Censorship?

Adrienne - posted on 12/22/2009 ( 15 moms have responded )

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What are your views on censoring your children? What they watch, what activities they are exposed to, etc. Personally, I don't believe in censoring my children's intake at all. They ARE going to be exposed to adult content and I would prefer to be there to provide a loving avenue of support and information rather than have my LO exposed to things secondhand or without my knowledge. I was never censored as a child, so that probably has something to do with my view. I think that it turned me into a more mature and responsible young adult, because I was always treated as such...

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Cassie - posted on 12/22/2009

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I believe that children are children and should be treated as such. In some respects, I think it is great to treat children as mini adults, such as having open lines of communication; I think though that it is our job as parents to shield our children from many of the things that are inappropriate for them. For items such as television, there are many shows that I believe should be censored. As a teacher, I can tell which children are allowed to watch anything on television and those children whose parents monitored what their children watch. The children who are allowed to watch anything, have been exposed to shows containing graphic adult content. Their young brains do not completely understand the difference between reality and fantasy and they have a hard time differentiating what they see on tv from everyday life. I think it's sad. They are afraid of things they should have never seen and bring up topics that are completely inappropriate for class discussions.



I will be censoring what my children are exposed to, from what they watch to whom they meet. For example, my mother's side of the family is into the drug and alcohol scene. I have chosen that my children will not be interacting with them because their choices and actions are inappropriate and would only hurt my children. It is part of our job as a parent to protect our children from the things they need not be exposed to at a young age.

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Rosie - posted on 01/13/2010

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i completely agree with you adrienne. i was raised that way and i was a very responsible child, teenager and adult. i do however believe it is also determined by the child. my oldest child has a hard time with social things (i'm having him checked for aspergers soon) and he cannot handle alot of the things he sees on tv, no matter how hard i try to explain things to him. my other 2 children seem fine (socially) so i will continue to do things my way. i do however limit (not completely banish)their intake on sex, and violence. they're not ready for that type of stuff quite yet.

Christy - posted on 01/08/2010

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Quoting Michelle:

I was heavily censored as a child (I wasn't allowed to play super mario because you kill things, and I couldn't watch Rugrats because "that's not how children are supposed to behave," you get the idea) and I don't think that was right. When I started getting older and started to see and hear things that my mom had kept me from I had so many questions and interests that I couldn't discuss with my mom. I think children should see things because they DO happen, and, for me, it's a form of education. Not only that, but those of us who had strict parents always found a way anyway, so I'd rather my kids saw these things at home, when I was there to kind of guide them through any questions. Obviously I'm not going to sit down with a four year old and watch Hostel, there are limits and filters, but if I think my kids are mature enough to see something, I have no problem with that.


i wasn't allowed to watch Rosanne because their kids were bad!! and it was the same with video games for me too. it's nice knowing that other people had to put up with the same crap that i did as a kid =)

Michelle - posted on 01/08/2010

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I was heavily censored as a child (I wasn't allowed to play super mario because you kill things, and I couldn't watch Rugrats because "that's not how children are supposed to behave," you get the idea) and I don't think that was right. When I started getting older and started to see and hear things that my mom had kept me from I had so many questions and interests that I couldn't discuss with my mom. I think children should see things because they DO happen, and, for me, it's a form of education. Not only that, but those of us who had strict parents always found a way anyway, so I'd rather my kids saw these things at home, when I was there to kind of guide them through any questions. Obviously I'm not going to sit down with a four year old and watch Hostel, there are limits and filters, but if I think my kids are mature enough to see something, I have no problem with that.

?? - posted on 01/08/2010

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I don't like the idea of censorship. I would prefer to educate, rather than censor. I'm not ALWAYS going to be around to turn off / hide something from my son, but I am ALWAYS here to teach him about the who's, what's, why's, when's, where's and how's behind things that he will be exposed too.



Obviously, his mentality, maturity and personality will be a key factor in making sure what he is exposed to is as age appropriate as possible but even then there are always going to be instances where a kid will see things a kid isn't ready to see.



I'll be involved in his life, involved in educating him, keeping him appropriately informed and do everything I can to make sure he understands what he is seeing, hearing and feeling. I won't stop him from seeing something just because it means I will have to take time to explain what it means though. I would rather him see it, know what it means and be able to express whatever thoughts, feelings and ideas he has about it than censor him from it until eventually one day he sees it anyways and doesn't say anything about it at all.

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I don't believe in censorship but I do think it is a parent's job to filter and moniter what their children are exposed to. Content needs to be appropriate for that child's age and maturity level. Parents also need to be aware of what their kids' friends are reading and watching because more than likely their children will be exposed to it. Forbidding it is not the way to go. Keep an open mind so that when kids are exposed to mature content you can explain and discuss it with your children.

Christy - posted on 01/04/2010

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i haven't yet decided what i'm going to do about censoring things with my daughter. my parents went waaay overboard with me, i wasn't allowed to watch anything PG till i was 6, PG 13 till i was, well 13 (and that was my mom's call, dad STILL wanted to be a prick about it), and was never technically allowed to watch R rated movies while living at home. thing is, my best friend was allowed to watch whatever she wanted whenever she wanted and her mom liked to corrupt me so she would tell us to pick the goriest horror movies we could find at the video store hahaha. speaking from experience, the more you try to shelter your child, the more awful things they will try to watch/listen to just to see how much they can get away with behind your back.

i think it will depend on my daughter's personality really. if she's the kind of kid that has tons of nightmares, no scary/excessively violent movies for her no matter what the rating. on the same note, i don't think i'll really care about the language or nudity factor as long as i teach her that we're not to say or do the things that she sees in movies, which i think is important no matter what we "let" our children watch.

?? - posted on 12/30/2009

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Quoting Krista:

And it's REALLY not easy to explain why David Caruso is still working.




It's a Shatner kinna thing

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IDK? I think it would be pretty easy 2 explain why ppl kill ppl? However, trying to explain why ppl hate is a pickle for me!

Krista - posted on 12/28/2009

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Quoting Laura:

I must admit that I found it funny that I was allowed to see all the violence I wanted as well but also no sex. It makes me think my experience with censorship was to save my mother's comfort level than to stop me from seeing anything harmful. (She just didn't want any awkward questions )

I personally would rather my kids turn on the playboy channel (not that we have it) than a documentary about the holocaust I can explain sex...that's natural. Mass murderers are something different.


I feel the same way. I guess that's why I thought it was so hilarious that people were freaking out and screaming "Won't someone think of the children?" when Janet Jackson's nip-slip occurred, but NOBODY protests the fact that CSI, which regularly shows very realistic depictions of corpses and violence, airs right after the evening news -- prime family-viewing time. I'd MUCH rather my kid see a pair of boobs or a bare ass (or even full-blown sex) than a bloated, rotting corpse being hauled out of a river while David Caruso stands at a three-quarters angle, constantly removing and replacing his sunglasses. It's easy to explain why people have sex. What's not easy to explain is why people kill each other. And it's REALLY not easy to explain why David Caruso is still working. I mean, won't someone think of the children? 

Isobel - posted on 12/28/2009

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I must admit that I found it funny that I was allowed to see all the violence I wanted as well but also no sex. It makes me think my experience with censorship was to save my mother's comfort level than to stop me from seeing anything harmful. (She just didn't want any awkward questions )

I personally would rather my kids turn on the playboy channel (not that we have it) than a documentary about the holocaust I can explain sex...that's natural. Mass murderers are something different.

Mel - posted on 12/26/2009

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we were raised by mum and always allowed to watch horror from about age 5 but nothing past PG with sex scenes. And I loved it as a kid scaring my brother with freddy kruger, exorcist all the rest since he was 2 years younger. But now that im older I cant watch gore. Dad always let us watch movies with sex but nothing violent.



Not sure how I will be with our daughter but her dad will most likely have her wtching horror early on as he is a big fan

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I also do not feel compelled to shield my child from EVERYTHING, although I do try to limit violence content and racism...I only try to shield racism because its kinda hard to explain to a 3 yr old why some people are just STUPID and hate people for the color of their skin :( so we'll conquer that one later, but when he's around things adult content I'm there to tell him that "no we don't do that..." or explain what he is seeing... as children we were also not put in little bubbles watching only G rated shows and I don't feel that my siblings and I are out of touch w/life... I always thought that the kids whose parents left them to figure things out @ school or WHERE EVER? they found things out from were the troubled ones when reality hit them in the face!

Krista - posted on 12/22/2009

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I think that there are certain things (specifically, some forms of violence) from which I'd want to shield my kid until I think they're emotionally mature enough to understand things a little better and to verbalize what they're feeling. But, I also realize that you can't (and shouldn't) keep them hidden away from the world, either, so we have to always be prepared to answer those tough questions.

Adrienne - posted on 12/22/2009

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That is true, it is our job to protect them. In my experience as a teacher and child care provider, the children that had trouble with the fantasy/reality line and dealing with unfounded fears stemming from that, were the children left exposed to anything and everything. Also they were generally left without the appropriate support system. I never had problems differentiating between fact and fantasy as a child. My parents just made sure they were present and available to explain things and answer questions. Also growing up I never had any "rebellious" phases nor did I mess around with sex, drugs, or alcohol. Largely due to the facts that my parents kept me informed about the good and bad points of both, and what I would be giving up/risking if I chose that path. Thus I felt that I was in charge of the decision to do the smart thing.

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