BSA (Boy Scouts of America) anti gay???? would you let your kid join? input

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/20/2012 ( 77 moms have responded )

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So, my son is a pretty shy kid, until he is really comfortable in his surroundings. He does not like to do new activities, is very smart, but timid. He is afraid to look silly in front of other people. For the past year, I have been talking to him about boy scouts, and how much he would learn, meet new friends, have his own little buddies outside of school. I don't know what I said right the other day, cause now he is wicked excited to get started! I was planning on enrolling him soon. But I just learned that BSA is anti gay? I am so upset, and distraught because this would seriously be the perfect environment as far as activities, friendship and experience goes. I am so thrilled that he wants to join, then I find this out. I am as pro gay/lesbian/transgender/transsexual as it gets, but I just don't know what to do. To know my son, and have him excited about something new is a HUGE rarity. I feel like I am either going to fully disappoint my son to the point where he will not try new things (which would be very like him) or I am going to support a group that doesn't support gays/lesbians. What would you do? I really feel like I will let my son down.



ETA, my son is 6

Also even scouts are speaking out against the ban

http://abcnews.go.com/US/boy-scouts-reaf...

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Kristi - posted on 07/25/2012

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Stella--The BSA is about more than their views on homosexuals. The are also against adultery, murder, and stealing."



Please tell me you are not comparing being gay to adulterors, murderers, and thieves. Being gay is not a crime. Oh, I so hope you don't mean this like it sounds.



Sapphire--"I also call BULLSHIT on the premise of "love the sinner, hate the sin". Define said sin?"



I was talking about the people who believe it is a sin to be gay because of what the Bible says and that the church I used to go to followed that saying. Just meaning that even though they believe that, they are not judging because they do accept people as they are. I don't believe being gay is a sin. And even though BSA has a lot to offer kids in other ways, I would not allow my child to be a part of an organization that discriminates against any group of people. I didn't mean to be offensive.



Elfrieda--"Yes, you knew that one kid, but I really don't think that's normal, and was probably more pressured onto him by the others."



Johnny's friend is not the only one or even of the few. Kids are horribly cruel. Some think they are entitled to bully people who are not the same as they are or they may just pick you out whether you are gay or not and "decide" you are, again "entitling" them to be little assholes. Aside from that, being gay is something everybody should be "concerned" about because LGBT's deserve the same human rights as everybody else and discrimination is not acceptable behavior.

Johnny - posted on 07/23/2012

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Just something to ponder. Because growing up I had a male friend, from kindergarten onward, who was targeted from the earliest I can remember for being gay. He was teased and ostracized for it, and it was pretty obvious. I seriously doubt that the Boy Scouts would have allowed him to learn to build a campfire along with their "not so obviously sexually oriented" sons. He wasn't talking about being gay at age 8, every other kid was talking about it for him. And the shit was clearly coming from the parents.

So to me, while it's sexual orientation isn't something that I think really needs to be discussed by the Scouts (it's completely inconsequential IMO), choosing to not allow any child who wants to join just automatically makes it an organization that I wouldn't send my kid to. I don't care if it is sexual orientation prejudice, racial prejudice etc. I am not a Catholic and don't support the Catholic church at all, but I also wouldn't send my kid to a group that discriminated against Catholics. I just don't like prejudice and don't ever want my kid to think that I do.

The Boy Scouts are completely free to practice any form of discrimination they chooose. I just find it rather disheartening that so many people obviously support that. To me choosing to participate is a method of condoning it.

Mary - posted on 07/21/2012

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Tracey, the only problem with that mentality is that for a fair number of boys, scouts can be something that they are in for years. I knew more than a few guys who were still actively involved in it through college. Those teen years are an especially crucial time for children to start to explore and understand these more complex issues, and develop the foundation of their own beliefs on these issues. It is also a time when the parental influence starts to wane, and kids start to place much more emphasis on the thoughts and ideas of their peers.



I'd be just as torn as Little Miss on this; if she lets him join now, despite the organization's firm statements about religion and homophobia, what does she do if he is still really into it at 12 or 13, and he's made really good friends with that kid who had raised to believe things that she finds morally repugnant, and whose parents are discussing their anti-gay beliefs at the dinner table? Those are some tricky waters to navigate.



Can that scenario happen in any activity? Of course. However, the odds of that playing out are much greater when you join an organization that you already know is supportive of that viewpoint.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/21/2012

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It is about having him and our family being associated with a group that does not uphold equality as a whole. It is not about our children understanding adult ignorance. We already discuss tolerance in our household.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 08/11/2012

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Since many of you are not on my facebook, I will post this here also. I just got off the phone with the pack leader. You will all be interested to know, they need sponsors from organizations around town. The sponsor for this pack is a female lesbian pastor :)

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~♥Little Miss - posted on 08/13/2012

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I am not really certain it matters either way Karla and Kristi. Like I said, this is a very affluent community, money is not an issue.

Bobbie - posted on 08/13/2012

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I say shut it down. Too many worms crawling out of this simple question. You have had your answer in spades.

Bobbie - posted on 08/13/2012

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Hi,
I say this is a perfect opportunity for you to make a difference as well as have your son enjoy activities. I do hope that the word gay isn't coming up in the pack meetings at age 6. I mean, sexual choice isn't on the table that young these days is it?
If they are not pro gay then only from inside of the scouts as a scout parent can you have voice as to your stance. The public at large without investment in the BSA have little pull and no voice to make changes.
As for your son, I can put it to you this way. Schools both public and private have a ban against openly gay and proud teachers announcing their sexual preference. I feel we need to protect our young children from certain topics, since they aren't age appropriate. Let him enjoy the fun without the adult burden of total inclusion issues, until you have the chance to sway the tide :)

Karla - posted on 08/12/2012

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Lil Miss and Kristi,

I was wondering something similar, what are the goals of the lesbian pastor?

Does she think BSA is a great organizations to sponsor?

Or is it more of a civil liberties thing and she's making a point, pushing the envelope in the name of equality?

One thing is for sure, money talks. ;-)

Kristi - posted on 08/11/2012

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That is interesting, Little Miss. So, as the devil's advocate (not literally, duh), I wonder if they are breaking "the rules" out of tolerance or because they need money? Just my little fuel/fire. Lol ; )

[deleted account]

I had the same issue with BSA. I refused to teach my son that bigotry of any kind is Ok. We put him in Campfire instead. They are open and welcoming to all.

Julie - posted on 08/09/2012

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My Husband is proud to be an Eagle Scout. YES, if my either of my boys expressed interest in joining, I would let them.

Chaya - posted on 08/01/2012

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Yes, they are anti gay, wether or not you send him depends on whatever works for you. There are other options. There is an organization that accepts both boys and girls, (Camp Fire?) And there are others. Camp fire is just as much scouting as BSA is

Annabelle - posted on 08/01/2012

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I am pro-tolerance and pro-acceptance for others and that's what I promote to my children. My son, age 9, has been in boy scouts over a year and he LOVES it!!! At some point we end up "supporting" something we aren't in agreement with because that's just the only option we have (if wal-mart suddenly went anti-gay we'd still shop there cause it's wal-mart and we have to typically). I say pick your battles, if your son is excited let him go for it!! If it ever comes up have a chat with him about tolerance and acceptance....and mom, shame on you for not doing your homework first :) LOL Odd are you'll never find any organization that supports all the things you do.

Adrienne - posted on 07/31/2012

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First of all, I think that every organization has a right to set rules and guidlines as they see fit. I would not, however allow my child to join the Boy Scouts as I do not agree with the stance they take on gays.

Karla - posted on 07/29/2012

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Isobel,

The one point the BSA have is they are not federally funded. Other then that, I don't know. It's not like a restaurant can refuse to serve certain people. (The only exception being "No Shoes, No Shirt, No Service." It's a health code thing.) They probably do operate under the "separation of church and state" umbrella.

For instance Dan Cathy CEO of Chick-fil-a can put his contributions toward anti-gay groups, but he cannot refuse service to gay patrons; though I doubt he has any gay patrons anymore.

Isobel - posted on 07/29/2012

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But they are in the States too, which is why I don't understand why it's legal in the states to discriminate against people for being gay...oh right, it's a church thing, I forgot. Never mind.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/29/2012

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******MOD WARNING******

This is the last warning I will give, then this thread gets locked down. I have already had to delete one post. Please get back on topic!!

~DM MoD Little Miss~

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/29/2012

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*****MoD Warning*****

Ok ladies, you are making me wear my mod hat. Please return to the op as a discussion, and if you would like to start a new thread on how Canada's Laws are created or whatever, go for it! Get back on topic!

~DM MoD Little Miss~

MeMe - posted on 07/29/2012

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LOL, sorry Isobel but you are not completely correct. The Federal gov has more pull than you think. They have a part in creating Provincial provisions. It's called "Money" and if a Province wants funding, they must add certain stipulations that the Federal Gov has voiced OR they do not get the funding.

For instance. All provinces MUST supply child care and they must ALL have a form of subsidy. How they regulate and take it from there, is on them. However, if they want any support from the Federal Gov, they may have to conform certain ideas and/or wants, to satisfy the Federal Gov.

Oh, how it is great to know, you are also not the only one to have taken law classes. ;)

Anyhow, I don't care too much. I will continue to state what I know and you can continue to try and falsify it. This has gotten this thread way off topic, so I will bow out, of yours and my, rant.

Isobel - posted on 07/29/2012

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You are the one who keeps claiming to know EVERYTHING about Canada...I just have to correct you about the few things I happen to KNOW are wrong...as I've said before, just talk about your space in the world and the problem won't arise.

Isobel - posted on 07/29/2012

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not everybody, just you ;) and you were doing SO well before that last comment. no, our laws do NOT start at federal. Every province is free to create any legislation they like (so long as it's within the provincial powers) but where they come in conflict with federal laws, the federal laws win out (kinda like most countries), except in Quebec where they have the Notwithstanding Clause which allows their provincial laws to supercede federal.



Our Federal government reigns over Criminal law, taxation, banks/money, international commerce, copyrights, etc. The provinces reign over contracts and torts, direct taxation for provincial purposes, corporations, the creation of municipalities and matters of a local or private nature within any province.(and they said I'd never open that text book again).



Not everything is federal, and I never claim to know everything about Canada, but taking two Canadian law classes in the last three years at least qualifies me to yell BULLSHIT when I hear it.

MeMe - posted on 07/29/2012

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Proud Isobel? Nah, just letting you know you aren't the only Canadian that knows anything about their Country. I still stand behind every other thing I have ever said.



Like I said before. Our laws start in the Federal Jurisdiction and from there the Provinces can make them tougher or not but they still have to enforce them at some level. I like the way you tend to think you have this wealth of knowledge that no one else has. I work for the Government and so does my husband. Perhaps you need to do some reading on how it actually works. ;)



You see, our Federal laws are often left open for interpretation. Which allows each Province to interpret as they decide and form their regulation using the basis of the Federal law. I.E A law is not the same as a regulation. Federal Gov has laws, Provincial Gov has regulations. ;)

Isobel - posted on 07/28/2012

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for once that DOES sound like a federal issue...I see why you are so proud of yourself for finally getting it right ;P

MeMe - posted on 07/28/2012

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Here is some info for Canada:

Scouts Canada, however, welcomes any members “regardless of gender, race, culture, religious belief, sexual orientation or economic circumstance.”

http://o.canada.com/2012/07/17/boy-scout...

Scouts Canada, a separate organization from the U.S. Boy Scouts, does not discriminate for reasons of gender, culture, religious belief or sexual orientation.

http://www.thespec.com/news/world/articl...

MeMe - posted on 07/28/2012

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Isobel, in Canada (yes, I said Canada), they are NOT allowed to discriminate against anybody. This includes gay individuals. They would be in some big shit, if they turned a gay, black, white, disabled and so on, child away (or adult for leadership).

Isobel - posted on 07/28/2012

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I would remove my son from the organization. And as for hate the sin not the sinner...I prefer to hate the beliefs, not the believer.

I'm currently looking for BSC's stance on the topic and will make my decision when I find out.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/28/2012

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There are so many wonderful things the BSA does for children. It is really unfortunate that they are continuing their stance against homosexuallity. In Ma, may boys that are about to receive their eagle scout badges are turning them in due to all this controversy. They are taking a stand. I love that. I am still very torn whether or not I am going to let my son do this. Every day he asks me about joining. We are not in the area yet where I would want him to join, but hopefully will be before the start of the school year. Next week I am panning on calling up the chapter leader for that area, and finding out their stance on the issue. I will have to make my decision then in regards to the response I receive.

Kristi - posted on 07/27/2012

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Stella--



I didn't want it to sound any way, that is how it sounds to me, that is why I asked because I had a hard time believing that somebody would mean it that way. People are saying some wild stuff on both sides of the fence.This was also pre-chicken so I was unware of your family experience, for lack of a better word. Had I known that, I wouldn't have asked. I sincerely was not trying to offend you. I'm sorry.



editted because I can not type anymore

Lakota - posted on 07/27/2012

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"Stella--The BSA is about more than their views on homosexuals. The are also against adultery, murder, and stealing."

Please tell me you are not comparing being gay to adulterors, murderers, and thieves. Being gay is not a crime. Oh, I so hope you don't mean this like it sounds."

Kristi, give me a break. Of course I didn't mean that. It sounded like that to you because that is how you wanted it to.

Karla - posted on 07/26/2012

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"I don't think that's normal these days, isn't there a huge anti-bullying campaign going on right now?

Off topic, but...
There's a reason there is a huge campaign against bullying, it's because bullying is still a huge problem. Kids are immature, they take what they see at home, in the neighborhood, on tv and now the internet, and they often misinterpret some of it and they test it and end up bullying someone. Some areas are worse then others. Many inner city areas have a lot of pressure to be a certain way, and be part of certain groups, and anyone who crosses them pays for it. - Especially Middle School age kids.

You must know kids always try to hide this kind of behavior from adults? You aren't going to see a lot of bullying if you aren't around kids on a daily basis.

Johnny - posted on 07/26/2012

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Being bullied didn't make him gay.. Nor rather effeminate. He was always like that and the bullying did not start until grade 3 or 4. Does that mean he should not have been allowed in. Boy Scouts? He actually was a Beaver. And a Cub for a year after.. I asked him about it the other day and apparently he liked it. Luckily Scouts Canada wasn't so discriminatory.

Elfrieda - posted on 07/26/2012

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Yes, that's what I'm saying, he was bullied and therefore was never able to act like a regular kid. Like if he wasn't good at catching a ball or whatever, and then was constantly teased about it, he'd shy away from any physical games, giving a bigger "reason" for more bullies to target him, etc. Whereas if he hadn't gotten teased, maybe he never would have enjoyed baseball but it wouldn't have become this huge issue.

I don't think that's normal these days, isn't there a huge anti-bullying campaign going on right now? People seem kinder than they used to be.

Bobmusicgirl4 - posted on 07/25/2012

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If the organization's beliefs do not match your own, then no I wouldn't send my child there. That is my personal opinion.

Karla - posted on 07/23/2012

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Johnny, ” Would those of you who would send your kids to the Boys Scouts despite their discrimination against gay men still send them if they discriminated against other groups? Say non-Caucasians? Or non-Christians?”



I understand your point and it is valid. I would like to clarify that the Boy Scouts don’t allow openly gay Troup Leaders. I do not think they turn away gay members.



Oh, never mind… I just read this:

http://www.scouting.org/Media/PressRelea...



Which says this:

The BSA policy is: “While the BSA does not proactively inquire about the sexual orientation of employees, volunteers, or members, we do not grant membership to individuals who are open or avowed homosexuals or who engage in behavior that would become a distraction to the mission of the BSA.”



I would think membership would include the scouts themselves.

Cub Scouts 7-11 y.o.

Boy Scouts 11- 18 y.o.

Venturing 14 – 21 y.o.



So there would certainly be members who would understand their sexual orientation.



To answer your question, no I would not.

And had I been fully aware of the BS Membership Policy some 5 years ago when my son went to Cub Scouts, I doubt I would have pursued it. I'm glad he didn't want to stay in it with Boy Scouts.

(go 4-H!) ;-)

Elfrieda - posted on 07/23/2012

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@ Johnny, since you want a specific answer to your question, although you're not the OP, no I wouldn't send my son to a group where whites only were welcome. But little kids know if they're white or not from a very early age (well, I didn't realize I was until age 11 or so, I thought "white" meant "the people who have lived here for a long time and who run things and only speak English and are kind of scary" besides I was kind of pink anyway), whereas sexuality is not something kids need to worry about. Yes, you knew that one kid, but I really don't think that's normal, and was probably more pressured onto him by the others.

MeMe - posted on 07/23/2012

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You do make good points, Johnny. I suppose, not all feel it is that they are condoning it, rather putting their beliefs aside, so their children can benefit. However, I do think it is very wrong that the Boy Scouts do such things. I truly do not understand why there needs to be a diversion at all. They are just kids, who cares which way they will swing, later in life. It is not a disease, it is not a preference. I have several gay friends and they are some wonderful folk. So, really I don't get it, at all.

Truthfully, I am unsure if I would send my child or not. I suppose, for me, it all depends if there were other similar activities in the area of which I lived. My main intent, is and would be, to promote certain development within my child. If this was the only thing in my area, I would seriously consider placing them. Simply because it is my personal issue, not the child's. They just want to be a part of a group and sometimes, it is all there is.

MeMe - posted on 07/23/2012

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Johnny---Would those of you who would send your kids to the Boys Scouts despite their discrimination against gay men still send them if they discriminated against other groups? Say non-Caucasians? Or non-Christians?

If they discriminated against non-Caucasians? Probably not. I like my kids getting that diversity.

If it were to discriminate against non-Christians? Probably not but I would prefer it the other way around. ;)

Though it is not the same as my young child not knowing they are not with any gay children. Children should not need to worry about sexual orientation and well, from my experience, they don't. As they get older, I think it is up to them to make their decisions on that type of topic. They would notice if it was an all white camp or a completely gospel one.

I don't know, for me, it is about the child. So, if it is going to affect my child, then I would reconsider. If it is a political issue, that I am not comfortable with but it could in turn provide a variety of wonderful activity and development for my child, I would consider bypassing my own personal beliefs.

However, it is a wee difficult for me to know for sure, since we don't have this anti-gay issue, here. I can say, though, I would never ever send my kids to a church for Sunday school. ;)

Johnny - posted on 07/23/2012

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LOL. If that's what you think makes your country great. I just don't know what to say. But okay.

Still doesn't really answer my question though? I'm just wondering if people would enroll their kids in one of those groups just as willingly? Interesting that no one seems to really want to answer that though.

Lakota - posted on 07/23/2012

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There are groups out there that are "whites only", "blacks only", "christians only", "atheists only", "high iqs" only, "stupid people only", etc. It's part of what makes our country great. You can start whatever group you like. If you don't like what that groups stand for, stay away.

Johnny - posted on 07/23/2012

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You didn't answer my question at all Elfrieda. Would you send your son to a group that was openly "whites only" for the same purposes?

Elfrieda - posted on 07/23/2012

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I guess I just don't see the big deal when it's something that a little boy will be part of for a few years to go camping with some other kids and learn to start a fire and whatnot. I would be against my son going on and on as he gets older, just because I'm a bit of a non-joiner and I find that whole "you're in for life!" aspect slightly creepy. Surely as he grows he'll get other interests, possibly a job, and not have time for boy scouts anymore.

If it's strongly against your beliefs, then just explain it to your son and have done with it. Believing something strongly means making sacrifices.

When I was a kid, I quite often was invited by other kids to attend this once-a-week club thing put on by a church in the area. My parents were not overly thrilled about it, they're pacifists and for some reason this group had a strong military flavour (marching, chanting, hero-worship of men in uniform, a special uniform for us to wear), but they didn't forbid it. I went because I was invited by a friend and we made crafts and whatnot, and as I got older I stopped because it was all a little too weird for me and I felt like I was too old for that sort of thing. I'm just saying you don't need to be 100% supportive of every aspect of every group your child participates in.

Johnny - posted on 07/23/2012

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Would those of you who would send your kids to the Boys Scouts despite their discrimination against gay men still send them if they discriminated against other groups? Say non-Caucasians? Or non-Christians?

Lakota - posted on 07/23/2012

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I would let him go. He can still have a lot of fun and experience so much. By letting him go, you are supporting your son.

The BSA is about more than their views on homosexuals. The are also against adultery, murder, and stealing.

[deleted account]

Quoting Kristi C. "Sapphire-- Not ALL Christians are bigots"

Yes, you are correct. But please do go back and reread what I wrote: I live in a heavily populated Christian area, which happens to be quite bigoted. Guess where?! ARIZONA! Our mega-Christian centers here serve in the neighborhood of 2500+ members. We are an outsider of the faith, and therefore viewed differently.

The few Boy Sout troops do meet in the local church meeting rooms, while the Girls scouts meet at the local elementary schools. Why the difference? I do know for a fact that the local Boy scout meetings incorporate some type of blessings into their meetings. I don't see a purpose for a prayer or blessing when learning basic first-aid techniques, creating emergency shelters, or honoring the basic tenants of citzenship, kindness, and character. IMO- church is the appropriate forum for such worship and prayer-NOT at a Boy Scouts meeting. I would never support an institution that would blatently discriminate against another human being. I also call BULLSHIT on the premise of "love the sinner, hate the sin". Define said sin? Loving and committing oneself to someone of the same gender? That, in itself, is bigotry and hate, as well as simple homophobia. THAT is why I could never support the Boy Scouts.

Rosie - posted on 07/21/2012

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nope, wouldn't do it. i found this out a few years ago, and thank god i hadn't already put one of my 3 boys in boy scouts already. i won't join my kid into a club that is religious in nature, or promotes homophobia. aint' no fucking way.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/21/2012

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It is clearly more than just about that, but I am providing simple explanation.

Tracey - posted on 07/21/2012

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If your son is 6 does he need to know about groups being pro / anti gay rights?
Let him join and have his fun now and worry about the politics when he is old enough to understand and have his own opinions.

Karla - posted on 07/21/2012

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Meme, 4-H does have a lot of agriculture, and I live in a rural area so there are a lot of big and small animal projects. My daughters did poultry and rabbits; my son wants nothing to do with animals. One 4-H leader lets the inner city kids use her animals and keep them at her farm so that they can learn about and enter animal exhibits.

My experience with 4-H from my youth was all about still exhibits. My kids have done a lot of still exhibits as well. I imagine one could go on-line and get an idea of the kinds of projects kids can enter. Mine have done arts: oils, acrylic, charcoal, pencil, photography; crafts: leather craft, flower arrangement, plaster craft, rubber stamping, jewelry making, sewing, needle craft; Science: notebooks or trees and wildflowers, dioramas, models, rocketry, notebooks and posters on rabbits & poultry, woodworking; and then there's the baking, candy making, etc. O_o (It looks like so much when I make a list! - This is through the years, not all in one year.)

MeMe---(Past And Present) - posted on 07/21/2012

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4-H is a lot of fun. My Aunt, who is 5 years younger than me, was in it, here in Canada. I am not sure if it is different here, than in the US but here, it is more of a farming type of course. Such as they do a lot with animals, cooking, building things and so forth. She absolutely loved it and did it for many years.

Karla - posted on 07/21/2012

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Lil Miss, It sounds like you have a good plan for finding out how the Boy Scout troops in your area feel about that issue.

My son was in Cub scouts for a year. He liked the Cub Scouts, but did not want to continue into Boy Scouts and by then I did not try to sway his decision. Cub Scouts did a lot of activities, building, arts, crafts, etc., and the Boy Scouts are much more into camping. They told us they camp about once a month.

As Johnny mentioned, I remember signing a form that said we believed in God. I defined myself as agnostic at the time, so whatever.

Our troop leaders never mentioned Religion or Sexual Orientation. I thought for a young boys group it was okay. My son did not get along with the other boys that well; I thought many of them were hyper, and my son is very mild and he found their behavior annoying. The Scout Masters seemed to be used to the hyperactivity, actually one of them was father to the most obnoxious boy, and so I guess he would be used to the behavior.

I was a little uncomfortable with the need to sign a form to verify belief in God, and when I learned about their stance on homosexuals I was uncomfortable with that as well. I talked to my son about the belief system, but not the views on homosexuality. It definitely factored into my agreement that he not go on to Boy Scouts. (BTW my hubby really didn't like the group at all, he felt the Scout Masters weren't knowledgeable enough, and he felt The Cub/Boy Scouts were indoctrinating the boys into a military-like group.)

For the religious activities we would meditate – The Boy Scouts were fairly open about differing belief systems, so I tweaked their program to fit our lifestyle.

I have mentioned before that my kids are in 4-H. My son has done art work, wood working, and rocketry, through the 4-H program. It’s more low-key then the Cub Scouts were and very inclusive. It’s a non-profit run through the State Extension office so they have to include everyone. My son did 3 years of PeeWee 4-H (kind of a pre-4-H thing) and he’s in his 6th year of regular 4-H.

Good luck and let us know what you find out!

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/21/2012

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Elizabeth,



Of course there are going to be people with different opinions that I don't agree with. That isn't the point in its entirety. It is one thing to have a different opinion, and a whole other thing to join a program that are full of bigots. If I call the local chapter, and they do not support how BSA is handling gay/lesbian/bi rights, then it will be the place for my son. If they support the BSA and fully back their stance on "no gays allowed" I am not certain I want my child to participate in such a group. Like I said, I live in a state very supportive of these rights, and I am hoping the people who run these chapters are standing up to the BSA, or at least ignoring their ignorance.

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