mom and dad with jobs, they were able to take the wish list into consideration and santa with all his wonders help out as well.

My other two children are small and my 20 year old helps with the story. I pray that you would find a way to combine the story of Jesus and His Father along with Santa and Christmas.

Be blessed and Merry Christmas


Thank you, this is along the lines of what i was thinking about doing. Just explaining to them that their gifts are a gift from God but Santa just delivers them, but then i am back to the delema of when they find out Santa is not real then what would stop them from thinking God is not real.

A Child Of The - posted on 12/20/2009

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Kyle, my husband and I have explained the birth of Jesus as the best gift from God. God sent His only son down to change the world so that we all can live together in peace because of the birth of Jesus. And because God sent His ONLY son, we are to give gifts to others (kind words, meal, song). Although we have a list for Santa Claus, God is the distributer of all the gifts for instance, when we write our wish list to Santa, we mail it to Santa and whatever he can't afford or do with his elves, he sends it to God and God sends the gift to Santa and he distributes them to all of us.



This story has worked for 20 years; we've gotten a little better with our story telling but as the years went by, our 20 year old has realize that the gifts are actually from God. He blessed mom and dad with jobs, they were able to take the wish list into consideration and santa with all his wonders help out as well.



My other two children are small and my 20 year old helps with the story. I pray that you would find a way to combine the story of Jesus and His Father along with Santa and Christmas.



Be blessed and Merry Christmas

Jennifer - posted on 12/20/2009

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I was also conflicted about this because I don't want him to think Jesus is "made up" like Santa - the character that flies around delivering gifts and has elves working for him. Our family practices Advent before Christmas and in reading an Advent book we have (A Family Advent: Keeping the Savior in the Season) it had a story about the history of Santa Claus, or Saint Nicholas and how he came to be known as Santa Claus. Since we've been trying to find a way to explain who Santa is and relate it to Christ, we were happy to find this! We read this to our son so that he knows Saint Nicholas was real person who lived and died and had a heart to give, just as Jesus wants us to do for others. So I thought I would share the story out of this book in case you'd like to use it in your family.

The Story of Saint Nicholas (from A Family Advent: Keeping the Savior in the Season)

Did you know that Santa Claus was really a Christian saint named Saint Nicholas? Who lived just three hundred years after the death of Christ? You'll have to decide whether you think he wore a big red suit or not, but there's a good reason why we mention him at Christmastime. Saint Nicholas was born into a very wealthy family in Greece. His parents died when he was very young and he spent the rest of his life giving away every bit of his inheritance in Christian charity. He particularly loved children and became known as a miracle worker. One legend tells the story of a father who was too poor to give his three daughters a dowry. Not having a dowry meant the daughters probably wouldn't find husbands, and if they didn't marry, they'd be sold into slavery! Mysteriously, on three different nights over the years, Saint Nicholas tossed a bag of gold through an open window into the poor man's house, and each time it landed in the girls' stockings, which were hanging by the fire to dry. So the daughters ended up being able to find husbands, and the tradition of hanging stockings began. And since that time, Saint Nicholas became known as a giver of gifts.

Saint Nicholas died in 343 AD, but that didn't stop the miracles from happening. The people whose lives had been changed by this humble follower of Christ declared December 6th as the feast of Saint Nicholas, and each year, on the eve of that day, they would throw candies and small gifts through doors of their neighbors' houses. Children in Holland started leaving carrots and hay in their shoes for the saint's horse, hoping the spirit of Saint Nicholas would leave them small gifts in exchange.

So how did Saint Nicholas' name change to Santa Claus? The German pronunciation of Saint Nicholas is Sankt Niklaus, which got a little mixed up and became Santa Claus as the legend got passed on through the generations. Whether you like to think of Santa Claus as a man in a big red suit or a saint who lived long ago doesn't really matter. What's important is that we recognize his example of true giving and faithfulness in that way the Jesus teaches us. Maybe this Christmas you can help spread the spirit of Saint Nicholas and leave a caring surprise at someone's door or in the mail.

[deleted account]

wow....who says Santa isn't real. the "real" st nicholas was an actual person. when my children were little, Santa came to visit every year and we also had a birthday party for baby Jesus to help teach them what Christmas was about. Not a one of them doubted their faith once finding out that Santa isn't just one person but a concept that lives in the heart of each and every one of us. It helps us to remember about the joy of giving...that someone loves us enough to overlook our faults...you know...that unconditional love our Lord and Savior has cleansed us with. Santa/Father Christmas/Sinter Klaus/St. Nicholas, I believe, helps little ones who can't truly grasp the best gift ever from our Lord and still experience Christmas....the excitement, the joy.... while still centering on the birth of our Lord and Savior....
As a parent of older kiddos..... i look back and think over some of the things i worried about needlessly..... this might be one of them. for example: when my husband went to desert storm, my 2 1/2 yr old daughter kept asking me if her daddy was going to come home. I was very conflicted about what to say... wanted to tell her the truth, etc. well guess what....that's not what she needed from me. she needed to know everything was going to be okay. she didn't understand my long explanations...couldn't grasp the concept of why daddy may not come home.... big lesson learned there. i needed to let her be a child..with all that comes with it. blessedly, her daddy did come home. had he not.... we would have crossed that bridge when we came to it....letting her know everything was going to be okay. sometimes we over think things and expect kids to have grown up ideology. it's okay to let them enjoy..... Merry Blessed Christmas!!

Jennifer - posted on 12/19/2009

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I forgot I wanted to share an activity a friend of mine did with her son this year that I want to try to. They made a list of "What would Jesus ask Santa for for Christmas?" She said it really helped her family move past the toys and gadgets and be more thoughtful about gifts in general.

Jennifer - posted on 12/19/2009

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Our family has chosen not to "celebrate" Santa and try to keep Christmas Christ centered too. That being said though I do not believe that children who grow up believing in Santa have a difficult time seperating his makebeliefness from Jesus and his realness. As an early childhood educator I look at it from the knowledge that ALL children go through a developmental stage where they learn to decsern real from make believe, and they learn to do so on an individual basis, not grouping things together. A very young child is going to believe everything is real regardless of what you may explain to them. To a young child Bob of Veggie Tales is very much as real as you or I. Around four years of age they begin to question real and make believe but as thier imaginations are developing they still succumb eaisly to believing what ever "stories" they are influenced to believe. As they get older this develops into a more mature belief and understanding system. This is why ALL children eventually "stop believing in Santa" or find a real relationship in the "real" Jesus. I respect the many Christian families who also include Santa in thier holiday celebration and don't think any of them have to worry that it will mess with thier childrens eventual belief in Christ. I do belief though it messes with the joy a person can have in celebrating Christmas, as when we look toward something other then Christ we get distracted. I do love the holiday image of Santa kneeling at the manger worshiping the baby Jesus and that is what I keep in my heart when dealing with Santa and my kids. We are teaching the historical story of Santa and trying to use him as a sort of model for loving gift giving. We emphasize when we read or see or hear something about Santa about how he is a "story" or someone is "pretending" to be him. Santa does not leave gifts under our tree and our children don't "ask" Santa for the gifts they are hoping for. We do let our children read Santa stories and even sit on his lap for a picture if they want, but keep up the empasis that he is just a part of what people like about Christmas and NOT what Christmas is. Then we try to spend our family time celebrating Christmas with Christ at the heart of it!

Heather - posted on 12/19/2009

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I will post it when I'm done. I still have a ways to go though. I'm hoping to have it done on Tuesday.

Emily - posted on 12/19/2009

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Quoting Heather:

I am the same way Kyle. My kids know that Santa isn't real. They know that some parents teach their kids that he is real, but i want them to trust us so I will not lie to them about it. I completely agree that if we tell them Santa is real and they find out he's not it could seriously damage our testimony about Jesus. Also there is the fact that if we teach them Santa isn't a lie, but just a fun thing to do that isn't true, then we teach them that not telling the truth is fun. I just can't do that. Another mom posted a link earlier this week to a sermon about this. I am working on making a more friendly version of it. It had some great info, but wasn't said in love.


I would love to see your version of it.  I still have a lot of time before my daughter starts asking questions but could you send it to me through a private message please (unless you post it on here)?  ;)

Leslie - posted on 12/19/2009

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I agree. The point of celebrating Christmas is Jesus and we as christians need to emphasize that to our kids. My kids are 5 and 6 and they know that the idea of saint nicholas began when someone went around the villages in Europe around christmas time and gave gifts to children. Today the idea is that someone dresses up just for the fun of it. God gave us the greatest gift to show us his love. It is good to give others and each other gifts. They were concerned about how he(santa) fits in the chimney with his big tummy and thats when I had to tell them the truth. Now they know, and its not a big deal here.

Kyle - posted on 12/19/2009

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Thank you, I am glad to know that i am not alone on this. when you finish your version i would love to see it. I am not sure what i am going to do with this situation. i might just put it off for the next 5 days and hope nothing is mentioned about it, that way i have all of next year to figure out how i want to approach this.

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