Christian worker fired for not wearing 666 sticker

Tracey - posted on 11/21/2011 ( 120 moms have responded )

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Devout Christian 'fired for refusing to wear the number 666'-because he believed he would go to hell

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-...

A devout Christian factory worker was fired after he refused to wear a 666 sticker he feared would doom him to eternal damnation, a lawsuit has claimed.

Billy E. Hyatt says he was fired from Pliant Corp, a plastics factory in northern Georgia, near Dalton, after he refused to wear a sticker proclaiming that his factory had been accident-free for 666 days.

That number is considered the 'mark of the beast' in the Bible's Book of Revelation describing the apocalypse.
Hyatt, who said he's a devout Christian, had worked for the north Georgia plastics company since June 2007 and like other employees wore stickers each day that proclaimed how long the factory had gone without an accident.

But he grew nervous in early 2009, as the number of accident-free days crept into the 600s.

As the company's safety calendar approached day 666, Hyatt said he approached a manager and explained that wearing it would force him 'to accept the mark of the beast and to be condemned to hell.' He said the manager assured him he wouldn't have to wear the number.

When the day came on March 12, 2009, Hyatt sought a manager to discuss his request.

He said he was told that his beliefs were 'ridiculous' and that he should wear the sticker or serve a three-day suspension.
Hyatt took the three-day suspension, and was fired at a human resources meeting several days later. He then filed a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and his attorney Stephen Mixon said the agency granted him the right to sue the company in August.

The lawsuit, which seeks punitive damages and back pay, said the company forced him into a terrible situation: Keep his job or "abandon his religious beliefs."

Thoughts?
Personally I would have taken the day as holiday or had a sick day.

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Krista - posted on 11/21/2011

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I don't know...

I'm just looking at it from a different perspective. As many of you know, I'm atheist. I firmly believe that overall, religion has been a negative force for humanity. BUT...let's say I worked somewhere, and to promote an Easter event, they wanted all of the workers to wear a sticker with Jesus on it. I wouldn't be freaked out and terrified, like that guy in the OP. But I would be VERY, very uncomfortable with it. And I would feel that my rights were being violated.

If someone's religious beliefs or traditions prohibit the person from doing their job duties (pharmacists refusing to dispense the pill), creates an uncomfortable environment (proselytizing at work), or creates a health and safety issue (Sikh construction workers who will not wear a hardhat), then I think that people need to leave their religion at the door.

But in this case, if that guy didn't wear the sticker...what would it hurt? Would he have been unable to do his work? Nope. Was he forbidding the other staff members from wearing the sticker? Nope. Was it creating a health and safety issue? Nope.

I would hope, that in my example, if my boss wanted me to wear a Jesus sticker, that he would respect my discomfort and not force me to wear it if I really didn't want to. And I would REALLY hope that my boss wouldn't go back on his word, and then call my beliefs "ridiculous."

Sylvia - posted on 11/21/2011

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It's bad that the manager went back on his word, and ridiculous that the employee was fired over something like this (that could only happen in a job market as crappy as the current one!) -- you almost have to wonder whether this is the whole story. Maybe he was a problem employee in some other way(s) and this was just the last straw for the manager. Or maybe the manager is a total asshat. If it really was just the sticker incident, it's hard to believe the company wouldn't at least offer some kind of settlement to avoid a wrongful dismissal suit, because really, a STICKER?! What the hell difference could it make to anyone whether he wore the stupid sticker that day or not?

OTOH ... I have to say I think the employee picked the wrong hill to die on. As others have said, there are so many other things he could've done that wouldn't have cost him his job (and good luck finding another one now). Phone in sick that day. Take a vacation day. Wear the sticker upside-down. Put it on his jacket and take the jacket off (or whatever). Take it and "forget" to put it on. And really, if he hadn't made such a big deal about it ahead of time, would anyone even have noticed if he happened to "forget" his sticker that day?

The thing is, although I personally consider this particular fear on the employee's part foolish and absurd, I'm not 100% comfortable saying "just wear the sticker, dude" because in legal terms, it's not necessarily such a big leap from telling this guy "just wear the sticker, dude" to telling a Sikh worker "just take off the turban, dude" or the Orthodox Jewish or Muslim worker "just wear the [immodest clothing item of your choice], lady" or whatever, and this whole area is pretty problematic. If an employer repeatedly requires you to do things or wear things or say things that make you uncomfortable (assuming that your employer is not a criminal organization, in which case you should probably have thought of that before signing on...), that's a hostile work environment, which is not okay. The difference I guess is that someone identifying as Christian is SO FAR from qualifying as a persecuted minority that they almost have to go looking for things to be religiously offended by, which is perhaps what makes the employee's actions in this case, given the number of viable alternatives he presumably had, seem kind of ridiculous.

Still, telling someone "Don't worry, we won't make you", then making him, then firing him because he made a fuss is So Not Cool.

Johnny - posted on 01/02/2012

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Or a public school science teacher refusing to teach evolution.

Or a civic court judge refusing to hear testimony from witnesses who will not swear on the bible.

Neither of these people can keep their jobs if they do not do them properly. We can hold all the beliefs and opinions we choose, we can plan our life so that we follow our ideals, but we can not expect the nature of our jobs to accommodate each one of our specific beliefs. I am opposed to Canada's tar sands and yet my company sells a lot of electrical cable to those places. I would be fired if I refused to do work pertaining to those jobs. And rightfully so.

Sylvia - posted on 11/23/2011

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Frances, if that's the case those businesses are being dicks, and probably breaking the law.



However, the claim that Christians in general constitute some kind of persecuted religious minority in the US is just, excuse me, totally ludicrous. A country where Christmas and Good Friday are national holidays is not a country where Christians are being persecuted. A country where schools can be forced to teach "Creation science" or "Intelligent Design" in biology classes is not a country where Christians are being persecuted. A country where scarelore emails claiming that the President is secretly a Muslim and this is a BAD BAD SCARY THING spread like wildfire, and where people can be elected to high public office not despite, but because of, publicly avowing their belief that the world was created 6000 years ago in 6 days, and where "purity balls" and TheCall and the Promise Keepers are popular social phenomena, is not a country that persecutes Christians. A country where the Christian Right lobby is powerful enough to prevent ratification of the Convention on the Rights of the Child because it might make it easier to prosecute parents for using implements to spank their kids is not a country where Christians are persecuted. (Christian kids, maybe. By their parents. At least if their parents are followers of Michael Pearl.) A country where the very idea of a Jewish Vice-President is either astonishingly cool or astonishingly appalling to virtually the entire population, because every single previous VP and President has been an identifiable Christian of some sort, is not a country that persecutes Christians.



There are countries where Christians are a persecuted minority. If you live in the US, you are not living in one of them.

Becky - posted on 11/21/2011

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Jeannette brings up a good point. What if he had refused to wear the sticker for some reason other than religious beliefs? What if he was an avid environmentalist and felt that his company daily creating however many stickers for their employees to wear was hugely wasteful and environmentally unfriendly and refused to wear the sticker on those grounds? Would the company still have fired him?

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Johnny - posted on 01/03/2012

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I also wish to point out that there is a big difference between a physician choosing not to offer specific services within their private practice and a physician choosing not to perform services within the normal scope of practice in a hospital setting. My GP refers to other practitioners for a whole range of things. He does not provide maternal care for instance. Perhaps due to personal choice or perhaps disinterest (many GP's here do maternity, it's common). As long as he is ensuring that I have access to care, he can make those choices. But I trust that if I absolutely needed him to provide that care under whatever circumstance, he would do so.

Johnny - posted on 01/03/2012

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I agree Laura. This man was not refusing to do his job. I think it was wrong to fire him just for that act. If there were other problems, they should have fired him for those. I have no problem with a doctor chooses to wear obnoxious scrubs in the office, for instance. Since that in no way effects his medical practice.

Johnny - posted on 01/03/2012

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So Joy, you are telling us that you would have absolutely no problem at all if a man refused to pump your gas because he felt that the Quran told him women shouldn't drive and you had to drive around to find another station on a dark rainy night? Or if you had to go stand in another line up in the grocery store because the clerk at the till you chose refuses to check through your meat because her Hindu faith holds cows as sacred? None of those things put a life in danger. Not any more so than a doctor refusing to practice all recognized medical procedures.

If one person can pick and choose which services to offer at their job because of their faith or other personal opinions, so can anyone. That seems a very dangerous path to follow.

Merry - posted on 01/03/2012

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Drs can also refuse to have you as a patient if you refuse to be vaccinated. So it goes all over the workforce.
But this man wasn't refusing to work.

Merry - posted on 01/03/2012

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And yet this sticker did nothing to his job. Wearing it or not he wasn't refusing to work!

Tam - posted on 01/03/2012

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Not necessarily. It's not common in a larger place, but there are some towns that are small and isolated enough that one doctor services the whole settlement, up to and including mortuary services. If such a doctor lets his beliefs hold sway over his responsibilities, then he pretty much has the entire community in his medical power.

User - posted on 01/03/2012

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Sterazation, There are so many Dr.s that do that it is more difficult to find one that won't. "Catholic Hospitals, most of them don't care in the first place about what the Catholic Church teaches, so they do them. Second Point not perscribing BC or doing Sterlations will not put ther life in danger. How DOes their not doing it step on your rights? It does not. If you don't like it, you have a choice of finding another Dr.

Krista - posted on 01/03/2012

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Excellent point, Johnny. I HAVE noticed that the people who support religious opt-out from job tasks, always seem to share the beliefs of the person in question. But I can't help but wonder if Joy would support a Jehovah's Witness doctor who refused to give her sick child a blood transfusion. After all, it's not like the doctor would come across having to do blood transfusions often. Other than that, he's an excellent, competent doctor who has saved a lot of lives. So why should he be penalized just because his faith does not allow him to give a child a blood transfusion after she's experienced a Class III hemorrhage?

Johnny - posted on 01/03/2012

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So Joy, all of your scenarios betray the supporting of a physician who fits into your worldview making choices that you would support.

But lets turn it around for a minute. Imagine that you live in a small isolated community with only one hospital and few doctors. Perhaps they subscribe to a religious worldview that eschews modern painkillers unless the patient could die from the pain. No locals during small procedures, no epidurals or other drugs in childbirth, use of general anesthesia only in circumstances when the patient must be unconscious in order to remain totally still for the procedure. No prescriptions for migraine headaches, nothing after tooth removal, and if you need to have a bone reset, bite on a bullet.

Pain medication that is unnecessary to sustain life and therefore goes against their morals to prescribe it. Their faith holds that that our pain is a message we should listen to.

As someone who lives there, you would have the choice to move, to hope you could make it to the next town to find a doctor who would help, or just muddle through. Now how does that sound? Under such circumstances, would you still feel that people should be able to not follow all the tenets of their job because of their personal beliefs?


How about if you were refused service at a gas station because the Saudi Arabian owner didn't believe women should drive cars? You could always hope to make it down the road to the next station before you run out of gas...


How about if the checkout girl at the supermarket refused to check through your beef because she was a Hindu? You could always go wait in line at another til....


It is easy to agree that people should be able to pick and choose whether they follow the rules of their profession and their work place when they share your values and beliefs. It is a lot harder to stomach when the person is making choices that inconvenience you, put you at risk, or cause you difficulty and you do not agree with those beliefs. If it is okay for a doctor to refuse to prescribe a birth control pill, it is okay for a gas attendant to refuse to pump your gas.

Krista - posted on 01/03/2012

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Each pregnancy is different, and each situation is different. SO many Dr's have said people would die from one thing or another, Does not make it true. Even if a woman wants to be sterilized, that in itself is not a life threating thing.

I'll give you an example, then, Joy.

My MIL had an extremely dangerous pregnancy when carrying my husband. The two of them almost died. It was really damn close.

Afterwards, once everything was healed and fine and she went for a checkup, her doctor said to her, "No more children. You were lucky this time. You may not be lucky again the next time." So she got her tubes tied.

But YOUR oh-so-wonderful doctor, under this scenario, would have refused to do that, leaving my MIL at risk for another pregnancy -- one that very well may have ended her life.

You might think he's great and wonderful. I think he needs to step down from his job if he can't provide appropriate medical care for his patients because of his religious beliefs.

User - posted on 01/03/2012

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Each pregnancy is different, and each situation is different. SO many Dr's have said people would die from one thing or another, Does not make it true. Even if a woman wants to be sterilized, that in itself is not a life threating thing. In a panic it is never a good time to do it. Save the mother's and bab's life first. ANd FYI Most people go to this dr because in fact he does not do BC or Starizations, THat is why I go to him too. :)

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The problem is Joy, if the facility is a Catholic facility (as if very common) and they're the only medical facility within even unreasonable distance (again, very common) should that patient be required to tolerate the religious biases of their doctor? This is why we do push to keep secular organizations and facilities around so that religious institutions can't monopolize medical care.

Yes, if a doctor can't treat his patients for all medical conditions for which he's qualified, he should not bother.

Krista - posted on 01/03/2012

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What about his medical ethics, Joy? What if a woman had had an extremely life-threatening pregnancy, and needed to be sterilized in order to never have her life at risk like that again? Would that doctor have refused to sterilize her? If so, then no, he should not be a doctor, because he is putting his own religious beliefs ahead of his patients' well-being.

User - posted on 01/03/2012

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Most of the time there are more than one person working behind the desk, and nurses do not work alone for the most part. People can still do there jobs well, and not do things that they feel are wrong, as long as they are upfront with their employer. No Problem. FYI my OBGYN Went through medical school, and did rounds at several hospitals and never did one sterazation. He Is a Wonderful Dr. and has saved many women and Children. Should he not be aloud to be a Dr. ?

Tracey - posted on 01/03/2012

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If I go to a company, pharmacist, hospital or anywhere for service I expect them to give me good service. I don't care if the worker is black, white, gay, straight, christian, muslim, belongs to the church of the spaghetti monster, I want the service advertised and I'm not going to waste my time thinking can I get service here or is it against someone's beliefs?
If I need medical treatment or medication I want it then & there and I don't care what the worker believes. If your job description offends your beliefs change your job.

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Joy, are you just as ok with a Christian Scientist refusing to dispense any medication as a pharmacist?: Or perhaps something not as extreme. How about a pharmacist who refuses to dispense antibiotics? Does he have to say it's a religious belief or just because he doesn't feel like it? Which position should be offered respect? I say, neither.

Krista - posted on 01/02/2012

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Actually no. My example was not poor. The pill is an EXTREMELY commonly prescribed medication. This is not some rare medication that a pharmacist may only encounter once or twice in his or her career. Almost 11 million American women use the pill.

So perhaps my butcher example was flawed. I'll give you that. But my pharmacist example was not. Dispensing the pill is something that the average pharmacist would probably do at least once a day. It's a common task of their job. And they know that going in. So to my mind, if they have an objection with the dispensing of a legal, EXTREMELY common medication, then they have no business becoming a pharmacist.

To change my butcher example, I can say that it would be like a vegetarian waitress who refuses to serve meat dishes. Sure, there are plenty of other dishes there besides meat. She can serve pasta or salads, or veggie dishes. But if she is refusing to serve meat dishes, because of her morals, then she is not doing her job as a waitress and should be fired. And if a pharmacist is not doing his job as a pharmacist, then she should be fired.

The worker in the OP should not be fired, as the sticker in question had absolutely no bearing upon his ability to do his job.

And you ARE right in that, "No one should be forced to do something that is aginst their beliefs." Nobody is forcing them. They always have the option to quit.

Rosie - posted on 01/02/2012

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you could apply the same logic as well for pharmacists and nurses though. abortions take up 3% of planned parenthoods services. it's not like they spend all day everyday doing numerous abortions. just like a pharmacist wouldn't spend all of their time filling abortion pills.

User - posted on 01/02/2012

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But they are the largest provider of abortions, and are on a national level, known widely for that. There are tons of wonderful Clinics that do the same thing, but do not provide abortions, but that was off the subject of the debate. My point for talking about Planed Parenthood, was that if you are aginst Abortion, of other things, then why would you chose to work there.

Rosie - posted on 01/02/2012

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no it wouldn't. why do people presume planned parenthood only does abortions?. i've been to planned parenthood probably over 20 times and never had an abortion...

User - posted on 01/02/2012

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No totaly different, "So Joy, you would have no problem with a vegetarian becoming a butcher but refusing to actually butcher meat" A butcher only deals with meat, now if a Nurse or Dr. Or anyone else worked at say Planed Parenthood, that would be the same as a vegetarian becoming a butcher. A nurse can show her value and worth by doing other things besides helping in things that are aginst her beliefs. A pharmacist Fill other RX's Besides birthcontrol. So you in fact have stated a very poor example. O also, Slavery was legal too, so were people wrong for helping slaves escape to freedom?

Krista - posted on 01/01/2012

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No one should be forced to do something that is aginst their beliefs. Be it a nurse who is pro life and is asked to help with an abortion, or a pharmacists refusing to dispense the pill. They have that right to not be any part of something that is moraly wrong.

So Joy, you would have no problem with a vegetarian becoming a butcher but refusing to actually butcher meat?

In the OP's situation, I think the company was being silly. The sticker has absolutely no bearing on the employee's ability to do his job, so they should have just let it go.

But the examples you use are VERY different. In the pharmacist example...the pill is legal. It has been legal for over 40 years. With the exception of those pharmacists who are very close to retirement age, virtually EVERY pharmacist has gone to pharmacy school with the full awareness that the pill is legal. This wasn't sprung on them suddenly. Dispensing legal, prescribed medications is their JOB. And if they refuse to dispense a legal, prescribed medication, then they are not doing their job, and should undergo disciplinary action by their licensing board.

I'm all for religious freedom. But I have no patience for people who deliberately choose a career that WILL conflict with their religious beliefs. If you're that frigging pro-life, then pick a job that never forces you into those ethical situations.

Merry - posted on 01/01/2012

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Correction, the company is ridiculous. The man is NOT ridiculous.
Yeah I might have just called in to work but he assumed his boss would be reasonable.
No I wouldn't wear a 666 sticker.

Merry - posted on 01/01/2012

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That's ridiculous! I haven't read the comments, but honestly' I'm not too supersticious or anything but I do think I'd be uncomfortable wearing a 666 sticker. I think I'd simply take it and throw it away.

User - posted on 12/31/2011

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Religous Freedom is that freedom. No one should be forced to do something that is aginst their beliefs. Be it a nurse who is pro life and is asked to help with an abortion, or a pharmacists refusing to dispense the pill. They have that right to not be any part of something that is moraly wrong.

Keeshia - posted on 12/29/2011

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I'm christian and joke about my sister being the devil (her 3 names are 6 letters each) but I'd still never actually wear the number. a sticker probably wont damn me to hell or anything but it would make me very uncomfortable for religious reasons. Due to his religious beliefs the company should not have fired him since the offense did not interfere negatively with his work.

Dusty - posted on 12/26/2011

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Honestly, I hate to see this happening. When you live in the United States, you have the right to freedom of religion, & to express that religion however you please. Being fired for not wearing a sticker is ridiculous, & the company was in the wrong. I do think the employee could have just called in sick, but such is life. Shame on the company for trying to take away his freedom of religion!

Jeannette - posted on 11/28/2011

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Laura, in Texas there is a clause that allows workers to quit with no reason and companies to fire for no reason. So, if a problem employee were to get fired in Texas, as long as the employer did not give a reason, it is perfectly legal. Now, if a company does give a reason, now the employee has information to fight against.

Jodi - posted on 11/28/2011

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Jeannette - I don't know the details of the case. There could be much more to his work history than just refusing to wear a sticker. Maybe he made a lot of mistakes. Maybe he always refuses orders and this was the last straw. If it was really his only incident, I don't think it was right to fire him. But, without hearing the whole story, we shouldn't judge. There's always two sides to every story, and the truth usually lies in the middle.

Jeannette - posted on 11/28/2011

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Jodi, the man chose the 3 day suspension he was offered, should he have been fired as well?

Jodi - posted on 11/28/2011

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I have a lawyer's perspective on this issue. Although I do not do employment law, I have an understanding of the issue from the many cases I read about the First Amendment in law school. Basically, as long as the rule at work does not specifically target religion and, instead, applies to everyone equally, then the rule passes First Amendment muster. The rule was for everyone to wear the sticker, and this worker refused a direct order. If the boss let him get away with it, it may have led to more insubordination, and he was disciplined for it. I agree with some that say there must be more to the story (maybe there was a history of failure to obey rules, maybe his work was lacking, etc.). But, because everyone was required to wear this sticker, he must either follow the rules, or follow his religious beliefs and suffer the consequences. If only devote Christians were chosen to wear "666", then there would be a problem. Because there wasn't, he had a choice to make. He made it. No discrimination.

Johnny - posted on 11/26/2011

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That's true Emma. But harassing people is a good excuse to fire someone. I guess it will all come out in the lawsuit. Until then, it's all pure speculation anyway.

Johnny - posted on 11/26/2011

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Cathy, have you considered that he may not be a drunk lazy assohole but a sanctimonious religious nut who irritates the crap out of everyone so they would jump onto any excuse to fire him? It doesn't sound like this guy is a prince, but work place regulations have been designed to protect us all and we should be opposed to their breach. I rather suspect that if he was a lazy drunk they could have found easier, more legitimate excuses to fire him long before day 666. I'm not saying I like him or I'm defending him, he frankly sounds like an irritating prick, but you can't fire someone for that.

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Cathy... you're taking the word of an unknown commenter as truth. ;)

Since their IS no other side being presented at the moment.... we can really only form opinions based on the information we have. IF we can read another side... those opinions may change.

Rosie - posted on 11/26/2011

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whoops i did read that wrong, lol. i read a few times too...my mind is going.

Becky - posted on 11/25/2011

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It only says he was fired for refusing to work on Day 666, not for refusing to come back after his suspension. And he didn't technically refuse to work, he just refused to wear the sticker and was told wear it or go home for 3 days.

Lacye - posted on 11/25/2011

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Hyatt took the three-day suspension, and was fired at a human resources meeting several days later





The article said he was put on a 3 day suspension and was fired a few days after he came back. It never said he didn't come back at all.

Rosie - posted on 11/25/2011

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that article totally said why he was fired-he refused to come into work after his suspension. well, in my book, you don't go to work when you are scheduled you should get fired, ESPECIALLY right after a suspension. it happens sooooooo much where i work and it irritates the hell out of me.

Lacye - posted on 11/25/2011

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It still doesn't say why he was fired but it appears that there are more reasons as the the why. However, if he was fired over not wearing the sticker, then the employer would be in the wrong.

Johnny - posted on 11/23/2011

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Jen, I totally agree that no matter why he is afraid of the number, it's still silly and ridiculous to be worried about a number. The whole concept of the "mark of the beast" is entirely laughable in my opinion. However, it is only my opinion and I certainly do not have the right (nor does his employer) to fire him because he has stupid personal ideas. If he did his job and upheld the safety regulations that were the reason for this idiotic sticker in the first place, he was fired without just cause. People have silly superstitions and ideas, religious or not at all, every day.

Isobel - posted on 11/23/2011

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I haven't read everything yet but I know my ex was a problem employee for years and had many verbal warnings and write ups. When he was suspended for a "trivial" (how trivial I will never really know because he was full of horse shit) matter after taking parental leave, he saw a lawyer and tried to sue them for firing him because he took parental leave.



I always think of that when I see people being fired for really silly little reasons. You can't just fire somebody legally for a sticker, if it were truly the real problem, he would've been given a verbal warning, then another, then another, then a written, and another one of those etc.



I doubt the firing was about a sticker.

Amie - posted on 11/23/2011

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Knowing people who are very devout, growing up with a grandmother who was her entire life - so long before I knew her - it's not all that strange to me. I'm not particularly close to said people because I just can't wrap my head around believing that strongly but to them it's very real.

That being said, those other options have also been stated as to why they would not work. He went to his manager, by his account, ahead of time. He was told they would figure it out. He was then suspended. He was then fired for not working that day. In essence, being punished twice for the same thing.

That is going by the story put forth, I also stated previously in this thread we won't know everything, we probably never will. In every story there are always bits we won't know.

I also never said Christians were a minority. I left that out specifically because it's obvious they are not a minority but they are treated badly. Most religions are, generally by each other. It's religion, it's an easy punching bag.

Sylvia - posted on 11/23/2011

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Sure, there are jerks everywhere, and some of them are jerks who engage in religion-based harrassment. Harrassment is bad. Discrimination is bad. That still doesn't make Christians a persecuted minority in the US (for one thing, Christians are the overwhelming majority of people who identify with a religion -- plus, all those "illegal" immigrants from Mexico that people are always complaining about? They're not Jewish or Muslim, folks...).

People shouldn't be jerks. I think we all agree on that point. Most of us also agree that the manager in this case, if the facts are as reported, was a jerk and that the company's HR department totally fell down on the job. However, most of us also feel that the employee likely had other options than making a big fuss, and that this was a peculiar hill to choose to die on.

And I think a lot of us think there must be more to this story ...

Amie - posted on 11/23/2011

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To be persecuted means to be oppressed OR harrassed.



I'd say Christians are harrassed plenty. (Hell, most religions can fall under this because people are jack asses.) Even amongst this thread you can see it. So, for me, it's not a far leap to make that his bosses did indeed use this as a firing measure. It might have been a hot headed thing to do but they are humans, they are fallible. They wouldn't be the first to make a serious error because they believed something or someone to be stupid.

Lacye - posted on 11/23/2011

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Christianity may be one of the biggest religions in this country but that still does not mean it is not discriminated against. Maybe the sticker wasn't the only reason why he was fired, but it still does not make it right that that is the reason why they decided at that moment to fire him. To you it's a silly superstition, but to him it's very real and he has been discriminated against based on the Fair Labor Standards Act.

Sal - posted on 11/23/2011

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Both sides are silly if he was fired for this it is stupid to make such a fus is stupid ...put It on upside down it's then 999 prob slOved .... Like someone else said it doesnt seem like the real reason the company would know that it wouldn't stand up in court so I think there is more to it

Becky - posted on 11/23/2011

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" I'm still not convinced that he was fired solely for this reason. But let's even suppose that it is. I see no reason we should coddle superstitious nonsense in the workplace. Jeez, you name any superstition and put the words, "it's my religious belief" and you apparently can get away with anything."

But Jen, what if his reason for refusing to wear the sticker had not been religious? What if, like I asked before, it had been because he objected to the waste involved in manufacturing new stickers every day? Would you still feel that his firing was justifiable?

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