Christian denominations

Merry - posted on 06/21/2011 ( 65 moms have responded )

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What denomination are you?
What denominations do you consider to be 'valid' Christians?
I know many Catholics disagree strongly with Lutherans and vice versa but is there more?
I'm non denominational so I don't understand the nit picky stuff some denominations fight over.
Why are there so many disputes between different denominations?
Do you think only your denomination is getting into heaven?

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Veronica - posted on 06/22/2011

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I have to agree with Krista E on this one ;) I am raised catholic (i think holy roman - but some orthodox in there too...) anyhow -- I was very into my catholic faith, until i met my husband. I started having to battle a friend of his, who isnt catholic (unsure of what 'religion' he followed) - he would make comments or ask me why we did this, or accused me of that - for the last 8 years ive been sitting here battling and standing up for catholicism. Now, im not going to bash down catholicism - but because of the battles, i decided to really delve into the bible for answers to these questions - and started noticing a lot of controversial things between what the bible taught and what the catholic church was teaching -- and am now starting to pull away.
My husband and i had some bad marital problems in the last couple of months - we went to see a pastor at a bible study church. and this is what he said - and it made the most sense to me, in all my life =--- He said, its not about religion. Imagine man being on one hill, and God is on the other hill. Through religion - man has been trying everything to get to God - trying to build a bridge from one hill to the other --- they go to church, they do good deeds, they give alms, etc. etc. but this has only been little stepping stones, and hasn't been enough to make it to the other hill. The ONLY way to God, is the cross -- through Jesus Christ. (so he drew this out, and put the cross in the middle as a bridge from the hill the man was on, to the hill God was on.) Through Christ, repenting -- will we get to heaven, will we get to God. Church, good deeds, alms -- all things that you do, with Christ at your side.

This explanation has given me more purpose and more drive to go to church and worship, to do good deeds, to give alms -- it gives purpose to it now.
I accepted Christ in my life for the first time, without all the religious babble involved - and since then, he has given me a hunger to learn more, seek him more, ask him more -- and my life has been more fulfilled now, than it ever was before.

So - denominations are not important when it comes to heaven - cause its not going to get you there -- only Christ will. Period.

Krista - posted on 06/22/2011

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I was baptized Roman Catholic, went to Sunday school, had my Confirmation, the whole 9 yards. But I never believed any of it. :) As far as "valid" Christians, I think if you strive to follow Christ's teachings, even if you are doubtful about the whole supernatural part of it, you can call yourself a Christian. But that's just my opinion.

And I think that there are so many disputes between different denominations because people are scared.

They want to be RIGHT. They want to be 100% sure that they're right about it all and that they're going to go to Heaven.

So, when other denominations pop up, that forces people to face the fact that other possibilities exist. And, if other possibilities exist, then perhaps THEY'RE the ones that are right.

This is very threatening -- if you've invested your life and your energy into a certain faith, you do NOT want to think about the possibility that you might be wrong. That you might be completely off track. That you might not get into Heaven. That scares the shit out of people.

And when people are scared, they get angry. And what makes them feel better? Telling those other denominations, "We're right and you're wrong." And the stakes are very, very high, because these people believe in souls and eternity and all of that good stuff.

Hence, the disputes. I don't think that people who bash other faiths are trying to persuade the other faiths that they're wrong. They're trying to comfort themselves and quell any internal doubts.

There's my armchair psychoanalysis. That'll be 50 cents, please. ;)

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Yep, I am a Christian (Methodist, specifically). We do have some really good religious discussions, especially when my dad (the pastor) comes over and he and my hubby get into these deep philisophical religious discussions. Honestly, at the very core the two faiths are very similar, it's just that a lot of people CHOOSE to not see the similarities :)



Honestly, I have more faith than religion at this time in my life and I am more content that I can ever remember being in my faith journey.

Desiree - posted on 06/23/2011

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Laverne sorry to disappoint you but the Baptist only came into being in 1609 in Amsterdam with English Seperatist John Smyth as the pastor. He rejected baptism for infants and only believing Adults are baptised. They are considered as Protesants. Baptism must be complete immersion as apposed to sprinkling and other beliefs in Baptist churches include soul competency (liberty), salvation through faith alone, scripture alone as the rule of faith and practice, and the autonomy of the local congregation. Sorry but it has nothing to do with John the Baptist except maybe he also immersed the believer in water. Although there were Baptists before that but were called Anabaptist which is from the Greek for rebaptiser. again they came about during the reformation.

Jane - posted on 06/23/2011

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Pretty much every time a group of folks in a church disagree with the rest of the church, they go off and start another denomination. Since these denominations begin because of disagreement, it is all too easy for them to go on as they have begun. Thus, disputes between denominations are part of there being denominations. And one of the disputes between denominations is whether only folks in your own denomination go to Heaven, or all Christians do, or all good people do, or some variation of the above.



The Catholic church isn't even all one big group either. In the past there have even been two Popes at the same time, and various parishes do things different ways. Two parishes in our town refused to baptize our daughter as her Catholic birth parents asked, but a third, under the exact same bishop, was happy to do it.



A valid Christian is anyone who believes they are following the teachings of Jesus Christ. You or I might not think they are doing a very good job of it, but they are still Christians.



And Christianity isn't the only religion with different denominations. Just about all of the major religions have different and disagreeing denominations. Examples include Sunni and Shiite Muslims, Orthodox, Conform, Messianic, and Conservative Jews, Shaivism, Shaktism, Vaishnavism, and Smartism in the Hindu religion, Heravada, Mahayana, and Vajrayana Buddhism, and more.



To paraphrase, wherever there are two religious people, there are three opinions about how to worship.



As to what denomination I am, it depends. I was raised as a Congregationalist, a group not too different in many ways from the Presbyterians and that is one that believes in baptizing babies with a few drops of water. I also attended the Church of Christ, another group of renegade Presbyterians, who go in for full immersion baptism when you are old enough to choose it. For a while we attended a mixed race, independent church that started as a prison ministry. The members loved scarf dancing, speaking in tongues, dancing in the aisles, shouting "Amen, Jeeeeesus!," riding motorcycles, and never minded if my son lay on the floor making truck noises during service.



I have also been attending an independent Christian church, founded by a pastor who was raised as a Baptist but didn't agree with all the Baptist ideas. Now there is a new pastor so I am sure the church is going to change. In actuality, I am an atheist but I need to be around people who care about others and this church fills the bill.



My mother was a Unitarian, my Dad an Episcopalian non-believer, and I have relatives who are Jewish, Quaker, Catholic, Hindu, Buddhist, Southern Baptist, and a whole bunch of other churches.

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Elizabeth - posted on 07/19/2011

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Frances: LDS missionaries almost always close a lesson/ discussion/ visit with a prayer. I'm sure they'd love to pray with you!

Elizabeth - posted on 07/19/2011

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I'm a Latter-day Saint. I believe that anybody that has faith in Jesus Christ and strives to live His commandments is a "valid" Christian. However, one does not need to be a "card-carrying" Christian to be a good person. We believe that all religions have some grain of truth, some more than others.

From a LDS prespective, doctrines of denominations differ because the Church that Christ organized durring his mortal life was changed by men who did not have authority from God (which we call the Priesthood) and the apostals and prophets were persecuted. When the Priesthood was gone from the Earth, the world was left without direct guidance from Heaven (known as the Great Apostacy). Satan influenced men for his purposes. As we know, confusion and chaos are his favored tools. We believe that the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saint is the Church that Christ founded, restored in the latter days. (Break-out groups, such as the RLDS or FLDS are not considered members of our faith.)

As for getting into Heaven, we believe that every spirit that has ever come to Earth will have the opportunity to receive the Gospel. The people in the bushes of the Amazon never got a chance to hear about Jesus, so how could they learn his teaching and accept Him as the Messiah? God loves ALL of His children and wants them ALL to return to His presence.

Jessica - posted on 07/18/2011

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And yet, even you do not say acceptance of Jehovah witnesses. The people who came to MY door as a child were Jehovah Witness, not later days saints. They were not pushy, but did come around less when I associated with the baptists (eternal persecutors of every other path/religion/denomination), Though admittedly I could not remember anything but my own name, my inability to BE christian stems from them (mostly). The core problem with Christianity are three. "Denominations" ("Are you a christian or a denomination?".... someone actually asked this!!! Again. I am pagan. NOT every "good" person is christian!!!), the atrocious acts allowed to be committed in "gods name", and the "only way" theology. I have read the bible numerous times and looked up the "older" translations. Did you even know the bible was in fact changed A LOT!!! And the "the only way" thing.... didn't exist. they took a word out. "my only way", replace my with the, then add a sect who take an apostles opinion over "Jesus" preaching peace (this apostle didn't even say kill them, he stopped someone else from killing a witch), so you know what ppl did? they took things and went. "we think..." and that was the problem. Stupid people should not get ideas.... or be in positions of power. Things like my countries governments and the crusades tend to happen.

Dodie - posted on 07/17/2011

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I know a great deal about many Religions. As to the Members of the Church of Jesus Christ Latter Day Saints--they sometimes do refer to themselves as Mormons, but have tried to separate themselves from the sect, primarily located in Colorado, which sees poligamy as a good thing. The actual Church of Latter Day Saints are the young people who come to your door who have chosen this as their calling. They live on their own for two years, pay their own way, & are only trying to let people know that they are out there! They also look after their members better than any other Religion I have either been part of or have studied. My step-daughter was a single Mom with 5 children when she met her first missionary. She was really down, both psychologically & financially! Before she was even thinking about joining the Church, they gave her a cheque for $2000.00 for Christmas for she & the children to have food for the month & presents under the tree for Christmas! She did end up joining the Church & marrying a man, whom we have come to love very much, who had been raised in the Church all his life. She also is proof that new "converts" are stronger followers than people who were raised within the parameters of the Church!! Not in a "preachy" way, just in her own quiet beliefs:)
There is a big difference between the Jehovah Witnesses & the Church of Latter Day Saints. To me, it isn't in the way they approach people, although I always thought, even before my step-daughter joined them, the the C of LDS were much less pushy the the JW's. However, it is in the way they raise their children. By my way of thinking, if you don't want your children to participate in Birthday Parties, Christmas, Easter, the singing of the National Anthem, etc., then have your own school system. My daughters went to school with a little girl--going back about 20 years here, Ladies:)--who was from a Family who were members of the JWs. She was miserable because the other kids didn't understand why she couldn't do the things they did. She was often shunned because the others didn't know what to say to her. Whereas, with the C of LDSs, their children have the same types of holidays & holy days as the other Christian Religions do. So, they fit in. Oh, & by the way, my grandchildren Love the Lord of the Rings Trilogy, Harry Potter, etc. They are not stopped from reading comic books or other fantasy types of stories, as are the members of the JWs, if the parents are abiding by "the rules" of their Religion. That is my chief beef!
As to any other sect of Christianity out there--& there are many more than you realize--I believe that there is something out there for everyone! Hopefully, sometime in the not-too-distant future, we will all be able to put aside our differences & focus on our similarities--like monotheism, & Jesus actually being the Son of God, & Mary really being a Virgin Mother, & the Holy Spirit really being able to help & heal people! After all, as I tell my Family Members & Friends, Life springs eternal from the Human Breast!!
God Bless...Dodie/Nana

Frances - posted on 07/15/2011

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I have read my Bible through 34 times. I believe every genuine Christian should read their Bible through once per year.

Jessica - posted on 07/14/2011

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none.

I believe that by definition (little Christ) insinuates that all denominations are christian. Some are just too bigoted to accept this.

I think they should all just sit down and re-read the bible more thoroughly and actually take in what it says instead of what they or their preacher thinks it means.

I do not believe in heaven. I am pagan, however I have years of multi denominational study under my belt. I tried to be christian to please family members.



If people would just read the bible instead of listening so intently to a pastor, I don't think this problem would exist, and neither would the burning times have happened, my father would not be dead, and the world would be at virtual peace... especially since jesus preached peace and acceptance.



funny how that works.

Callie - posted on 07/13/2011

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i grew up primitive baptist, and met my husband 6 years ago and was baptized apostolic/pentecostal

Amanda - posted on 06/24/2011

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I was raised holiness. I am Apostolic Holiness. I believe that if you ask forgiveness for your sins, and are truly sorry and believe Jesus died for your sins,He will forgive you. I believe that the plan of salvation is in Acts 2:38. I do not think that only my denomination will be in Heaven nor am I even going to try to say who will and who will not. I just believe that Christians live by what the Bible says and do the best they can in their daily lives.

Dodie - posted on 06/24/2011

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Well, Ladies, I think Holly, to a certain extent, has hit the proverbial nail on the head! Instead of focusing on our differences in each of our Religious Sects, we should try to focus on the commonalities we have! We used to have some really great non-denominational Music nights. We had Choirs from the Baptist Church, United Church, Anglican Church, Catholic Church, & a Christ of Disciples Church, all singing indivudually in front of a mixed congregation. Then, after that was done, we would have a Hymn Sing, where the people from the Congregation would request certain of their favourites! Then all the Choirs & the Congregation would sing them together!! All the rest of our Choirs were very jealous:) of the Baptist Choir because they not only had men as members, but they had this one man who sang the most powerful Bass I have ever heard!!!
We had food & fellowship afterward, the food being brought in by various members of the Congregation to feed themselves & the Members of the various Choirs!! We all came together for the same two things--Love of God & Love of Music dedicated to God!!
As far as the idea of having more Faith than religion as we get older, that's not a bad thing, in & of itself. However, as Parents/Grandparents we have a duty to our Children/Grandchildren to allow them to know God by, I believe, taking them to whatever sect we belong to for at least Sunday Service. Too many Parents don't see the value in that, so they slough off their responsibilities & ease their concience by sending them to Sunday School for other people to deal with it. Personally, I believe in what my Father told me when I was still a teenager.
If you have a "friend who does a lot for you who lives down the street, & you do nothing for him/her, not even a visit now & again; wouldn't you think that your "friend" would eventually get tired of doing all the "work" in the relationship, & stop doing things for you or visiting you? So it is with God, said my Father many times. He has many houses, yes, that's true. So, why not pick one that's convenient & go visit? He certainly does more for us than anyone else.
Also, as Parents/Grandparents, we teach by example. What example are we giving our Children/Grandchildren, if we can't even be bothered to take them to Sunday Service, never mind being involved with the extracurricular activities that your local Church provides? Children live what they learn. If they learn to be lazy as regards relationships--God or Human--because we are lax in our "Relationship Duties", it is then our responsibility & we have to deal with whatever happens to them Spiritually, as well as Socially. Also, it would be interesting to see how many Parents out there read books or talk to their children about God & what He gave us to oversee & how badly we have neglected that responsibility?
Well, I'm off to finish up my gardens for the summer! My radishes & roses are calling me!!:)
Have a Great Weekend, All, & God Bless...Dodie/Nana

Desiree - posted on 06/23/2011

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Holly thats interesting because over here they kept on coming and my mom was a divorced woman living on her own with 4 kids. She studies different religions, says you can't fight something if you don't know what you are talking about. Know plenty of one topic and a little about many topics. And always double check your facts before talking and looking like an idiot. She has a point.
But tomorrow is Saturday a time for te weekly pests to visit. Maybe I should put some kind of plaque on the wall. What do you think would work?

[deleted account]

Thanks for answering my question, Holly. I'd like to be a fly on the wall during one of those discussions. Yes, I can see how the two faiths are incredibly similar...but still so different.

Dodie - posted on 06/23/2011

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Actually, there are several theories on the "origin" of the "Baptist Church". In fact, there are many sects that all come under the "Baptist" title. It is an interesting history. I was a religious student as part of my University Studies as a Much Younger Woman:) I'm sure, now that you can find darn near anything on the internet, if you "google"/whatever "Baptist Religious History" you will get as many versions of that as you will "beginnings" in the various "Baptist" sects.
Just some food for thought!...Dodie/Nana
PS Man oh Man!! Did I just post a short one? Must be tired! It's past 10 PM here on the East Coast:) Nitey-Nite, All!! & God Bless!!

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I didn't know that Holly. Very interesting. And if I'm not mistaken, don't you consider yourself Christian? Sorry if I'm off here. I bet religious discussions are quite lively in your household. ;)

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Sara, didn't your Grandma know that the Mormon boys can't come in your house if the "man of the house" isn't there? Seriously. They've shown up a few times when my hubby isn't home and I've invited them in anyway and they said they can't because of their church teachings. I think it's weird, but who am I to judge?

My hubby is actually Muslim (he converted in 2005), but he's still very open about learning about different religions and he's actually found it quite interesting to see how similar a lot of different religions are. He's always up to talk religion (no matter what people say about staying away form the topic - lol) and he's always been very good about being respectful of other people's opinions... as long as they stay respectful of his :)

[deleted account]

Holly, totally reminds me of my Paw Paw. He was not religious at all (a wonder all his children turned religious...lol). He'd invite them in, roll up a cigarette, and talk for hours.

When he wasn't home, my Granny would turn out all the lights and make us sit on the floor under the window so the Mormons/JW would think no one was home...lol.

[deleted account]

Eh, we buy the Mormon boys pizza and invite them into our home to chat. I actually find the conversations entertaining and sometimes it shows that there are a lot of similarities... not enough similarities to attend their church or convert, but a few...

Frances - posted on 06/23/2011

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Another way to make Mormons or Jehovah Witnesses run away is to offer to pray with them.

A friend of mine tries to convert them to Christianity. They must have made a record of where he lives. None of them visit him anymore.

Desiree - posted on 06/23/2011

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Jen unfortunatly for the general Christian population "New age or reborn or even born again" give us not very nice names and in many cases can turn one against our beliefs because of their pushy attitude. My husband has gone so far as to inform pesky Mormons and Jehova Witnesses who do thier rounds on a regular basis that he is a "Satanist" just to get rid of them. But saying that we are Catholics seems to be an invitation to drive us around the bend but their insistance. My Gran who was a devout Catholic even resorted to hiding and one time slaming the door in their face. Some people just can't take a hint.

Desiree - posted on 06/23/2011

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at the end of the day its not whether the group, denomination, sect, cult or whatever the "church" is called. Catholic, Anglican, Metodist, Baptist or Lutherian. It not the group who is tolerant or not it is the individual are you a librial, or conservative or evangilist or charismatic it all depends on the out look in life or if you know enough about the history of religion and your churches to tell whether or not you are tolerant of others or not. I find that the converts tend to be more fanatic than those who have been bought up in the faith. A christian is any person who believes in the teachings of Christ and in Christ himself. Old or new it doesn't matter.

[deleted account]

I was raised Episcopalian in an area that is heavily dominiated by either Irish or Polish Catholic. I always knew there was a difference. The idea of one type of christian being better than the other never occurred to me until 1997 when on an online message board and was told that I was going to hell because I wasn't a born-again variety. Poor fellow. He never knew that this one statement caused me to question my entire faith in Christianity and eventually drop it altogether.

Frances - posted on 06/23/2011

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I am part of the International Conservative Holiness Association. It is similar to Pilgrim Holiness. I do not consider a denomination to be valid if they do not believe that Jesus is the Son of God. Then I consider them to be a cult. I believe that anyone who has truly repented of their sins is ready for heaven, they don't have to be part of my denomination. They also have to obey the Lord with all the knowledge they have of right and wrong.

My denomination is not pentecostal; we do not speak in tongues.

Lacye - posted on 06/23/2011

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I am a Methodist. I love it. To me, it seems like we are more tolerant about some things than other denominations.

Happy - posted on 06/23/2011

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@ Desiree. Baptist were not part of the Reformation.Baptist religion dates back to John the Baptist. We were before the Catholic church.

Dodie - posted on 06/23/2011

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Well, first of all, it's not the fault of the "denomination" that people are nit-picky & fighting with other "denominations"! The various Denominations sprung up from Catholicism--the original Christian Faith--because people couldn't agree on both Human Regulations & what the 10 Commandments really mean, collectively & singly, & what guidelines should be used to teach the "rules". For example--& I'm not pointing fingers, just giving historic facts--the Anglican, or Church of England as it was originally called, began because King Henry VIII broke from Rome over wanting to divorce his Queen to marry another woman. The Hugenots (I always spell this wrong, so I apologize if this offends anyone.), broke for reasons of what they saw as suppression of various rights & freedoms which I will not go into here. Others, like the Amish & Quakers, etc.--again, not lumping them together as "the same", just for part of the reason they segregated--formed not only new Christian Sects, but a whole "Community" way of Life dedicated to what they believe was a simpler, less cluttered way to Live & Worship God.
I was raised a Roman Catholic. I attended a Parish School taught by the Sisters of Charity--an organization of Women commonly called "Nuns". My Children were Baptized in the same Church. However, when I married a second time & was moving to the Country, there was no Catholic Church for over 1/2 hours drive away. So, since I wanted my Children to experience a "Community Religious Experience"--Go to Mass on Sunday with people whom they knew--I began to attend our local Anglican Church which was attended by a number of Families from our area that we socialized with outside of "Religion". Although Rome doesn't recognize the Church of England at the moment, there are Synods--groups coming together from various Christian Sects--to debate various points on which they differ to try to find a common ground, which is really quite extensive, unless you start to look at the "nit-picky" rules that each Sect has found necessary to put into effect. There are more similarities between the RCs' & the Anglicans than there are among all the other different Sects, I believe, because The Anglican Church sprang up so long ago, & in the beginning, didn't really want to separate from the Church in Rome. King Henry only wanted to get a Divorce. However, The Pope felt that, if he allowed that law change--Family is seen as not only a "social" but a "moral" obligation & necessary for proper raising of our children--there would be many more law-changes to follow. Hence, not only the break from RC but a forced following for the people of Great Britain at the time, on penalty of death. One of the major similarities between RC & Anglican Churches is the "Transubstantiation", which simply means that, unlike any other Churches, Christian or not, they believe that, during the process of their Mass, the Body & Blood of Jesus Christ, The Risen Lord, is actually present in the Bread & Wine consumed. (I'm pretty sure I spelled the word right, so you can "google" it for a more detailed explanation as to the reasoning behind it, if you like:)
I hope this hasn't "muddied the waters" for you, too much. Also, I hope noone will take offence to anything I have said, or how I have used only a couple of points to demonstrate their differences & similarities. There just isn't room enough here to get into too much detail. I hope this will give you some idea as to the differences. Just remember one thing, Laura: There is only One God. Christianity is a Mono-Theistic Religion. They all are supposed to follow the 10 Commandments, at least as they were "shortened" by Christ while He was on earth: "Love God above All Things, with your whole Heart, your whole Mind, & your whole Soul; and your Neighbour as yourself, for the Love of God." If you do that, I think that, whether you are "denominational" or not, you've got a good shot with Our Lord!!:)
God Bless...Dodie/Nana

Becky - posted on 06/23/2011

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Some of the most enjoyable churches I have been in have been international churches, or churches overseas. Some of them in countries where Christian worship is very restricted. The joy they express there is something I have found really lacking in many North American churches.

[deleted account]

Makes me glad I'm an atheist, if all the so-called christian religions are attacking each other!

Desiree - posted on 06/22/2011

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Kathy Heaven alone knows. One of our cabinet ministers got into a debate over here on this exact topic and he sid and I quote " All Catholics are Christians but not all Christians are Catholic" for some reason people like to bash the Catholic and is it not them its an attack on Jews. I do not talk religion with my sister in law at all because of her attitude to my beliefs and to Judaism. She told me that she doesn't have to be tolerant of either because Catholics don't know anything and the Jews killed Christ. I told her very politly and in no uncertain terms Catholisim gave us Christianity as we know it today and Judaism gave us Christ and that we must never forget that Christ was a Rabbi and a Jew. You can't discount family just because you don't like it. But like most children the parents are always wrong.

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I was raised a Catholic, now I'm an atheist. I think any religion based on Christ is Christian, and I've never been able to understand why some people say that Catholics aren't Christians.

Becky - posted on 06/22/2011

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My church hired a caterer and now they're not allowed to have potlucks anymore. Something about health codes or some nonsense. :( I love potlucks!

Stifler's - posted on 06/22/2011

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Oh yep the same. We had these people who came to church and they ran a catering company so there was really really good cake and chocolate stuff and marinated chicken wings MMM

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I love potlucks :) It's where everyone that comes brings food for everyone to share. It's great and it's always fun to try new things. PLUS, my dad's church has a lot of older people in it, so there's always delicious "grandma" food :D I'm telling you, it's a really good thing I danced so much when I lived there or I would have been so huge from potluck dinners at church! lol

Stifler's - posted on 06/22/2011

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Is that like fellowship dinner? Ohhh soo good all the desserts people used to make.

[deleted account]

Yeah, I get where you're coming from, and it's a very individual thing. I just thought I'd throw my own ideas out there :)

I know the Methodist church is considered "Pentecostal" but I never really thought of it that way. I'm Methodist, plain and simple... and we have potlucks... lots of potlucks... lol

Stifler's - posted on 06/22/2011

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I still believe in God and I'm not against religion but I'm against the Pentecostal church hahaha

[deleted account]

Emma - I kind of agree with you, but I kind of don't too... It's complicated for me right now.



My dad is a pastor, my mom is in the choir, my siblings and I were always in youth group (I ran the youth group my senior year in high school), I was in the bell choir, I taught sunday school (by myself, at BOTH services almost every Sunday) for 4 years, I was at every church clean-up event, I went with my dad on pastoral calls (especially at the care homes), I did a lot with and for the church. When I was 20 years old I was BURNED OUT on church. I moved away (to be with hubby) and found myself in my religion again. It took being AWAY from the church (and researching other religions) to discover what church really is (to me). While I may not believe in going to church every Sunday (I am way more spiritual by myself), I do believe in the community and the friends you can make there (friends who become family - there is one older couple at my dad's church who are like a second set of grandparents to me). While church isn't essential to me, I do like to go when I am visiting my parents to touch base with everyone (a lot of people at the church have known me since I was just a dream in my parent's heads) and to get my "community feeling." Plus I like to show off my girls :) Like I said before, it's a complicated and multi-faceted feeling for me, and it's hard to explain, but I feel like my complete immersion into the church in my young life led me to where I am now, so I am happy with it.

Stifler's - posted on 06/22/2011

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My parents were youth leaders, sunday school leaders, head deakons and yep none of us like church, because we were ALWAYS at church setting up, giving people money, helping idiots who in the end just screwed you and themselves over. there is such thing as too much church.

Happy - posted on 06/22/2011

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As the old joke goes, St. Peter was showing a new group of arrivals around heaven. "On your left is the Tree of Life. Just up ahead you will find the Crystal River. Before we get there though, you must be very quiet as we pass this subdivision." Peter explains. One of the new arrivals asks, "Why?" To which Peter retorts, "Because that's where the (insert any denomination you wish here, for sake of a punch line I will use - ) Baptists live. They think they are the only ones here!"

[deleted account]

I'm kind of a mutt. I was born into a non-denominational church...then moved to a different non-denominational church where I was baptized at the age of 5 by my choice. Around age 10 we moved to a Southern Baptist church. My dad resisted this move because of the politics known to be within SB churches. He says it was God's intervention. For years he'd be'd been interested in Prison Ministry and didn't know how to get into it. The Sunday after we'd joined the SB church he was invited to help out with a prison ministry and he's been doing it once a week every since...15 years. My parents moved from that church after my sister and I graduated (stayed because we had friends there) to a charismatic non-denominational church. In college I experimented with different denominations including non-christian ones. Nothing made me want to abandon my Southern Baptist roots. I married a man that was very involved with a SB church and that is where we go to this day. My sister is a bit of a drifter at the moment. She's dating a second generation Italian American Catholic, and has been to a gay/lesbian church, and a Korean church, and mostly non-denominational churches.



I think there are disputes because people interpret the Bible differently. I have a suspicion that when we get to Heaven God will laugh and say, "Where did you get that idea from?" But no one denomination is more right than the others. And I believe that as long as you believe Jesus is God's son sent to die for our sins then you are a Christian.

Desiree - posted on 06/22/2011

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Catholics, Greek and Russian fall under the banner of Orthodocs as we all know most other Christian beliefs Anglican (although they are almost identical to Catholics) Lutherians, Baptist, Methodists and a number of others fall under Protestant group (this because most of these groups protested against the orthodox churches.) and then we have the group that falls into secs Scientologists, Mormons, Jehovah Witnesses and the New age groups Rhema, Highway Families, and Evalistic Charismatic Churches. (Who pull in money like tere is no tomorrow, Scary stuff).
Personally I am Catholic but I don't believe that I or my group have the dibs on heaven. for me it all depends on who you are and what you do in life and when you face the man up stair how do you explain the choices you have made in life. And none of that crap the priest, my father, my mother, the nieghbour made me do it. I don't think he cares who made you do what I think he turns to us and says "But i gave you free will, the gift that not even my angles in heaven have, so again I ask WHY DID YOU.........?" Its up to me to answer Honestly and not give him any excuses.
I Toltally believe its my choices in life whether good or bad right or wrong that will be the ultimate deciding factor.

Teresa - posted on 06/22/2011

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Ha...no I don't think only my denomination gets into heaven. I think the nit picking actually earns you demerits if there is such a thing....lol. I believe there are many ways to heaven and the details are not quite as important as the intent. If you believe that Jesus was the son of God and died for your sins you are a Christian. How you live it out determines your place in eternity.

Sarah - posted on 06/22/2011

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I was never christened or anything (for which I'm very grateful!) but I went to a Church of England church when I was young and a Church of England Primary School.

Being that CofE was just a way for good old King Henry 8th to marry umpteen women......I don't really hold much stock with it at all!

I'm agnostic now, leaning towards atheism.
I don't like organised religion (or any denominations) at all.

Kate CP - posted on 06/21/2011

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I'm a Unitarian Universalist (UU). My husband calls it "the church of everything's cool". I love my faith. I don't believe in heaven. :D

Jaime - posted on 06/21/2011

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I was baptized 'United' (which is basically a Heinz 57 of a few denominations) when I was around 8 years old. I still have my Bible that was inscribed with my name and the date of my baptism. But baptism aside, I'm an atheist.

Charlie - posted on 06/21/2011

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my whole family including myself ( not my children) were baptised Church of England ...,.although I do not recall any of them actually going to church and I do not associate with the Church of England.

I am a chosen Atheist who has similar philosophy to that of buddhism.

I wont be going to heaven or hell after I die because I do not believe it exists , I choose to make my life here and now my heaven.

I never delved into the Chruch of England though .

[deleted account]

I'm Methodist. I like the Methodist denomination because it's the most open and accepting :)



Saying that, I don't judge people in the other denominations, and I don't think saying someone isn't a "valid" Christian based on their denomination isn't a very Chrisitian thought...



I honestly don't know why there are so many disputes between denominations, but it always makes me sad to hear about it.



I think anyone can get into heaven as long as they truly live their life in a good and non-selfish manner. Who am I to say that one person's religion is "bad" or "wrong" just because it's slightly different form mine? Once again, I believe that line of thought is very non-Christian and it bugs me to hear people say things like that.

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