Anti-Irish

Brittany - posted on 11/07/2011 ( 33 moms have responded )

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Seeing as how I can not get on here a lot, and I truly love and respect each person opinion on here, I will post a few things I am wondering about. Hopefully, they will be thought provoking.

I am Catholic, as many know, and I love my Irish background. I love telling people about it, I love hearing my kids talk about and I am proud of it.

Recently I have noticed some Anti-Irish things being said or displayed.

Do you ladies think there is still an Anti-Irish movement in America or any other part of the world for that matter?

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[deleted account]

Not in the Western New York area where you have one of the highest concentrations of Irish Americans in the US (South Buffalo to be precise). I've never in my life witnessed anti-Irish sentiment except in political arenas and usually it was another ethnic group (the local Polish community) saying that an Irishman couldn't represent them. My first mother in law (also Polish) was very anti Irish but I think that was just because it was me. :-) she didn't like me.

[deleted account]

I agree with Marina that I haven't seen anything on here in particular that I would associate with being anti-Irish and I certainly haven't seen anything lately that I would associate with an increase in anti-Irish sentiments.

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[deleted account]

Love the saying Meggy and Laura i had lots of my friends American friends telling me to say "Lucky charms" alot while i was in Wisconsin were she lives.I gave it welly i did for the Crack.:-)The loved it..i guess saying it with a true Irish accent it sounded good.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 11/10/2011

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I believe there's enough pride in being Irish to outweigh any anti Irish sentiment. My email signature is an Irish saying that says: There are 2 kinds of people in this world. The Irish and everyone who wishes they were Irish.

Of course that's my personal email, not my professional one, but you get the idea.

Isobel - posted on 11/10/2011

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well...I have taught my children to say "fiddle dee dee potatoes" in an Irish accent whenever they bump into my friend James, but other than that...

Jenni - posted on 11/10/2011

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I'm not Irish... errr at least, I don't think I am. My grandmother's side is a hodge podge of Welsh and Scottish decent. The rest of my family is German/Danish.



I've personally never heard of negativity towards the Irish here in Ontario. I love Irish culture, myself. (This post keeps reminding me of Gangs of New York, love that movie). But I adore Irish Folk music. I absolutely love hearing the accent through the lyrics, heavenly. My FIL always plays it (he's English) it's the only music he listens to. I also use to hang out at an Irish pub as a teen. They'd have live Irish folk bands, eats, people, rugby/football, there's just such a warm, inviting atmosphere to the culture it felt so homey and the people were so welcoming.



I can't really comment on any negativity towards the culture. I just haven't experienced it in my neck of the woods. ;)

[deleted account]

Again with the "Luck of the Irish" its really does depend on how its said to you and how sensitive of a person you are as well.IMHO.Were very unlucky at the moment here recession wise lol.

I have not seen any anti-Irish comments on COM in my 2-3 yrs on here.

Jeannette - posted on 11/09/2011

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Being Scott/Irish/Cajun, I am not offended by most things that poke fun at any of them. My mother's entire family is from Louisiana, and there are loads of cajun jokes/slurs. I don't take much seriously though. My middle child and I are always laughing and one of the funniest topics is ourselves! (I know I left myself open here:)) I cannot say I've seen any anti-Irish posts or anything else either.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 11/09/2011

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LOL Exactly Jen! I'm from Western New York as well and the only anti ethnic stuff I can remember is my mom saying that my mama's older brothers wouldn't allow her to marry her boyfriend because he was Italian and they were Irish even though both parties were Catholic.

I was even told by a Russian Jewish woman that the Irish and the Jews have a lot in common because of what we went through. But I've never had any anti Irish sentiment and my first and last names were Irish until I was married.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 11/09/2011

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Huh, thanks for that insight Rebecca. I guess my experience is solely on my BIL's experience. I have never heard of it as an insult ever until he told me how it was over in Ireland....how horrible it was for him being raised Catholic.

[deleted account]

I don't know about needing to be located in Ireland to be insulted by the phrase Irish Catholic. I grew up in the US and have never been to Ireland. My mother's side of the family is Irish/Scottish and is Protestant. My father's side of the family is Catholic and German/Norwegian/Slovak. We were raised Catholic because my father's family insisted on it. My mother had to convert to Catholicism as part of marrying my dad. I attended a Catholic school for 12 years and we had many Irish Catholic families who attended the school. Growing up in the neighborhood and going to that school, I certainly heard the phrase "Irish Catholic" dished out as an insult on more than one ocassion with respect to families who had many kids (our neighborhood was mostly Polish and Catholic and it was typically someone who was Polish Catholic insulting the Irish Catholics for producing so many kids). The Irish Catholics used to insult the Polish Catholics for being slow or stupid. This all occurred in the US in the 1970s and 1980s.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 11/09/2011

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But, I think what everyone wants to know, what relevent recent things have you noticed as far as "Anti-Irish things being said or displayed"?? I truly have not seen anything, but if there is, please let us know.

No, I don't think there is an Anti Irish movement in America...at least not one specific place...but there is prejudice everywhere. Cannot pin point one particular spot though.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 11/09/2011

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Well, it all depends on your perspective as far as the Irish Catholic being insulting goes. If you are a protestant, then yes...you can be killed for being Catholic in Ireland...so yes, it can be an insult if you are IN Ireland. Like I said, my BIL is straight from Ireland, and he is a Catholic Irish. He does not hang his head in shame about it (except when he brings up all the molestation that goes on....ESPECIALLY where he is from). He has almost lost his life for being catholic on more than one occasion also. Dragged out of his car through the broken window they bashed in to get him out, and beat the living shit out of him. So, really....as far as being Irish Catholic goes, it all depends on what religion you are to be insulted by it.

Brittany - posted on 11/09/2011

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I have lived in different parts of the USA and my great-grandmother is from Ireland (She is in Heaven now).

I have been insulted. I have been degrated by people.

Rebecca, I like how you brought up the "Luck of the Irish". When I graduated form high school, in the top of my class and with a 3.8 average, one of the others graduates parents looked at my Daddy and said "Oh, so I see we have an Irish girl graduating this year?". My Daddy said "Yes, I am very proud of her." They said "WOW! I don't think we have ever had an Irish person graduate from here before." My Dad just shot them a look. The person responded "I suppose the luck of the Irish rubbed off on her....hope she goes to college."

I do not believe I have ever seen my Daddy so mad in my whole life. I thought he was going to rip that persons head clear off their shoulders.

I do not consider myself "Irish Catholic" simply becuase, it is mostly associated with a negative line. Not all Irish People are Catholic, as a matter of fact St. Patrick's Church in Dublin is not a Catholic Church.

Also, recently, I heard a woman tell her child not to talk to my son because, he is Irish. My son looks very Irish, he is pale with redish/blone hair and brown eyes. Perhaps she was trying to say not to talk to him because, he might be Catholic but, Irish is what came out of her mouth.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 11/08/2011

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I was just told not to sing 'The overalls in Mrs Murphy's chowder' too loud because of the term Mick.

[deleted account]

My family has actually been in this country since before the potato famine, so you won't find me complaining about Britain's response to it. ;-) I don't think it's an issue of walking around with a chip on my shoulder at all. I was merely suggesting things that Brittany might be reading as offensive since she hasn't provided any information about what she is talking about. There are quite a few things that are actually Irish insults that not everyone realizes are insults. Just like the phrase the "pot calling the kettle black" is taken by some African-Americans as a racial insult. I never would have taken it that way until a friend pointed it out. On thinking about it, I see her point and try not to use that phrase anymore.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 11/08/2011

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Rebecca, I'm 1/2 Irish, my maiden name is Donnelly, my maternal grandma's maiden name is Donahue. If you're going to take offense to every saying around, then you're going to walk around with a chip on your shoulder. I don't suppose you still hold a grudge against the British since it was because of them that so many Irish lost their homes during the blight and they were treated as dirt by the British for centuries.



I'm proudly 50% Irish and 50% First Nation which is another group of people who were badly treated by the government and are still badly treated. I don't get offended by the Kansas City Chiefs having someone ride around on a horse at Football games or by the Chicago Blackhawks' team logo.



ETA: The term Canuck is a derogoratory term for a Canadian. But, Vancouver turned it around and they have it as the team name for their hockey team.

[deleted account]

Patty wagon here refers to the police vans and it was nicknamed the "Patty wagon" because so many drunk "Patricks" (AKA Irishmen) were on it (hence the "Patty-wagon").

[deleted account]

Irish twins is funny, why would you describe your kids with that,and we still use paddy wagon for police van.What is patty wagon?
Also while i was in the US we were at a fast food place @ an Irish festival(brilliant) and the had some Irish food.
My accent was heard and i was asked what was a particular Irish dish, i had no clue and the couple laughed rudely& loud and said your meant to be Irish.Others looked at me.I was made a show of.
I said yes thats the point i am and i don't know that "Irish dish that is being served".As in it was not Irish.I found that rude.Other than that its been okay.

[deleted account]

I am of Irish descent and I find the phrase "luck of the Irish" offensive. If you know the history of the phrase, I don't see how you couldn't find it offensive. The whole concept behind the "luck of the Irish" was that Irish people were so incompetent and so incapable that, if anything positive happened to them, it was due to luck and not positive attributes such as skill, hard work, etc. So yes, I find that phrase offensive (even if it wasn't intended that way by the speaker). In fact, I usually point out to people the history if they say it because it is actually an insult. I was also raised Catholic and I can tell you that, on more than one occasion, I have heard people mutter, "Irish Catholic" when seeing a large Irish Catholic family (e.g., 8, 9, 10 kids). It is an insult directed at the impression that Irish people breed like rabbits. So again, when I hear that phrase, particularly in reference to the child-bearing status of Irish Catholics, I find it offensive.

Have I seen any comments like that on here? Not that I recall. I only offered them because Brittany did not provide any examples of what she is talking about.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 11/08/2011

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Rebecca, I'm of Irish decent and I've never been offended by the phrase luck of the Irish. Or the phrase Irish Catholic. And I do understand that there was and still is a lot of animosity between Irish Catholics and Irish Protestants. The fact that most Irish who imigrated to the US and Canada spoke Gaelic and were Catholic instead of Protestant was the reason that there was so much discrimination towards the Irish and that the NINA laws were passed.

There is still some discrimination towards Catholics in parts of the US because we pray to Saints along with the Holy Trinity. A friend of mine in Texas joked that Catholics believe God delegates and I told him 'Yes, He does'. But there were also people passing out pamphlets about how Catholics are Idolators which is a pretty old accusation because of the statues we have in our Churches.

Merry - posted on 11/08/2011

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Rebecca it's not offensive if the person isn't saying it in the tintent to be offensive and it also in st offensive if the Irish person doesn't feel insulted.
If its said rudely or derogatorily then it's offensive, but if someone innocently says a phrase not knowing its 'rude' it doesn't mean their Irish haters.

Merry - posted on 11/08/2011

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I haven't seen it! Everyone adores our daughters name Fierna and we tell everyone that it's an old Irish name!
I love my Irish heritage and I haven't come accords anyone hating Irish.

[deleted account]

Actually, there are a lot of phrases that people use in common speak that they don't really realize are actually insults to those of us who are of Irish decent. Luck of the Irish? Insult. Patty Wagon? Insult. Irish twins? Insult. Even the phrase "Irish Catholic" is often used in a derogatory manner. That being said, I don't think people who are't Irish even know the history or understand that those phrases are offensive. I don't think there is much of an anti-Irish movement, but it certainly wouldn't surprise me if there are individuals who harbor an anti-Irish mindset.

JuLeah - posted on 11/07/2011

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Well, I am not sure what you mean by anti-Irish. Do you have examples?

I have not heard or seen it, but I don't pay attention as I would to anti ... queer, Jew, woman, single mom ...If I had heard it, I would have spoken up as I am sure most here would ... but if we are not seeing something, let us know

Jodi - posted on 11/07/2011

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I don't see any issues in Australia, but I'd say half the population here is descended from the Irish anyway.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 11/07/2011

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I'm in Canada but originally from the US and part of a large Irish/German (German by way of Alsace Lorraine on my dad's mom's side) Catholic family. My maiden name is Donnelly and aside from spelling errors and a few pronounciation issues I haven't had any problems with anything Irish.



There were issues back in the mid 1800's during the potato famine which lead to a large imigration of Irish after being turned from their homes by their English landlords. There were signs up to the 1920's saying no dogs or Irish allowed and NINA laws NINA stands for No Irish Need Apply. But I never noticed anything.



I'm Irish and First Nation. I make joks about being Irish, but I've never noticed any new anti Irish movement.

Jocelyn - posted on 11/07/2011

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I've never noticed anyone being anti-Irish. Our area is BIG on the whole Gaelic/Highland culture (in southern Alberta, go figure lol). And you can't turn around without smacking into a pale Brit/Irishman/Scot!

Becky - posted on 11/07/2011

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It's not something I've ever noticed around here. Mind you, I'm not Irish - although I get asked if I am a lot because of my red hair! And I don't really know a lot of people who are Irish. Why would people be anti-Irish? I know there is some violence in their history, but there is violence in every country's history! Being anti-any nationality is dumb, IMO. Be against their politics, their belief system, their inhumane treatment of their people, whatever. But to be against all people of that nationality based on those things is very narrow-minded.

Denikka - posted on 11/07/2011

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I sure as hell hope not!!
I have always had a fondness for all things Irish. I would be very sad if there were any kind of anti-Irish movement.
That being said, I haven't seen anything to suggest that there is...sooo...hopefully it'll never happen.
(I'm tired of all the racist crap anyways XP a person is a person is a person!!)

~♥Little Miss - posted on 11/07/2011

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Could you elaborate on the anti Irish things being displayed???? Tv? Local stores?

Yes, many many MANY years ago, if you were Irish living on the east coast, it was difficult. Now we have huge Irish communities up in Boston. Infact, my BIL is straight from Ireland, and even has his family here occassionally.

No, I have not recently noticed anti Irish movements. He would definitely bring it to our attention.

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