Black boxes on all new cars

√v^√v^√♥ - posted on 12/04/2011 ( 8 moms have responded )

12,224

26

264

http://www.examiner.com/finance-examiner...


Beginning in June of 2011, all new cars manufactured and sold in the United States will be required to have a mandated black box device installed, which can be used to monitor several different physical and technical data points.

On May 24th, a report on the new regulatations to be implemented by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) next month expands the program that in February was just in a consideration phase.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is expected to issue new regulations next month, that will require a black box style data recorder be fitted in all new cars.

Similar in concept to the familiar black boxes used in commercial aircraft for decades, the boxes are expected to record information about speed, seat belt use and brake application in the final seconds leading up to an accident, the data can be retrieved for later analysis. – Dvice.com

The installation and use of these black boxes can have infinite possibilities for local, state, and federal governments to monitor and record data for a number of other revenue programs that are currently under consideration. In March, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) issued a proposal to institute a tax on mileage to help pay for the federal budget deficit. Additionally, local cities and counties can download information from these black boxes, and they can be used to issue driving citations after the fact in the case of speeding or not wearing a seat belt.

While the concept of installing a black box in new automobiles has several good points in assisting law enforcement and emergency services as to the location and circumstances of an accident or road emergency, policies currently underway by many municipalities and states show that public safety personnel are now being used more as revenue collectors than as first responders to incidents as they occur.

In addition, current mobile devices outside the automobile black box such as androids and tom-toms are being used by law enforcement to retrieve data on customer travel.

That’s a theoretical problem, a real problem is the fact that the data is being used to setup police revenue sources such as speed cameras. A Dutch firm has openly admitted that they use TomTom customer data to setup speed traps. So this anonymized data is actually being used to cost you money for something that isn’t actually dangerous as currently implemented (in other words speed limits aren’t actually a safety limit but an arbitrarily selected number). – blog.christopherburg.com

Selling the public on safety for new policies and provisions, while using the programs to create new revenue streams is becoming more the norm than simply isolated incidents. When the tax on cigarettes became enlarged under the guise of helping users stop the addiction, expanding the tax soon turned into the first concession by local legislatures when they needed new money for programs. Add to this, the creation of red-light and speed devices on local streets and highways to monitor safety quickly became massive revenue streams for municipalities.

With mandatory black boxes being installed in all new cars sold in the US starting next month, the public needs to be aware of the potential these devices can have as means to collect revenue for states and the federal government outside the reported use by the NHTSA as a safety device.

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Sherri - posted on 12/05/2011

9,593

15

391

I am 100% fine with it. If you aren't doing anything wrong why care. Also if you are speeding then damn straight you should be caught by a speed trap and given a ticket.

If you aren't doing anything wrong then you won't be supporting any states revenue. Plus I love that it can help with information with accidents.

Stifler's - posted on 12/05/2011

15,141

154

604

You shouldn't be speeding anyway. It's not like there is information of a personal nature on the black box.

8 Comments

View replies by

Stifler's - posted on 12/05/2011

15,141

154

604

They have cameras here to see whether the same truck from Cairns is in Brisbane without stopping and there fore has fudged their log books.

Sherri - posted on 12/05/2011

9,593

15

391

No that is not what they are saying at all Krista. They are saying they use the data to know where to place police officers in high speeding areas to catch or really slow down or deter a high number of speeders.

Krista - posted on 12/05/2011

12,562

16

847

How would the logistics of it work, though? I don't speed, but if I'm passing someone on the highway, then yes, sometimes i have to go over the speed limit a bit. Would I get an automatic ticket for that? That just seems silly, when an actual cop would never dream of giving someone a ticket for passing while going 5 or 10 km/h over the limit.

I'd have to hear more about precisely how they plan on using this information, before making a judgment.

Amanda - posted on 12/05/2011

2,559

3

366

No I dont think so Niki. You give your government way to much credit. The cost to pay people to monitor these boxes, would be insane, and not worth the cost of a speeding ticket.

√v^√v^√♥ - posted on 12/04/2011

12,224

26

264

So you don't think they'll ever take the next step after this in some year or decade in the future to track everyone's speed and then send tickets in the mail if your car automatically goes over the speed limit? Yeah right.......

Amanda - posted on 12/04/2011

2,559

3

366

Before anyone panics about privacy issues.

"The EDR is known commonly as a black box and has been installed in some vehicles since 1996. About 60 million vehicles now have them and 85 percent of new cars this year will come standard with a "black box," according to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates.


All it takes is a special software to collect speed, engine rpm, brake and throttle data from your car's so-called black box.The agency does not mandate that manufacturers install these data recorders. But NHTSA is requiring that cars with EDRs store at least 15 kinds of data and have the information easily accessible by Sept. 1, 2012. Automakers, including BMW, Ford, Mercedes-Benz and Toyota, want to delay that for a year."

"With the name 'black box,' everyone thinks it's some sort of Big Brother technology," said Bill Rose, product manager at Bosch Diagnostics, creator of the Crash Data Retrieval System software. "But, really, it's information that originally was stored in the airbag modules so that airbag companies and manufacturers could develop the product."

So if your car has air bags you already store this information, and you just might already have a black box installed on your car also. Check your user manual to find out.

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms