The NDP Calls For New National Social Housing - Bill C-400

Northern - posted on 02/28/2013 ( 6 moms have responded )

731

0

38

February 27, 2013

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Today, the Honourable Tony Clement, President of the Treasury Board, announced that the Harper Government will not support Bill C-400, which is NDP legislation that calls on the federal government to create a new national social housing strategy. Human Resources and Skills Development Canada estimates that the price tag for this legislation will be at minimum $5.5 billion per year.

“Week after week, we see Mulcair’s NDP continuing to demonstrate to Canadians their dangerous and risky spending schemes,” said Minister Clement. “At a time when we are trying to return to balanced Budgets, our Government will not support this risky and dangerous NDP spending scheme that will result in higher taxes or increased deficits,” said Minister Clement.

The NDP’s Bill C-400, which will be voted upon in the House of Commons today, calls for the establishment of a new national social housing strategy. This program would be on top of the $12 billion dollars the Government of Canada transfers to the provinces each year under the Canada Social Transfer. And, it is on top of the hundreds of millions of dollars the Government spends on affordable housing and homelessness each and every year.

“The Harper Government will continue to focus on what matters to Canadians – jobs, growth and long-term prosperity,” said Minister Clement. “We will not support a new spending program that will justify Thomas Mulcair imposing a $21 billion carbon tax on hardworking Canadian families,” added Minister Clement.

http://www.conservative.ca/?p=2811

6 Comments

View replies by

Northern - posted on 03/02/2013

731

0

38

i'm glad your province of Nova Scotia provides easier evictions.

I think Ontario is the hardest place to have any business. The Liberal Party is responsible for that.

The former Progressive Conservative Premier of Ontario Mike Harris better protected landlords' rights with the TPA Act introduced in 1998:

Easier Evictions
Harris' Tenant "Protection"

http://www.ontariotenants.ca/articles/19...

I'm sure that got changed...

I learned a lot though this thread ☺

Kathryn - posted on 03/01/2013

260

0

94

Yes, Nova Scotia.
We actually have one of the better provinces to be a landlord in.
Ontario, in our opinion, is the absolute hardest. They are very pro-tenant.

They actually revised the tenancy act for us Nov 2012.We can now start evictions when a tenant is 15 days in rental arrears, without a hearing. That was a major breakthrough.A tenant can still delay it, but not nearly as long now.
At one point, it could take us 6-10 months to get them out. Now it is more like 2-3 months.

Yes, truckers do work for their money. That is for sure.

Northern - posted on 03/01/2013

731

0

38

Being a landlord is not the road to riches!

I can relate to your frustrations with the common misconceptions about landlords. I had to deal with a lot of misconceptions about truck driving. When my husband worked as a long haul truck driver, a lot of people assumed his job was easy - all you have to do is drive a truck. They didn;t know what it takes to be a successful truck driver, from the long hours on the road, lack of sleep, working the log books, truck repairs, driving through impossible conditions etc.

I think it's very important that your frustrations are heard. If the majority of Canadians and politicians are better educated on what a landlord puts up with to make a living, they will have better understanding, therefore more sympathy and respect for your line of work. Same applies to truck driving.

We need to make sure government regulations remain fair to businesses because small businesses such as yours are the lifeline of our national economy.

By the way, I just want to clarify my data here ... you're from Nova Scotia right ?

Kathryn - posted on 02/28/2013

260

0

94

ooops ..should be "aren't supporting the Bill"..thanks for seeing that.

To answer your question about if there are ways to collect from defaulting tenants, yes and no.All provinces in are different.

Yes...if we are able to find the tenant and legally serve them the paperwork. Many times this must be done in person or we can ask for 'substituted service' (whatever the tenancy board agrees is an alternate..including serving next of kin)
If the tenants has an employed income we can garnishee their wages..as long as they make a certain amount.

No....
We cannot touch pensions, EI,welfare benefits,child care benefits, tax returns etc.
The best we can do is have the sheriff check their bank account and seize whatever money happens to be there on that day. We need to be able to tell the sherrif where they work, and which bank they use (and these people change this info like their phone number...often)


Community Services know the tenants have a lease, because the landlords are required to fill out the 'blue form' for the tenant. They know they are skipping out on the landlord, because another landlord is also filling out this form.
Their hands are tied, but the government regulations permit it.

Welfare recipients can opt to pay their rent direct to the landlord (up to an allowable amount) but the tenant always has the right to stop payments at any time.

Some provinces do not even permit a landlord to collect a security/damage deposit. We are lucky..we get 1/2 month's rent.

We now require anyone without a employed income to have a co-signer. It protects us a little bit.

Anyone who thinks landlords are rich...would be surprised how many hours we put into this business...and the disgusting things we need to deal with.

And the many pets that are left behind. We have taken in or rehomed about 10-12 cats so far.They are the innocent victims.

Northern - posted on 02/28/2013

731

0

38

You raise some interesting points Kathryn.

First of all, I agree there is no housing shortage and tenants should be held accountable for their actions.

I was not fully aware of how difficult it is to be a landlord and make a good living. Aren't there ways for landlords to protect themselves from tenant defaults ?

I think its fair for landlords to be notified if the tenants have a history of defaults on previous landlords.

I got a bit confused by your last comment "Anyways, I'm glad they are supporting this Bill, and adding to the taxes." The Harper Government is not supporting the Bill and the carbon tax that the NDP want to introduce.

Kathryn - posted on 02/28/2013

260

0

94

There is no housing shortgage. What there is, is a shortgage of good tenants (as landlords we know this very well)

We need to make tenants accountable for their actions. Tenants may only recieve a certain amount for housing in their welfare payment. Many times people complain about the rent being so high.
Ask the landlord how much profit they make considering the high amount of tenant defaults (with no chance of recovery), tenant damage, (the cost of garbage removal is outrageous), property insurance, taxes,utilities and regular maintenace and repairs.

The time it takes to get control back of a property, and the ability to find a new tenant...and the process starts all over again. Social services will not tell landlords if they have a history of defaults on previous landlords.

Anyways, I'm glad they are supporting this Bill, and adding to the taxes.
The carbon tax is being scrapped in Australia, when the new government takes office in Sept, and hopefully other countries will follow suit.

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms