dog farts

Rosie - posted on 01/11/2011 ( 225 moms have responded )

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i know a few people work with animals here, so i have a question for ya!! my dog has been really gassy for a couple of weeks now. is that a bad sign? he acts fine, he just stinks to high heaven. should i change his food? he's on a weight control food and has been for almost 2 years. any other causes? should i call a vet?

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Kate CP - posted on 01/11/2011

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"actually dogs ARE carnivores, they teach you that in grade 4. "

I'm just going to do this now because I really think it needs to be said.

I understand the point you're trying to make, Julianne, but you have a tendency to come off as REALLY fucking insulting.

Also, they teach you that Christopher Columbus discovered America and obviously that's not entirely true, either. Dogs are not STRICTLY carnivores like big cats are. They are scavengers and do need a varied diet that consists of more than JUST meat. THAT was my entire point.

Mary - posted on 01/13/2011

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Dear God....EVERYone in any type of caregiver occupation is ONLY in it for the big bucks and glory. Oh - and they are all secretly a bunch of control freaks and sadists; their true purpose is to cause as much harm as they possibly can to each and every patient they encounter (human and animal alike). They are all idiots, and should worship at the alter of knowledge that is....

....some mom on an internet forum?....

Yeah, call me crazy, but I think I'll stick with vet, my OB, and my pediatrician. Despite their ill intentions and lesser intelligence, my animals, child, and self are all healthy and happy.

Jackie - posted on 01/13/2011

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How do you know what vets learn and what they don't? How do you know that they don't don't have all the info to make an informed decision but chose to go a different path? Just because it isn't the path that you would take personally, they must be uneducated and out for money?

And how do you feed bones appropriately? How do you know what is "natural" for a dog or cat or elephant?

And I guess that because YOUR vet does support a raw diet HE or she MUST be the "be all end all" in veterinarian medicine because he happens to agree with you?

Jackie - posted on 01/13/2011

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SO because people HAPPEN to make money doing what they love, you're not supposed to trust them? At least, that's what I'm getting out of this...



SMH

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/13/2011

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I have never EVER met a vet that wasn't in it for the animals...alot of them have no interest in the owners, and are ONLY interested in the animals well being.

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Mary - posted on 01/18/2011

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Emma, I am still amazed that the topic of Kati's dog's farting issues has generated over 200 posts....

Stifler's - posted on 01/18/2011

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This thread is full on hilarious. Everyone I know feeds their dog table scraps with some random cheap dry food in amongst it all and big beef or lamb marrow bones for a snack. Except Pete and Roxy who buy like $80/kg dog food. They do the bones thing too though. LOL.

Kate CP - posted on 01/18/2011

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They don't give racing greyhounds kibble. They give them ground meat. That's why their teeth are so bad.

Tine - posted on 01/18/2011

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Hm, it just suggests to me that perhaps his food isn't agreeing with him. Or he could have a gut problem, the little helpful digestive bacteria could be out of balance. Try changing him to food that's as natural as you can (I like feeding dogs rice, vegetables and tuna or meat scraps ... personally I prefer the tuna as I'm vego, but either is ok!). Bones are good too, as is very bland kibble like the one they give racing greyhounds. Bones can cause farting problems so maybe avoid them for a bit.

If he seems in pain, go straight to a vet, or if dietary changes don't help.
Good luck! :-)

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/14/2011

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Scooby had a scooby snack! Poor guy might regret eating all that bread!

Rosie - posted on 01/14/2011

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i always say he's our garbage disposal! unintentionally of course. i hate feeding him scraps, won't do it. hes just very sneaky. almost stealth, although a 114 lb dog probably isn't to stealth...

Rosie - posted on 01/14/2011

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he's a black lab golden retriever mix. and for as much shit as he eats he's NEVER had a problem. one halloween he ate a whole bag of chocolate, wrappers and all, and didn't get sick in the slightest. he has shit out a whole sock before. i'll keep an eye on him though kate! :)

Kate CP - posted on 01/14/2011

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Well, he may get constipated or throw up. Most dogs are okay with bread though...although not many dogs eat an entire loaf of frozen bread...what kind of dog is Scooby??

Rosie - posted on 01/14/2011

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sigh...i just cleaned my deep freeze and put the food outside to keep cold while defrosting. well vinnie let scooby out, and i forgot about it, and then realized he was out there with our food, and sure as shit he ate a loaf of bread. i think that's it though!! i wonder how bad his ass is gonna stink tonight??my damn dog! at least it's not shoes though right?? LMAO!!

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/14/2011

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I don't want to contradict myself...earlier I told you Kati, if he is suppose to weigh 75lbs, then feed him the amount for a 75 lbs dog....you can absolutely do that to make it easier on you. Cutting down the portion to 100lbs is going to be easier on him from the amount he was used to eating. So, to make it not such a shock for him...and make him hungry all the time...that is why I was recomending to the 100 lbs, and when he reaches that...or stops losing...then reduce again to the 75lbs amount. I know, a bit redundant...but I wanted to be crystal clear for anyone reading this.

I wish you and your pup the best of luck Kati!

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/14/2011

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Kati, most owners are shocked to find out how much they are actually feeding once they measure...don't feel bad! You will be amazed what happens feeding the correct amount. Go on the lower side of the portion for the 100lbs dog (if it says 4-5 cups per day, use 4) then reduce more when you are not seeing results.

So many people have trouble getting enough excersise...I just think it is awesome that you are doing something about all this! More owners need to take your lead!

Kate CP - posted on 01/14/2011

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Make the kids exercise him! Tell them to get outside and throw the ball around and make him run for at least 15 minutes. :)

Rosie - posted on 01/14/2011

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yeah i know that's a huge amount, lol! i knew how much he was supposed to be getting to, and i was just sure my eyeballing it was the appropriate amount. i actually measured out the scoops i was giving him and about shit!! no wonder he's a lard ass!! i feel bad :(

i am horrible at getting him to exercise. it's something i need to work on big time! especially in the winter time, it makes it harder for me, along with 3 kids and a husband who is not home or sleeping makes it near impossible some days. i know ,excuses excuses!!!! but i really am getting motivated by all this talk. it'll help my lard ass too! :)

Kate CP - posted on 01/13/2011

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If you give the wrong size bone, yes, it can cause a problem.



Edited to add: Right above the part where she's giving the steak bone it says "COOKING THE MEAT OFF THE BONE" so I assumed it meant she gave the dog a cooked steak bone.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/13/2011

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I don't know why I have to say something...but I do....Kate...the steak bone....doesn't specifically say it was cooked....just says she gave it to her dog to eat the meat off, and she was gonna take it from her dog before it ate the bone. The dog devoured it before she could get it. It actually NEVER says if the dog had problems with it. BUT all the other raw bones that were given to these dogs DID INDEED cause problems. That is the point I have been trying to make. Raw/cooked bones can, have, will, and may cause problems.

Kate CP - posted on 01/13/2011

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There are different types and shapes of Kong toys out there for every different chewer. The black rubber is the strongest and what I recommend for dogs who eat cinder blocks (yes, I've had a few students who did that). The red is for your "average" chewer. Most Staffies will gnaw through a red Kong in a few days. Give them the black one and it usually lasts quite a while. Also, what Marina said about supervising toys is absolutely true and great advice. Never leave a dog alone with a toy. When you start to notice things going missing from toys is when it's time to throw it away. Nothing is really "chew proof" or "indestructible" although lots of toys are marketed that way...they just tend to last a little longer.

Yes, rawhide is made out of a different type of cow skin than leather is. I use that analogy because honestly, it's still not digestible. If you want to feed rawhide to your dogs that's okay-some dogs can handle it and do great with it. I, personally, don't like the stuff and I don't use it.

The stories I read, Marina, included one where she had cooked a steak bone and given it to the dog. THAT'S the one I am referring to about cooked bones. Also, knuckle bones are really not great for large dogs. That website is for large to giant breed dogs like Danes and Newfoundlands. Dogs of that size shouldn't be getting knuckle bones.

Kati: WOW! 7-8 cups of food a day is A TON! Yes, if you cut back to what he SHOULD be eating and feed more frequent meals there is a very good chance he won't need the weight control formula. Again, you can try plain yogurt for the gas if it's bad. What brand of food are you feeding (I don't think you mentioned it)? Also, if you give treats throughout the day you need to factor that in to his diet. A lot of people don't realize how many calories is in a simple Milk Bone! That may also help him lose weight and get healthy.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/13/2011

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Kati, if you can...try feeding three times a day unstead of 2...if you can...it will curb the appetite that much more...

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/13/2011

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yeah, those big guys with those big teeth and strong jaws need metal...not plastic to chew on! Lol...

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/13/2011

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I am so glad you looked! Yay! Yeah, that much of a difference, and the age appropriate food, and yoy may not need a low fat..just a maintanance diet! That is great! Just like us, ther need the excersise, and with the reduced food intake, correct food, and walking 1/2 hour per day...the weight will fly off! If you feel like you are reducing food amount too much...go by the 100lbs recommended dose, then once he reaches that goal, reduce to the 75lbs dose...bring into the vet to weigh, like every 3 weeks to make sure not losing to quickly...and they will keep track in your chart for you!

Amie - posted on 01/13/2011

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Kati,



I just realized. I don't think anyone's asked you how much exercise your dog gets??



That is important too. When we got Sasha she was overweight. Her owner "liked pudgy dogs". Ugh. When we switched her to the dog food we wanted (the horizon) she started on the senoir/weight loss one. We made sure to take her out a lot. Still do. She's getting older but you wouldn't know it. She's active and healthy. She's still got some pudge on her but it is going away.

Rosie - posted on 01/13/2011

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ok, so marina you said to feed him what he's SUPPOSED to weigh, instead of what he does weigh? that's a huge difference. i did look at how much i've been feeding him, positive he was getting his recommended amount and am ASTONISHED at how much more he's getting than recommended. he's supposed to get 4 1/2 cups (if we go by the over 100 lb chart) and he'd been getting probably 7-8 cups when i actually measured it. so is he supposed to have the 75 lb (cause that's what he should weigh) amount?
also, can a dog lose that much weight? is it really possible that i can get him to lose 30 + lbs?
gotta go get my kid from school so i'll be back. thank you!!! :)

Amie - posted on 01/13/2011

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Marina,
Sasha is a Staffordshire Bull Terrier (5 years in March) and Hooch is a Staffordshire Bull Terrier/German Shepherd mix (1 year in April).

Laura,

Hooch has chewed through 4 pairs of my "night out" shoes. No shit. =O He's also a puppy though and I chalk it up to teething. I could have choked him but I went out and had a smoke instead. I learned to always make sure my shoes are up high where he can not get them. Or rather, anything he might get in his head to chew on. /:)

Mary - posted on 01/13/2011

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Amie, I had the same problem with my pit and the Kong. It was great for the Ridgeback - especially if I put peanut butter in it and froze it overnight - he would be occupied by that thing all day! My retarded pit bull (who at almost 8, has the chewing tendencies of a lab puppy) shredded that same frozen Kong within a 4 hour timespan. Little red pieces all over the freaking place!

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/13/2011

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I believe it! I was referring to little dogs...like shi tzu's and that size...I don't know what you have for dogs...but they can make it through just about anything!

Amie - posted on 01/13/2011

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Marina, if it was just wear and tear, no problem. She destroyed the thing though. LOL

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/13/2011

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Yeah, kongs in my experience are best fitted for little dogs...but even they can make there way through them if you are not constantly vigilant with the wear and tear.

Amie - posted on 01/13/2011

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Kate,
Raw hide, that I've been able to find out about in any case, is not made from the same material as the leather humans use for clothing and accessories.

Cows have 2 layers of skin, the outside tougher one is what is use for humans. The inside is the one used for raw hide treats. The thicker ones you can find, the better. Some really are thin but then again, they tend to be the cheap ones you find in stores. If you can find and buy as fresh as possible ones, they are not rock hard either. Again, like the cheap ones found in stores.

I'm not trying to convince anyone of anything. I do what I do and my dogs are well taken care of. The raw hide treats they have are thick enough and big enough that they need to sit and gnaw for awhile before anything happens. I understand it poses a risk for them, as well as the bones they chew. They also are never given anything outside the house to chew or eat. It is all indoors where I can see them.

On a different note, I hate Kong toys. My brothers g/f convinced me to get one for Sasha. Well, Sasha chewed through the entire damn thing in less than 2 days. I was finding red bits all over the house. She's tear a piece off, spit it somewhere and start over again on the toy. She's a medium to large sized dog, so I got her the large sized toy. Pfftt... I figured I would buy her another one, XL size to see how she did with that instead. Same damn thing. Red bits all over the house. =/

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/13/2011

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I have helped take pieces of kongs out of pets to...that Kati is why I didn't recommend any bones,....W have even taken tennis balls, nyla bones, those rope toys, squeekers, and of course many bones. the key? Never leave your pet unsupervised with potentially harmful toys....just like a toddker should not be left alone with toys...

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/13/2011

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Kate...I re-read for the 4th time...every one that had an issue was raw....both the knuckle bones said specifically raw....the steak bone is the only one that I noticed didn't specify...but the dog had no problems in the end on that one....everyone else was specifically talking about a raw diet.....one did state (after her pet had surgery to remove peices of bone) that she now cookes, and takes the meat off the bone for the dog to consume.

Kate CP - posted on 01/13/2011

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Okay, back late to the party. Man, I take a nap and y'all take off!

Marina: Those stories included a few where they cooked the bones and gave the dogs left overs-BIG no-no. Also, Lisa is sort of right about vet's education on nutrition. Many have absolutely NO clue about nutrition except what information they get from pet food companies. I had one vet tell me Beneful was a good brand of food to feed. o.O

BUT! The *good* vets go out and continue their education, keep learning, and absorb so much more than what is just thrown at them. More and more vets are starting to see the benefits to a raw diet when fed appropriately.

How do you know what size of a bone to feed to a dog? Look at the dog's head and muzzle and compare it to the bone. If they can easily close their mouth around the bone and most of it disappears then it's too small and is a serious choking hazard (this is also a good way to tell if your chew toys are too small, too). A bone should be big enough that the dog has to sit or lay down and actually work at eating it for a while before any can be ingested. Raw soup bones are a great choice for many small to medium sized dogs as a natural chew. Kong toys are
**A W E S O M E** and available at every pet store. You can stuff them with all sorts of goodies, freeze them, and they're dishwasher safe on the top rack (give it an extra rinse after to wash it to make sure there's no soapy residue). They bounce, they roll, and they're super durable. I *****LOOOOOOOOOOVE***** Kong toys! :)

Why are rawhides bad? It's cow skin. What else is cow skin? Your leather boots, your hand bag, your wallet...if your dog can't digest these items they can't digest rawhide. Not to mention many rawhides aren't made in the America and have a tendency to carry Salmonella and E. Coli. I steer clear of ALL rawhides including the flip chips, granulated, and compressed. None of that stuff is good for a dog. What's a good natural chew for dogs? Deer antlers! Also something called Choobles (beef esophagus), and for smaller dogs choohooves (cow hooves) are good. Always make sure you get the appropriate size item for your dog. Anything can become a choking hazard or can become lodged in the digestive tract if it's the right size.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/13/2011

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How would you know how exactly these people were feeding there pets? Maybe they were doing exactly what you do.....they just had a negative outcome. I posted those stories as a warning...that it can happen.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/13/2011

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The waltham at the vet office i worked at WAS prescription. Some doctors learn about raw diets. Infact, i am waiting on one of my vet friends to give me a response to the raw bones. I worked with her for years, and I conpletely trust her professional advice on this subject.

Bordatella pertussis..yes I know Lisa...in the vet world, that in dogs is kennel cough...or simy pertussis. In cats it is herpes, or referred to as an upper respitory infection.

Minnie - posted on 01/13/2011

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Do these veterinarians actually learn about raw diets at the seminars? And pour through peer-reviewed studies that show that eating a natural biologically-appropriate diet (including bones) is going to kill our animals? I mean, you just posted annectotes from people saying bones hurt their animals (but they obviously were feeding them inappropriately).

Our vet DOES support a raw diet.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/13/2011

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The food at a vet is prescription...if given to a pet that does not have the specific ailment it is ment for, it can make a healthy dog sick. Like diets for specific kinds of urinary stones/crystals...if this formula is given to a pet that does not have oxcylate crystals, they can actually form stones of them. That is one reason tgey are not wold over the counter...misuse can lead to problems....just like ys prescribing medicine for ourselves...in the wrong hands, it can create problems. Prescriptions.

Minnie - posted on 01/13/2011

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Dear God, Mary, and we are all strikingly healthy and happy as well! Funny, how that is.



Interesting to see how many of you assume that I think doctors and vets are out to get us and yet I clearly have stated that we have utilized their services. And will continue to do so.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/13/2011

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Lisa, that is awesome that you have done your research. I commend you for that. But many people have access to the interenet, and self diagnosis and treatment brings lots of business to vets, and doctors alike. I truly think it is great what you are doing, but in conjunction with veterinary medicine, you should have some healthy critters.

On that note, yes many seminars are sponsered by specific food companies like Hills. But that is not the only education they receive. They usually have a list of speakers they can choose from and what specialty...like allergies, pharmacy, micro, uti, upper respitory, ultrasound, dental, anestesia, and if course diet..the list goes on...it is not centered around that specific food. They have food reps that go clinic to clinic for that. The seminars are for continued education.

Amy - posted on 01/13/2011

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Hm....See, I would never have suspected my dog on the farting...my husband maybe...:) alright, I'm coming in late on this, and by no means reading ten pages.

Sometimes they change formulas in dog foods and their tummies react differently. I used the same dog food for years with mine and then all of a sudden, they were barfing with it. I changed food and they were fine. I'd call a vet, just to be sure it's nothing major. Couldn't hurt.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/13/2011

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Bordatella is a vax...not a condition. They get upper respitory infections that are typical in cats, highly contagious and can be treated with antibiotics. maybe you found a vet that simply misdiagnosed, or just didn't have a clue.

Minnie - posted on 01/13/2011

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I'm not paranoid. I just do my own research and have come to different conclusions. One situation: with our first cats years ago we took them to a clinic solely for cats. They had digestive issues, vomiting, diarrhea, runny eyes, you name it they had it. She told me "oh you need to get this particular food. Your cats are Siamese, so they NEED this food. " (But of course, this food I could only purchase at a veterinarian office). We took them for a second opinion elsewhere, turns out they had bordatella.



Yes, I do believe they believe these particular products are the best because they are schooled to believe they are. Does that mean they are the best though? I am very well aware of the continuing education involved with the medical profession. Don't assume that the education received though isn't funded by companies with a vested interest and that the information provided isn't biased.



What I am arguing is that there aren't any products that are truly needed. Products, products products. Just feed the animals as they're suppose to be fed. More and more people are becoming aware of the necessity of a diet comprised of foods as close to their natural state as possible. Why is it any different for animals?

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/13/2011

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On one final last note, a vet is NOT going to carry a product in his/her clinic that they do not believe in. Why do I know this even if they are gonna get paid for it? Becouse they will not prescribe it to your pet if it does not work...then it is taking up valuable shelf space for the products that do. A vet is not going to sell you a product that they do not stand behind,.,it is their reputation on the line. The product may not work for your pet specific needs, so they try another...they search until they find the right product.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/13/2011

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"I'm not saying that at all- just that there is a HUGE amount of information out there and they can't get all of it in their schooling. It's no lie that there are advertisements galore at vet and doctor's offices. It's also not a lie that companies fund these nutrition seminars." Yes Lisa this is true, but Vets learn from eachother and experienc.

Also, they are in a much better position finding out the correct info, especially since they are constantly in contact with speciallist, and other vets...constantly exchanging info and education...constantly learning about new techniques...just becoiuse they are out of school does not mean they stop learning...infact once they leave school is when the real work begins! (not to down play the school) They have access to so many more advances than the average person...remember...you have your pets everyday...they have hundreds of pets every month...they need to be educated...that is their job.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/13/2011

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But I can say, carrots are very good for their teeth...so are apples.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/13/2011

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Kati, concering "safe" chew toys, there truly are no safe ones. They all could pose a potential risk of breaking teeth, ingestion leading to blockages...etc...So I will say, call your vet and ask what they recommend. I know what I use, but I would not want to recomend something that could potentially harm your loved one. (very diplomatic answer, yes I know)

~♥Little Miss - posted on 01/13/2011

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I have NEVER met a vet that was "in it for the money" First of all, they pay mediocore, on the job risk is very high, and there is alot of new advances daily that are constantly being learned. It is a hard ass job for little recognition. The entire field is very difficult, and selfless. How many times I have been at work from 10 am to 7pm...only to have an emergency sx walk through the door as I am leaving....and stay until 3 am...with thanks only. But it was for the animal that was suffering....Anyone in the field is in it for the Animals.

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