Catch-Neuter-Release

Jenn - posted on 01/13/2011 ( 33 moms have responded )

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I watched something on Doc Zone last week about the massive feral cat problem and how they are trying to come up with a better solution to help control the population. If a feral cat was caught in the past it would likely end up at the SPCA and eventually be euthanized. Now they are trying to successfully incorporate a catch-neuter-release program. This way the animals are not harmed, but they are now unable to continue reproducing and adding to the growing problem (there are an estimated 100 million in North America). What do you think of this? Is this the best way to handle the problem? Should they just leave the cats alone? Should they continue to euthanize them? Thoughts?


http://www.cbc.ca/documentaries/doczone/...

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Jenn - posted on 01/13/2011

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@Jodi A. - it's the exact same problem here (at least 100 million sounds like a problem to me!) - the feral cats kill wildlife and destroy the natural ecosystem, which is why they are trying to push harder to incorporate this method of control. It's pretty hard to rally support for killing animals of any kind, even if they are a nuisance. And to turn your question around - why is another animal's life more important than the cat's life? I don't think it's about one being more important than the other, but rather the preservation of life in general, but under control at the same time.

Jodi - posted on 01/13/2011

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Oh, I agree Marina, I think it is incredibly selfish to abandon ANY animals, and it disgust me. In Australia, you have to have every dog and cat registered, and it costs more to register your animals if they are not neutered, so it is a step in the right direction. It annoys me when people with pet cats also let their cats roam around whenever they choose, because they are also a danger to local native wildlife. There is an area near here where residents are actually BANNED from having cats for this very reason.



If everyone were a responsible pet owner this wouldn't even be an issue, but many aren't, unfortunately.

Jodi - posted on 01/13/2011

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I actually support euthanising feral cats, providing it is done humanely. You may ask why? Because feral cats (particularly here in Australia) cause a lot of problems with the native wildlife. Neutering them and releasing them will not reduce that problem, whereas euthanising them will. There are areas here where native wildlife has become scarce because of feral cats. Preserving the native wildlife is important to the ecology of the Australian bush, so therefore much more important than preserving the life of the feral cats IMO.

Mary - posted on 01/13/2011

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I completely support this program - an adult feral cat has almost zero shot at being adopted (and kept) in a home. This program aims to help keep the population under control, while allowing these animals to live out their natural life span.

Kaleigh, I can't speak for your local shelter, but I do volunteer at my local Humane Society. The adoption fees for our animals don't cover even a fraction of what it costs to care for these animals while they are in the shelter. Trust me, my shelter barely gets by - without fundraisers and donations, it would have been closed long ago. The adoption fee for a dog is $125.00. This gives you an animal that has been altered, is up to date on all shots, and has been fully examined and cleared by our vet. This is LESS than what I spend individually for each of my dog's yearly check-ups and vaccinations - and there is no surgical procedure involved with those!

I don't think that places like your local SPCA are trying to make it difficult to adopt a shelter animal just for the sake of being difficult. Many shelters, including my own, have become more stringent in their screening processes in order to prevent an animal from being adopted and then returned for reasons that having nothing to do with the animal. One of the most common reasons an animal is surrendered to a shelter is the owner's inability to afford all that pet ownership entails...chances are, if you cannot afford that initial adoption fee, you will be hard pressed to provide the yearly costs involved in adequately feeding and caring for that animal.

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Claire - posted on 08/31/2012

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I absolutely agree with the catch, neuter, release. Keeps them alive without allowing them to breed like rodents!!

Jodi - posted on 08/29/2012

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And in the meantime, killing the native wildlife that is close to extinction. They don't have time, there is nothing humane about wiping out a species from the wild. I will agree to disagree on this one. My position will never change. Maybe if you lived in Australia where so many species of mammals are in danger of being wiped out purely because of feral cats, you might see it differently. But the debate will get closed anyway, because this debate is ancient.

Jen - posted on 08/29/2012

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You have to look at it through a non-biased perspective.

Though it is a growing issue, TNR sounds an effective solution, though it's

not an immediate one. It does adress the problem, but results

won't begin to show for several months to a few years.



TNR (trap neuter and release) will cut the growing population

within time, still allowing the feral cats in current day to

live out the remainder of their lives.



It is a humane solution.

Sharon - posted on 01/13/2011

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my cats are spayed and neutered. My dogs are spayed & neutered except three that react badly to anesthetic.

My cats are indoors only. If your cat is an outdoor cat, even part time, its life span is much shorter and more likely going to end violently. the friendlier your cat is, the more likely some freak will get their hands on it. same for dogs.

I've worked in animal rescue for years and I've got stories that will make you vomit to read them.

I have no issues with CSNR. Its next to impossible to catch a feral cat without a special trap.

But this thread makes me want to vomit.

Jodi - posted on 01/13/2011

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"why is another animal's life more important than the cat's life?"

One further thought....because one cat will kill many native animals. So why is one cat's life worth more than the MANY native animals that one cat will kill in its lifetime?

Jodi - posted on 01/13/2011

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That's right - I don't agree with what we did, and look at what Western society has done to the environment :P

I do believe the natural wildlife has more right to the environment than cats, and it can't be replaced. So euthanasia (humanely) to feral cats. Sorry. Nothing anyone says will sway me on that one. I have seen too much of the destruction that feral animals can do to an environment.

Jenn - posted on 01/13/2011

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"Because it isn't the cat's natural environment......it's akin to taking over land rights by killing off the natives, totally wrong and inappropriate. The natives should have more rights than the invaders because they are more important to the ecosystem as a whole - generally they have co-existed with the natural environment for many hundreds, or even thousands of years, whereas the invaders are very quick at destroying it altogether "

Hmm....why does this story sound familiar? Should we start euthanizing ourselves now?

Stifler's - posted on 01/13/2011

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^catch neuter release sounds like an awesome idea. or euthanasia. i hate cats, climbing my screens and wrecking them and then apparently it's somehow my doing when the real estate asks?

Jodi - posted on 01/13/2011

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"why is another animal's life more important than the cat's life?"



Because it isn't the cat's natural environment......it's akin to taking over land rights by killing off the natives, totally wrong and inappropriate. The natives should have more rights than the invaders because they are more important to the ecosystem as a whole - generally they have co-existed with the natural environment for many hundreds, or even thousands of years, whereas the invaders are very quick at destroying it altogether :D



I get what you are saying about it being difficult to rally support for killing animals of any kind, but I just believe that feral cats pose such a major problem for the environment in general that euthanasing is a more practical solution. However, we need this in conjunction with harsher penalties for dumping cats, and for not neutering your pet cats unless you are a registered breeder.

Jodi - posted on 01/13/2011

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Marina, it would help in the long term. But the short term is a problem in some regions too. Why is the cat's life more important than that of the native wildlife that will be killed by re-releasing the cat?

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/13/2011

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But Jodi, it would definately help! The poppulation of cats would decrease...the life of a wildlife cat does not have a high expectancy..so is going to decrease the amount of ferril cats eventually. But, I have no idea how overpopulated Australia is with wild cats...it could take a while to see the effects and benefits.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/13/2011

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I am sorry about your experience Kaleigh,,,someone should report that kid...isn't that how axe murderer start? Torturing defensless animals?

Jodi...I cannot respond to Australia and the cat's killing the wild life...but I would hope that people would stop abandoning cats and dogs in order to ensure this will stop happeining? That is terrible. I still can't agree with the euthinasia, but I can see why you would support it.

[deleted account]

The cat my mom adopted a few years ago was $100, plus cost of microchipping, shots, neutering etc. the hundred didn't include anything for the cat so thats why it came across as just a profitable fee, "adoption fee" she could have just been ripped off on that occasion who knows. I'm not speaking for all of the animal shelters when i adopted i was just told he was found ditched to die (too young to feed himself) in the neighbourhood so I took him in at the door. I just know from other people about the adoption charges and i know about the drop off charges from trying to get them to pick up a batch of kittens I found, another time because of a dog wandering in the street.

[deleted account]

Thank you Marina I will definately look into it for next time, I'll ask around since I don't have a vet because we don't have a pet anymore some kids stole our cat Fred. He was a stray originally but was soooo good its just that he'd book it when the door was open. The one day he booked it out front but he wouldn't leave my sight so I just brought Aiden outside for us all to play. So because it went well that became our routine once a day we would take Fred out for some fresh air and he toned down in hyperness (outdoor cats just cant stay cooped up). One day we were outside Aiden decided to book it for the park so when I chased him down and brought him back I immediately noticed Fred was no longer on our lawn...strange I had a funny feeling about it. So I asked my neighbour to watch Aiden so I could go find Fred. I got as far as the corner and saw a group of preteen boys trying to coax him out from under a bush by poking at him with sticks. As I sped up towards them (you could hear poor Fred meowing he was scared) I knew exactly what was going on. I saw the biggest kid grab Fred by the neck and rip off his collar so I shouted at them and ran faster. That brat had the balls to say "Oh it's just a stray go home" so I told him "Thats my cat you little brat btw 'its' name is on his collar you just took off give him back NOW" He begrudgingly handed Fred to me and the collar and said that the collar must have fell off him. I informed those kids if I ever saw them badgering my or any other cat again I'd have a word with his mother and report them. Fred was so scared he wouldn't leave my side for two days. Later that month once we were back to our outside routine one of my neighbours let loose their dog and it chased Fred away, when I tried to find him again he was gone. Later that evening a lady and her little girl brought him back apparently the little girl tried to convince her mother that Fred "followed" her home. After that Fred didn't go outside, we stayed in since I couldn't risk him running off again. Then one day as I was leaving with Aiden for an appointment Fred took off out the door, I tried to coax him back into the house but he wouldn't go in, he didn't run away but was determined to stay out of arms reach. I said fine Fred I'll catch you when we get back, and we left. That was the last time we saw Fred, bout a week later that evil kid who had tormented him before brought me Fred's collar. I asked him where my cat was (everyone in the neighbourhood had helped me look and knew we wanted him back) he just laughed at me shrugged his shoulders dropped the collar on the ground and walked away. I cried for 2 days solid, refused to leave the house in case he wandered back for a week on top of that, and didn't give away his bed, toys, etc. for two weeks after that. Aiden still asks for Fred on occasion, it gets me bawling everytime. I was given a new kitten several months later but it wasn't the same, Aiden wasn't fooled by the replacement cat, and this cat was horrible nothing like Fred. I gave it away shortly after. Since then I find it difficult to look at cats the same when a beloved pet like Fred is treated like a rat or a guinea pig by everyone else then whats the point. I gotta be honest I'm not fond of animals anymore so I don't get attached. It makes me sick to see malnourished strays or abused animals on tv but I wont adopt again. Hunni wants a dog he just thinks I hate animals and I'll get over it if I get attached, I don't hate them but I wont get attached. Hunni doesn't really know the whole story with Fred he just knows Aiden misses him. Sorry for the long post but I know from experience if you just tell people you don't like animals they'll rag on you about it, and that bugs me because I'm not cruel.

Jenn - posted on 01/13/2011

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@Kaleigh - I think their fee for adopting an animal includes the microchipping, neutering, and shots, etc.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/13/2011

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Kaleigh, alot of areas have "no Kill" shelters...you can probably ask your vet for a list...or try online. I know where I use to live...they were kept under wraps becouse of how many they would get.,..soemtimes they have to stop taking pets in...it gets overwhelming...but atleast it is an option to look into incase you do come across more abandoned kittens. Also, look into vet clinics if you want to adopt for a cheaper price...sometimes they will only charge an adoption fee. The clinic that I worked at that did the catch and release, well we had a slew of ferril cats in our own yard that we would catch....the momma cat was hard to get...infact I think it was her 4th litter that we finally caught her...but we would get the kittens once weened...spay and adopt them out right in our clinic! That was such an awesome place to work! But look into the no kill shelters....they are pretty amazing.



Edited to add *if the clinic adopts out cats, they may just take that box of kittens from you free of charge!*

Kate CP - posted on 01/13/2011

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I am in favor of the CSNR programs. It cuts down on LOTS of problems and disease.

Tara - posted on 01/13/2011

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When we had our farm, 3 times people just stopped at the bottom of my driveway and dump their cats, the poor things would hide in our barn until I could coax them out with fish guts or chicken livers. Then I took them to the shelter where they found homes, but only because they weren't wild, they were domesticated unwanted cats.

[deleted account]

They neuter all the cats that come into the spca here which I think is good the only thing I dislike about the way they run things is their "fees". I understand they don't have unlimited funds but they're getting a little excessive and it is leading to some real problems. If you find a stray and want to give it to the spca they charge you a fee so around here many people who find cats just leave them running around, also people who for some reason accept kittens left right and center that they can't or wont keep will throw them outside instead of taking them in. As you can imagine there are malnourished cats all over this city getting hit by vehicles/ attacked by dogs/racoons/skunks etc. and even being picked up by evil kids who abuse them for kicks. I understand it is the people that are the problem not the spca but I for one can not afford to run around town and pick up all the strays to take them in. I'm at fault like anyone else if I see a batch of kittens under a car I have to walk away, best I can do is call the spca and convince myself they will do something even though I know they wont. It's horrible but its the way it is.
What gets to me even more is if you want to adopt a cat from the spca you need to be able to afford the neutering costs, microchip costs, costs for all the shots deworming etc. and then to top it off they charge their own fee. I don't know for sure if its to get a profit but their fee seems hefty. They make it very difficult to adopt an animal so most people don't bother and as a result they have animals sit there for however long only to be euthanized, which seems to me like it would cost more money in the long run. It's not a friendly thought and I'm sorry to offend anyone with cats but here they are like pests treated no differently than rats :(. It's really sad and I don't understand why the spca cant see that their actions are perpetuating the cycle.

Tara - posted on 01/13/2011

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I think the program is wonderful and has been used successfully in many parts of Ontario, my home town included.
It doesn't cut down on the number of cats that are dumped by their owners every year, but it does reduce the number of cats born to feral or stray parents, thereby reducing the overall number of strays.
Better than just killing them, cause those that don't get killed can still go on to produce babies, I read somewhere once the one female cat can produce up to 97 kittens in her lifetime.
That's a lot of feral/wild cats every year. I think spaying and neutering programs are the most humane and the most effective means of dealing with strays.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/13/2011

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All my cats have been declawed and indoors....yes I know declawing is a whole other debate. But most declawed cats should be kept indoors period for their protection.

[deleted account]

I totally agree with the Catch-Neuter-Release thing, thats how they have done it in my area for years. They also have free and discount spay and neuter clinics for people who can't afford full price. When my cat had her kittens I took mama and her 3 kittens down, they all got fixed for $20.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/13/2011

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All my pets that I have owned have been spayed and neutered...



This kind of thing has been going on for a very long time...this catch, spay/neuter, clip ear and release....also places will check for feleuk/fiv....unfortunately unless these infected cats had a home to go to directly after the surgery, they would be euthinized. These are to contagious of a disease to release back to the outdoors.



Edited *if they did not have a home to go to, and they were postive for these highly deadly and contagious disease, they would not have the surgery..they would be euthinized....if they had a home to go to, they would have the surgery.....i just wanted to make that abundantly clear*

Jackie - posted on 01/13/2011

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I think it's a better idea than euthanasia.

I have a cat and he's a pain in the ass to keep in the house. He's tagged and neutered but he most likely poops in peoples yards sometimes. I don't know about anyone else but my cat will rip me a new a$$hole if I try to put a leash on him

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/13/2011

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I think this is a wonderful idea. I worked for a clinic that participated in this kind of a thing,,,,this one client would catch as many cats as she could...bring them in, spay/neuter them..we would also clip the left ear (Ithink the left) so people would know that cat was already fixed. She would actually pay for this all herself...we would give her a huge discount, but she needed to bring in atleast 3 at a time..that was tricky but she did it! She even found homes for the kittens and would give them away.

Jenn - posted on 01/13/2011

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Also, if you are a cat owner, do you add to the problem? Do you let your cats run free? Are they neutered? The cats that I have had were indoor cats, who were also neutered. I personally hate it when other people's cats run around the neighbourhood and poop in my yard! GRR!!! Funny how people keep their dogs tied up (because it's the law), but yet they think it's OK to let their cats run around wild.

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