Cost of Living. What is it where you live?

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 02/21/2012 ( 117 moms have responded )

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Ok not really a debate, but it started from the Carpeting or wood floors post from Laura♥♥♥ and just evolved. So I'm wondering what is the cost of living where you are. Or even where you're from. Groceries, housing/rent. Even gas.



I live in the Central Okanagan region of BC. I don't know about housing costs here, but my rent is 910$ a month and that's considered cheap in the city I live in.



Right now I pay 1.22,9 a liter for gas. It was 1.18.4 a few weeks ago. Milk is 4.67 for 4liters up from 4.53 a few weeks ago. But Canadians pay some of the highest dairy prices in the world.

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Jodi - posted on 03/07/2012

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Minimum wage in Australia is $15.51 per hour (or $19.39 if you are casual).. That's what I meant when I said about expenses being relative. An Aussie might say *oh, my, we are worse off than you because we pay THIS for our fuel, blah, blah*, but you also have to take our incomes into account.

Jodi - posted on 03/03/2012

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Ah, but Megan, think of what you are saving on health insurance :) It's all relative.

Jodi - posted on 03/08/2012

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I thought this was interesting. As I said, compare apples with apples......Sydney might be one of the most expensive in the world, but it is also the richest because average incomes make it affordable. I hardly think Melbourne is less affordable than Sydney.



http://www.citymayors.com/economics/usb-...

Deborah - posted on 03/08/2012

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I'm located in the mountains of North Carolina, US The main employers here are a university and a hospital - making wages depressed comparatively (no competition). We are often told part of the compensation package is the beauty around us! But on to the numbers... Minimum wage is $7.50 I think. We build our house in 2007 for $200,000 and are paying $1200/mo for mortgage, escrow, + insurance. Housing here is very polar - it's either a trailor home in a trailor park for $50k-$200k, or it's a 2500sqft home for $500k. Anything in the middle is a rental and no longer for sale. Rentals run between $400 for a 3bed/1bath trailor and $1800 for a 3 bed 2 bath house.



Electric just went up again so I'm not sure what it is, but our monthly bill was averaging $125/mo (and only that because we tollerate colder winters and hotter summers than average). My good freind's electric is $350/mo around the corner...



Organic milk is $7/ gallon and I think regular milk is $3.50/gallon. We are transitioning to organic everything we can find so we used to pay about $200/week for food, but I expect that to be a thing of the past for us.



Gas is $3.80-ish/gal right now. But being in the mountians, you MUST drive whereever you need to go and even with efficient vehicles, you go through at least a tank a week. There is no public transit option and to walk to school would be over an hour for the 5-6 miles - and I know lots of families that drive 20 minutes to get to the closest school.



Insurance is $800-ish/yr for the house and $1000 annual for 2 cars w 2 drivers. I was thinking that was rediculous, but I will no longer complain... Oh, and while my job pays for MY insurance, my kids insurance costs me another $300/mo for the lowest level insurance I can get.



Can't tell you what TV or land lines cost as we cancelled those years ago. Cable is not available in my area, so our only option would only be satalite. But DSL is $20/mo for the laughablely slow rates we can get and our cell bill for 2 lines (no data) is $110/mo.



My youngest is 7, but I remember paying $675 for childcare centers and $400 for in home daycares. And that was CHEAP compared to the next town over where it's $900 for a 3-5 year old...



I'm glad I ran accross this post. We struggle to make ends meet each month, but I can see that it's all perspective. While we pay less on some things and more on others - looks like we are all in the same boat. Pay check to pay check to get the important things.

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 03/07/2012

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It is appalling. Not every province in Canada has the same base rate but my goodness $7.25 and $7.50 is ridiculous... I wouldn't be able to eat at all, it would all have to go to my kids.... I would be a walking stick, rambling to myself from going BONKERS!



I stand corrected as well. Minimum wage is $10/hour in NS as of this past October but is going up to $10.15/hour as of this April 1st... They were fighting for $10.50 which must have confused me... LOL



Currently Nunavut is the highest at $11/hour



Megan -

BC is going up to $10.25/hour as of this May 1st. Not bad.. ;)

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Candice - posted on 03/06/2013

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I live in a University town. Im from Fredericton, NewBrunswick(Canada) and rent can be high for something decent. We currently pay 740 for a 3 bedroom 2 bath (non updated apartment) However in 3 weeks i am moving to a PMQ(personal military quarters) my husband is in the CF. So rent is $590, electricity is about $100, Natural gas is at a high $300 for these houses and water and sewer is $110 ever 3 months. We also pay $110 for internet and full cable package. our insurance is 170 a month with no accidents on our recorder tickets at all. our gas runs about 1.30L lower than the rest of the province due to our Cost-co gas bar which drives the prices lower. Milk is 3.29for 2L and bread on a normal day is 3.99. Better than some places for sure but still high for basic necessities like milk and bread.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 03/20/2012

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Lisa, yikes. My parents live in Monroe county in upstate NY they make about 70K a year and they live in one of the cheaper towns that you can live in and still be in the suburbs.

Lisa - posted on 03/20/2012

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I recently read an interesting blurb in my local paper. It wasn't about what is the poverty level, it talked about a sustainability level. I live in Chester county, PA, which is suburban Philadelphia.



The paper said that a sustainability level it basically what it takes for your average family--2 parents, one kiddo, to live comfortably. Not fancy, not extravagant, but not struggling either. In my county, they said that the family household income would need to be almost $80k a year to reach that comfortable sustainability level.

Beth - posted on 03/13/2012

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We live in San Francisco. We rent a small-ish 2 bedroom house for $2400 a month, which is a smokin' deal for what we got (single family home, use of garage, backyard, laundry facilities). We were paying more than that for an extremely small 1 bedroom before, street parking, no backyard, it just depends on what neighborhood you're in. To buy a house will cost you at least $500,000, probably more in the area of $700,000 to $1,000,000. Gas right now is hovering in the $4/gallon range, but it varies a lot across the city. I don't really know what milk is, I don't buy a lot of it anymore. I'm thinking probably $3.99 a gallon on average, more if you want organic. A dozen eggs is at least $2.99. I remember in the midwest being able to get eggs for $0.89! Generally I spend about $150 a week to feed me, my husband and our 3 year old son.

Kimberly - posted on 03/12/2012

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There is no way to compare the cost of living to US to Australia, I'm from Canada and I remember bartending and making $6 an hour, I lived in Alberta and didnt have to pay health insurance cause I was under the poverty level for income lol!!!!! I make three times as much money doing the same job here as back in Canada but do pay alot more for things but I wont trade my life here, love being able to walk to the beach

Shaz - posted on 03/11/2012

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Jodi is right when she says comparing the U.S to Australia is different and it is all relative.

the min wage in aus for an adult is $15 an hr....

I live in perth.

the cheapest house to buy here was $230K but it was severely dilapidated. The actual AVERAGE cost of a house here is about $350K - $450K depending on suburb.

Most people here have houses. Most units and apartments are state housing although some off the more swish ones are not. But a one bedroom flat in or near the city will set you back by around $260K

State housing has a 9 yr waiting list, priority housing waiting list is 4yrs.

I have a modest 3 bed 1 bath house on 776 m2 block in a reasonable suburb in the 'hills' my morgage we paid $335K

our weekly morgage payment is $560 per week for 30 yrs.

internet (for uni) costs me $88 a month

Mobile phone is $59 for a $650 cap.

Elec- every 2 months is about $260

Gas through bill smoothing is $54 a month

water (im a bit careful) - every 6 mths is about $120

Land rates $1300 a year

Water rates $800 a year

Car insurance - varies i pay $75 month

House insurace $80 month

Medicare - mostly free health care ( to see a doctor if you dont have a health care card or pension card out of pocket expense is about $30 unless you need a report (for uni) then medicare doesnt cover)

Schools- publics schools are kind of free...... for 5 yr old kindy $50 "contribution but if you dont pay she cant do incursions/excursions or swimming lessons at school.

Same goes for Primary and high school. but the cost is higher and they wont release report cards and they can hold back results which means in high school you wont graduate.....

Petrol is $1.49 a litre. Milk if you know where to go is $1.75 for 2 ltrs. (the most ive seen milk cost for 2 ltrs is $4.50) Apples are (if you go to coles or woolies) between $4 - 6 a kilo. bananas have got cheeper at $2 kg. Meat is expensive cheap crap mince will set you back $6 - $7 for a kilo. most steak no matter the type or quality is around or near $18 a kilo.... although rump, sirloin, fillet and tbones are frquently $24 Kg. Food staples can be expensive too.....

My Food bill a fortnight is about $200 but i skimp and my fridge looks empty by the second week....

Lisa - posted on 03/10/2012

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Rent; $1500 for a two bdrm, 1 ba., groceries; $400+, utilities; (cable, electric, gas water) $300, fuel/transportation; $100 - I live in Los Angeles, nothing fancy, really basic housing, used car, no spending on clothes, going out, no healthcare. Did I mention I am LEAVING Los Angeles? Cost of living not in balance with the rate of income to support living here!

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 03/08/2012

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LOL Jodi I got out of being in debt for having my babies twice! The first one I was on Tri Care which is US military insurance (paid for by tax dollars so it's kind of like socialized medicine and I got to choose a doctor as long as he or she accepted my insurance) the second one I was on state insurance. No bill!



My brother and our parents have employer provided insurance- my brother's is probably the best. I haven't heard horror stories yet and my SIL just had their baby back in August. He had to go to NICU shortly after because the cord was wrapped around his neck twice. I believe his insurance covered most of it with a small co pay



One thing I will kvetch about is the cost of auto insurance in BC. We just have ICBC (I have to ask first because CIBC is a bank and I get the letters mixed up) which is a government insurance company for auto insurance. Back in New York I had a choice of insurance companies. My brother is only paying 42$ a month for the same coverage my husband pays 84$ a month for! And they are the same age and married! And Lee (my husband) has never even been in an accident or received a traffic ticket unlike my brother! ICBC is talking about raising rates too. And they can do it because there isn't competition here in BC. FML

Jodi - posted on 03/08/2012

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Tell Damo he's nuts. Christ, we're twice your age (well almost) and we don't think we need it!!!

Stifler's - posted on 03/08/2012

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damo insists we need it it's ridiculous even mbf have been telling us for years that we're wasting money and that's saying something

Jodi - posted on 03/08/2012

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Yeah, I removed hip replacement too. I figured I can always add it when I get older :P

Stifler's - posted on 03/08/2012

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I'm going to cut it down to your choice extras. the dental has been worth it and chiropractic and pharmacy you get 50 % back but i never used the maternity or hip replacements or any of that and neither did damo. he just got glasses. so i'd choose those 4 and basic hospital. i was looking at cutting it down the other day.

Jodi - posted on 03/08/2012

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Emma, you probably pay for extras. I don't bother with that, I self insure on that stuff. It isn't worth the paper it's written on (We got $400 back on a $1500 dental plate, so they can stick their insurance, I'd rather save the $150 a month in our savings account). Also I removed maternity from our insurance. That makes a HUGE difference.

Jodi - posted on 03/08/2012

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I think the point I was trying to make is that you even have to PAY $1000 a month in health insurance. I have private insurance where I live (in addition to free health care) and my entire family is covered for a mere $150 a month, and I can choose whatever doc I want too. I was just saying it is all relative. $12,000 a year in health cover versus $1800 a year is a cost of living issue. So people can say, oh, but things cost so much more in Australia, but when you start taking all those other factors into consideration, it simply isn't true, because it comes down to overall affordability.

Jenn - posted on 03/08/2012

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That is ridiculous. I had maternity insurance for my first baby and paid $500 total. Second baby I didn't have maternity insurance and a c-section was $9500 out of pocket.



We do pay $1000/mo for me and two kids..hubby is covered by his employer. But I can go to whatever doc I want, when I need to, no restrictions or government roadblocks. My mother in law gets all her medical via the Veteran Affairs. If socialized medicine is anything like her government care...no thank you!! Granted she never pays boo for any medical care but GETTING her the right care requires so much red tape and waiting that she often bails on the care altogether!



There are pros and cons to everything in life. And it is all relative for sure. I am just waiting for that one brilliant idea to pop in my head and make a cool billion off of it ;)

Jodi - posted on 03/08/2012

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"•Income and Taxation

•Housing and Accommodation

•Utilities

•Transportation

•Education

•Health Care

•Interest Rates"



Exactly Megan, there are so many things to consider, I don't think we can really make accurate comparisons. After all, our incomes are higher, but our tax is higher. However, we have child care subsidies, family assistance payments, free healthcare, free education, and so on. So when you balance it all up, I still think we Aussies are on a pretty good wicket.



For instance, I know people in the US who have to pay $1000 a month for health insurance. Are you kidding me? On an average wage of WHAT? AND they still have to co-pay. I've never heard of ANYONE in Australia being in debt because they had a baby. Imagine being insured and still having a $20,000 bill for having a baby. Shit, even if you were uninsured here and went private you wouldn't pay that much. That's just ridiculous.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 03/08/2012

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Going with Jodi's theme I tried to find a few websites as well.



The first one makes me chuckle because McDonald's is the only place more expensive in Kelowna than in Vancouver. I just don't know why it's in Euros



http://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/com...



The second website is kind of depressing



http://www.kelowna.com/tag/cost-of-livin...



Welcome to BC's website has this to say:



Cost of living

Moving to another country can be expensive—and you may be surprised to pay much more (or less) for some items than you did in your home country.



Did you know that the cost of living varies depending on where you live? Victoria and the communities in Metropolitan Vancouver (including Vancouver, Richmond and North Vancouver) are among the most popular places in British Columbia to live. As a result, housing costs are higher here than in other cities or towns in B.C. You may find that you could enjoy a higher standard of living by settling in one of the less populated regions of the province.



The Institute of Chartered Accountants of B.C.(ICABC) publishes an annual report called B.C.Check-Up that could help you to calculate the cost of living anywhere in B.C.



If you are trying to calculate the cost of living in B.C., here are some things to consider:



•Income and Taxation

•Housing and Accommodation

•Utilities

•Transportation

•Education

•Health Care

•Interest Rates

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 03/08/2012

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Damn Johnny 6$ ! DH said he's never worked at a company that did that, but he has heard of that. The lowest he was paid was 8.50 an hour when he worked at a pub as a dish washer back in 2008. The most he made was 15$ an hour doing Seizmic (which I can't spell)



I started out as a care aide at 7.50 an hour back in 2006, but I made a lot of over time. When I worked per diem at an assisted living community I made between 11.25-13.25 an hour depending on the shift and when it was. My brother makes about 18$ an hour working for Frito Lay full time. Our dad makes about 17$ an hour working full time at Wegmans as a department head and he's been working there longer than my brother and I have been alive! Back in 2008 when our gas in NY went over 4$ a gallon I went into assisted living and made 9.50$ an hour.



Right now in BC health care workers who work in government run hospitals and nursing homes haven't received a raise in 4 years, but they do make a little more than people who work in privately run ones. However given what my MIL has said about what's going on in the government run facilities (and she knows because she's a CNA at the one her mom is living in), I'm going to go for somewhere private.



Deborah, people in my part of BC sometimes joke that the reason our cost of living is so high is the Sunshine tax- we have better weather than other parts of the province.

Samantha - posted on 03/07/2012

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hahah i live in alaska we pay $4.11 for gas, rent is around what you said and we pay $4.59 a gallon for local milk....think its the cost of being north lol

Nicole - posted on 03/07/2012

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But you also have to take into account Aussie housing prices which are astronomical! Apparently, according to the news, it is now more expensive to live in Melbourne than it is in new York (this is taking into account the average incomes).

Johnny - posted on 03/07/2012

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Until mid way through last year, the minimum wage here in BC was $8/hr. Given that of the provinces (not including the territories) we have the highest cost of living, no "pro-business groups" could continue to defend it successfully. We also have a lovely thing called the training wage which allowed companies to pay new employees $6/hr. Which given that the average rent in urban areas for a studio apartment is $850/month, is nothing short of cruel.

Jenn - posted on 03/07/2012

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$7.25 is the minimum wage in Texas which is also the federal rate. A few states have higher than the federal rate and, appallingly, some have lower than federal rate. Either way, anything under $10/hr is ridiculous and shameful for our country! The labor laws are vague and open to interpretation by employers.



Cost of living differences within the US always shock me. I have no idea how people can earn minimum wage and function in some cities!

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 03/07/2012

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7.50$ is the standard US minimum wage. However when I was living in TX and tried to get a job there someone laughed at me when I said I made that much back in New York.



We've tried to get a working wage here in the US, but the wonderful GOP tells us 'no'

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 03/07/2012

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My goodness that is retarded expensive and very low low minimum wage!!

Alana - posted on 03/07/2012

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Yes $7.50 and hour - how sad is that! We own our house, (well the bank owns half - lol) but to rent it would be at least $32,000 a year plus utlilities. The $12,000 is what we pay in taxes alone! We know many people who have left and moved to other states, for a better quality of life.

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 03/07/2012

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Wow, Alana $7.50/hour???? That is INSANE! You can't live off of that anywhere IMO. In NS it is $10.50/hour and people barely scrape by on that.... Mind you for a house the size you just said, it would be more like $24 000/year to rent, plus utilities. That is without property tax, add another $3000/year for that.

Alana - posted on 03/07/2012

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So interesting to see the various price points out there. I live in Long Island, New York. Gas right now is $4.05 a gallon, milk is $4.57 a gallon, and bread $3.89 (goes on sale for $2.50 often). Car insurance is about $185 a month for 2 cars, even with one being 8 years old. What is the killer is the property and school taxes. For our 1,800 sq ft house with 4 bedrooms/2 baths on about a 1/4 acre is $12,000 a year. Can you believe minimum wage is $7.50 an hour? How someone could possibly live off that is beyond me.

Hannah - posted on 03/05/2012

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I live in Exeter, United Kingdom and we pay £700 ($1110.48) a month for rent which is average for a three bedroom terrace in our area. Petrol / gas is really expensive in the UK at £1.38 a litre ($2.19) and the cost of a weekly shop for a family of 4 is around $154 to $190 or £100 to £120.

Becky - posted on 03/04/2012

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Housing is expensive here in Calgary. Our 3 bedroom, 3 1/2 bath 2300 sq. foot house on a 1/3 acre lot cost us $565,000.00. I think right now, gas is about $1.12 a litre. Milk is about $4.75, I think. I only like French or sourdough bread, which is usually $2.99 a loaf, but I always buy it on sale at a buck or a buck 99. Cost of living is pretty high in Calgary, but we're an oil city, so we have some pretty high salaries here too. Of course, not everyone is rich! (We're not! But we do ok) We have fairly high homeless rates thanks to the boom a few years back. Tons of people moved to Calgary from out East because there were tons of jobs here, but housing prices went through the roof and rental rates were pretty much 0, so a lot of them ended up on the streets. It's gotten better, but I think our housing prices are still among the highest in Canada. (Only TO and Vancouver are higher, I think.)

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 03/04/2012

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our gas is now $1.38/litre... They have estimated it will be $2/litre by next summer (2013).... FM I need a horse! We have lots of grass... LOL

Pam - posted on 03/04/2012

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Ottawa, On...CA. 1250/month 3bdrm townhouse, gas 1,25ltre, I buy my bread from coscos :) 12 grain 3 loafs $5, $4 milk, $100 car insurance, min wage here is $10.25, and maple syrup is about 10 bucks for a 500 ml.

Brittney - posted on 03/04/2012

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Iowa: Gas is $3.49/gal, Milk is $4.04, our mortgage is $364.72/mo for a 2 bed 1 bath, no garage in a great neighborhood, chips are $4.99/10 1/2 oz, similac formula is $25.00(avg) 1 pound powder.

Kari - posted on 03/04/2012

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I am in the southern area of Michigan. In USD gas is $4/gallon, Milk is 2.99/gallon, apt complexes range from 350-900 a mo. for 1-4 bedrooms. Houses around here are fairly cheap since most of them are forclosed. The bad thing there are jobs mostly in factory positions.

Child care is 200/week, and groceries range from cheap to expensive depending on where you shop, save a lot, walmart, meijers, and horrocks for freash veggies and fruit.

Stifler's - posted on 03/04/2012

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It's not so much food etc. than takes away all our money but insurances. Life, health, car, car payments.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 03/03/2012

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Johnny, But what do you expect me to do for entertainment since I can't afford to get the entertainment package with The Comedy Channel? Oh BTW, Shaw's Time Change package includes my hometown Fox station :D Yeah that was random.



Part of what I like about living in my area of Kelowna. I can walk my older daughter to her school, we can walk to the grocery store and the bank as well. We really only worry about the cost of gas when we have to go to my MIL's or to DH's dad's family in Vernon.



LOL Jodi I'll remember that when I finally get my care card from BC health. Hopefully they spell my last name right because my baby is missing the 'g' in her last name. It's still valid though according to BC Health.

Johnny - posted on 03/03/2012

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I think my main issue is that at least here (and I'm sure elsewhere too), the average take home pay after taxes and other deductions is actually going down, while the cost of living has been going up significantly. Locally, our housing costs are skyrocketing, and the only things that saves most low to low middle income people from homelessness is the fact that we have controls on how much you can increase rents year over year on current tenants. Food costs have been rising, although not shockingly. Fuel costs have really gone up in the past 5 years though. Nothing like in the UK, but we generally need to travel further by car in our non-urban areas and have worse public transit options across the board. Over the past 30 years, the standard of living for working families here has dropped significantly. We are expected to work far more hours, far longer, and for far less factoring in inflation than our parent's generation.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 03/03/2012

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Jodi, I still get to be shocked by the cost even with moving from NY to BC.



My pay back in NY was 9$ an hour. Minimum wage in BC right now is only about 9.50 an hour. BC is also one of the most expensive places to live in Canada. New York can be expensive depending on where you live. Rochester was relatively affordable say to NYC where a friend of mine lives. She'd kill for my rent where as someone in my MIL's town would beat someone to pay what my brother did for a house. Maybe if I lived in NYC before moving to BC I wouldn't be as stunned at paying 4.59 for 4 liters of milk as opposed to 1.99 a gallon.



My main gripe though is with Canadian TV. I want some more US stations and more access to more stations. Digital cable in Canada doesn't compair with digital in the US

Jodi - posted on 03/03/2012

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I'm in Canberra. But there are areas of Australia where housing is extremely cheap (see example below), just as there are areas of USA where housing is excessively expensive :) We do have a much higher minimum wage and average income, so I don't think they are necessarily better off. Sure, if we went and lived in the US, on the average wages earned here, we would be in heaven with the prices, but the fact is, most people in the US earn nowhere near what we do, AND they don't have the welfare available to us, or a free medical system. Minimum wage is more than half ours, and average income is also quite a lot lower. You need to take ALL of it into consideration, not just a part of it.



http://www.realestate.com.au/property-ho...



And just for the record, I wasn't just referring to you :) I was making a point.

Nicole - posted on 03/03/2012

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Jodi, not sure where you live in Oz but have never heard of houses where anybody would want to live for $90k. We earn similar salaries to what we would in the US so I believe I was comparing apples to apples. Also, I was not "whinging", I believe I was stating simple facts. Hope you are having a great day!

Jodi - posted on 03/03/2012

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I think you have to keep in mind the minimum wage and average income is higher, though. Compare apples with apples when you whine about cost.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 03/03/2012

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Nicole I hear you. I'm an American as well and have only lived in Canada for just over 8 months. My husband (who is Canadian) believes I should be used to the higher prices by now.



Gas is still 1.25 a liter up from 1.18 a few weeks ago. It's nearly the same price through the Okanagan/Shuswap region with the exception of Enderby which is just south of my MIL. I can get gas in Enderby for 1.19 a liter because there is a First nation run gas station and the other 2 gas stations in town have to compete with them.

Nicole - posted on 03/03/2012

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Wow I feel like we're worse off than everybody, in Melbourne Australia. :(:( we pay $3 for 3 litres of generic milk, we pay around $1.50/litre for fuel/petrol, we paid $525k for our 4br/2nd house 4 years ago and our monthly mortgage payment is around $3400. We are in a nice estate about 25 mms from the city. Car insurance is around $75/month per car, we have 2. We pay $24 for a 900 gram tin of formula and .32 per nappie/diaper at Costco...thNk god we at least have Costco now!! I am American but have been in oz for nearly 9 years now and oh how I still miss the US prices and food sometimes!!!

Jenn - posted on 03/03/2012

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I live in TX. We aren't too bad here. Though gas just leapt to $3.59...which sucks. Organic milk is $3.89/gallon. Our rental is 1300 sq feet and mortgage is $860 (paid off in three more years! Woohoo!). Our own home is 4020 sq feet and we pay $1800/mo. We grow a lot of our own veggies or buy local.



The kicker is medical insurance. That really bites but we have no other choice! My husband says we are insurance poor.

Danielle - posted on 03/03/2012

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I'm in the Oklahoma City, OK area. Also staying on the inexpensive end of things. Fiance bought us an older home (1969) for $92k. It's ~1400sf w/3bd, 1.5ba for $675/mo. Plenty of houses around here the same size on smaller lots for $300k, which makes no sense to me. Likewise, same size can rent for $800-$2000/mo depending on where around town you look. They have tiny new condos selling in bricktown/downtown for $250k-$500k.



Gas jumped $0.10/gal today, putting us around $3.60/gal. Milk is $4/gal. I'm paying $70/mo for car insurance but that's w/discount for multi-car, firefighter & home mortgage. It was $90/mo w/o all the discounts even w/me being a safe driver, over 25 & a mom.



$7.50/hr minimum wage here. I've been working 2 jobs for over 4yrs now: full-time as a contractor for feds & part-time as a contractor for state, doing computer work for both so I'm making $22/hr by working 56hrs/wk. No overtime. Anything over 40hrs/wk in the day job has to be taken as comp (gives me time to take kids to appts). Haven't ever worked more than 24hrs/wk at 2nd job. Yep, I was working 64hrs+/wk for quite a bit there. Was happy to cut back to 56hrs/wk, but even that's kicking my butt as I get older. Given I'm having to fight tooth & nail to get financial support for the kids from my ex even tho he makes more than me for 40hrs/wk & lives in the same area (yet he's having to file for bankruptcy cuz his wife is allegedly spending all his money), I figured it would be best to keep at the 2nd job as long as possible.

Carolyn - posted on 03/01/2012

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I live on the lower mainland and you are right it is hard. Daughter lives in Toronto and she said the same thing . Prices go up wages stay the same . Thanks to the government, maybe if we had 2to 5year olds running the country we would be better off can not be any worse.

Sarah - posted on 03/01/2012

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Well, being from California, I feel the need to chime in. I come from one of the most expensive towns in America as far as housing goes... Santa Barbara... Houses go for over $600,000 for only about 1600 sq ft. we paid $1900 a month in rent for a 1400sq ft apt and were happy about that. It was the cheapest complex in town. Milk is no biggie. You can get 2 gallons for $3.50 or so at Costco and gas is hovering around $4.13 right now, which sucks. But we moved from SB down to the Inland Empire (up against the mountains in LA, so no city costs) and you can get a 3,000sq ft home with 5 bedrooms and a yard for about $310,000. So, it is all perspective as far as housing goes. We feel like it is SOOOOOOOOOO cheap down here, but we come from inflated and ridiculously overpriced homes. Santa Barbara was voted #3 in the country about 5 years ago as having overvalued homes... and it's neighboring community of Goleta was #6. It is all about perspective. If you are used to paying a lot for everything, then when you move everything is so darn cheap... but the people here feel it since they see the increase whereas we see the amazing cut in costs.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 02/25/2012

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Our gas went up to 1.28 a liter down in Kelowna. I'm at my MIL's in Salmon Arm is 1.24. But we went through a town south of her where it's 1.19 a liter.



Rebecca. I've seen Almond milk for 3 something for a 500 something ml carton. Cheese is crazy too. 8$ for a 400ml bag of shredded cheese. I'll have to try that on Shaw. DH says to try a conference call on them and see what happens.

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