dogs at farmers markets

Rosie - posted on 07/28/2011 ( 99 moms have responded )

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i frequent farmers markets, and in my city they allow dogs at farmers markets. everytime i go i get irritated to see them there. then yesterday in the opinion page of our local paper i saw someone else griping about them as well.
i think it's gross, a lot of people don't pick up their dogs waste and i'd rather not step in dog poop while i'm shopping for food. not only the hygiene factor that gets to me, the person in the opinion page mentioned their child was caught in the middle of a 4 dog fight. their kid could've gotten seriously hurt, but luckily didn't.
what do you guys think? yay or nay for dogs at farmers markets.

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Kate CP - posted on 07/30/2011

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Sherri, I have seen female spayed dogs hike their legs to mark territory. Doesn't matter the sex or whether or not the dog has been sterilized: some dogs just mark. Period.

Fertilizing a crop with manure is one thing...having dog excrement on your food is another. Dogs carry a host of diseases (like hookworms and giardiasis) that manure is usually treated for BEFORE it's used on food crops.

I'm not so worried about contamination as I am with having a BUNCH of people with a BUNCH of dogs...it makes things chaotic and dogs can get snappy in situations like that. Or if some one is backing up a farm truck and some chick with a tiny chihuahua (or some other obnoxious rat-dog) isn't paying attention the dog could get run over. Generally speaking, dogs and human food establishments are usually not a good mix.

Kate CP - posted on 07/30/2011

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I have no problem with service or therapy dogs at a market like that. But they've been trained to behave and not mark or mess anywhere without permission.

I'd NEVER take my nutty schnauzer to a market like that. Yes, folks, even dog trainers can have nutty dogs. :P But I recognize and respect his limits and don't push him. I don't think any ol' dog belongs in a produce market, though.

Mary - posted on 08/01/2011

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Dyan, I actually looked it up for your city, and as right now, there is NO required license for dogs. What I found was that your city council debated and vetoed a proposal last summer to require the licensing of animals. It would have been as pointless as the one in my county; it sounds like it's sole purpose was to produce revenue, and really had nothing to do with enforcing either current vaccinations or any other type of ownership responsibilities.

Mary - posted on 07/31/2011

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Since my boys are both rescues, they are neutered, but it wasn't done until they ended up at the shelter. One was about 9 months old, the other was 4 years. The "habit" of cocking their leg to mark their territory is too firmly entrenched. When we go on those 3-5 mile walks, they will do it at any opportunity they get, even when their bladder has long since been depleted, and it is literally an "empty gesture".

Obviously, they don't do this inside, but once outdoors, anything and everything is fair game to them. There is no way, in a crowded farmer's market, where I might need to divert my attention to actually look at the produce or pay for it, that one of those two fools wouldn't hit up the corner of a stall. Unless I catheterized them just prior to entering the grounds, there is no way I (or any other normal owner) could guarantee that they wouldn't be able to squeeze out a few drops to mark some of that doggy-licious smelling territory. Which is why I remain firmly on the side of no dogs allowed.

Kate CP - posted on 07/31/2011

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Jennifer: Service dogs and therapy dogs are an important part of our daily lives and culture and are actually federally protected. By law you are allowed to take your service dog ANYWHERE you go. NO ONE can tell you you CAN'T have your service dog with you.

Now, most chihuahuas are NOT service dogs and are actually rather obnoxious (I've been bitten by more chihuahuas than I can count). But ANY dog, regardless of it's size, that has been trained for service or therapy work has a temperament that is calm, gentle, friendly, and attentive. Most chihuahuas aren't like that.

About the registering with the city thing...yea, ALL cities require that. That doesn't mean people DO it.

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Im actually more sickened by humans sanitation, than dogs. I have seen people pick their nose, cough, whatever else and then pick upa serving spoon on a buffet. If anyone has ever worked in a resturant than you know this is true. and if you havent, then youve atleast heard some stories. and I havent heard of any major problems of dog fights at the farmer market. And another thing is how do you know these problem dogs do not belong to the vendors?they might have let their dogs sniff and piss all over those delicious red perfectly rip tomatoes :D

~♥Little Miss - posted on 08/01/2011

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Dyan, just call your Vet office to find out legally what you are responsible to do. That is the quickest way to the the accurate info. They actually may register them for you. I know some places do that.

Charlie - posted on 08/01/2011

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I am actually suprised at how low your fines are Sherri , our fines here are astronomical .....
These offences include:

Unregistered dog
No registration tag on the collar
No ID disk on collar
Not informing Council of changed ownership or address details
Exercising an unmuzzled greyhound
Dog in a public place not under the effective control of a competent person
Dog in a prohibited place
Dog defecating in a public place without removal
Dog making an offensive noise

These start at around $70 and upward of $250 .

Most range between $100-$200.

Amie - posted on 07/31/2011

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I think the dog laws are strictly enforced everywhere, it just depends on the size of the place you live as to whether you see it or not. I remember being in the city. They do what they can but obviously the animals outnumber the workers/volunteers. In the small town I grew up in, you never saw a loose animal that wasn't caught within minutes(and even then, it was generally an animal that got out of a fenced yard), nor did you see animals pooping & peeing everywhere, it was rare to see an irresponsible pet owner because of the size of the town. It was easy to track down the schmuck who wasn't taking proper care of their animal.



As for dog licensing, I've never heard of any urban area not having this set up. Licensing a dog and registering one are two different things. At least here they are, a registered dog is a purebred that has it's papers. They are expensive. A licensed dog is the one you get the tag from the town/city for.



I live in a rural area now and we don't need to license our animals but they are chipped and the city as well as the closest town knows our animals chip codes. In case they ever do get away, they know who to call.



Now for the OP. I wholeheartedly agree with Mary. I would not take my dogs to the farmers market. I'll ignore the fact that ours is in a huge indoor building (it was built specifically for the farmers market). There are adults and children alike who are unpredictable around animals. I also know my own dogs, while Sasha does well around new people. Hooch doesn't do as well, he's too protective of his family. He also likes to pee over any scent he comes across. It was such a pain to walk him when we were in the city. I swear it felt like he was stopping every 5 feet. =/

Sherri - posted on 07/31/2011

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Dyan your state does require dog licensing over the age of 6mo's old. So you may want to ck it out, so you are in compliance. Usually it is done wherever you register your vehicles.

Stifler's - posted on 07/31/2011

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Here you have to have your dog registered to own one. The council are cracking down on it because people's dogs get out of their yard and no one has any idea who they belong to so they have to go to the pound instead of if they were registered they could call the owners to come and get them.

Mrs. - posted on 07/31/2011

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I find that odd, Dana. There are so many places allowing and encouraging dogs on patios in the summer in my city. Some don't, but the ones that do, if I was not keen on dogs, I'd avoid them. It is easy to tell by the dogs sitting on the patio with a leash on.

Rosie - posted on 07/31/2011

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what's all this registering talk? i've never heard of it, now i feel like i'm doing something illegal....

Dana - posted on 07/31/2011

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Yes, Sherri, it's strictly enforced here, as well as other places, I'm sure...

Jennifer - posted on 07/31/2011

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Sherri- That is how it should be EVERYWHERE! The fines and everything. In my town it has the beginnings of that type of set up but it doesn't go far enough to remove the dog, the owners just get fines. It would create jobs to have that system in place and at the same time create enough revenue to pay the "puppy patrol". Mandatory neutering should be implemented everywhere unless a person purchases a breeding permit (Which should cost at least twice as much as the neutering fees) for every year their dog is not neutered.

Feen and Marina: I think it's amazing that dogs can sense it and I am very thankful for my little girl. She is the perfect size to sit on my lap when I drive because sometimes a bark can make me jump when one is about to happen, which is why I Needed a small one to ride on my lap. She was actually a rescue from a puppy mill. She had 30+ babies in 6 years and the owner was then going to have her put to sleep. She had been pregnant 10 times and they were going to just throw her away! My friend overheard them talking and told them "Helz no! and took her and brought her to me. When she first came to me it was like having a 6 year old puppy because she had never seen the outside of a cage. She didn't know how to do stairs or basically anything about where to do her business. She also refused to eat or drink for the first 2 weeks. I had to force feed and hydrate her. It gave us time to bond and I think because of that bond, she is especially sensitive to me and my issues. Due to her having been in a mill, I was told by several trainers as well as Paws with a cause that she would never be a service animal but I finally found one that would train her and she learned quick. It only took 6 months of training to have her field ready. My friends have asked me what I will do if something happens to her and I basically tell them that I hope we both get hit by the same train. I can't imagine my life without her now.

Sherri - posted on 07/31/2011

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@Dana the difference is I think if it is strictly enforced or not?? It sounds where others live it may not be enforced hardly at all, hence the problem. Here most wouldn't dare not to abide by the rules because under no circumstances will they pull any punches.

Dana - posted on 07/31/2011

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Sherri, those are basic laws for animals pretty much anywhere in the States but, there are still many people who don't abide by them.

I'm just glad that where I live any animal, unless it IS a registered service animal, can not be in any place where food is being sold, inside OR outside.

Charlie - posted on 07/31/2011

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Jenn - I have / had ( havent had a seizure in years) epilepsy my dog toby who has since passed away used to start whining and nuzzling at me all frantic right before i would have a fit , he wasnt trained but he knew it was coming everytime !!!

Dogs are awesome.

Sherri - posted on 07/31/2011

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@Mary - Okay never once in any of my posts ever have I said kids were always impeccably well behaved.

As far as dogs in public here they have to be it is STRICTLY enforced. Your dog has to be licensed by a certain date yearly and MUST be displayed around their neck at all times. if you do not register your dog by April 30th you get a civil fine of $25, if then not pd and your dog is not registered within 15days a $50 fine will be issued and once again if not pd and your dog not registered within 15days then they come and seize custody of your dog.

Not to mention if any person does not clean up after their pet and you are caught especially in such place as a farmers market were you would never be at unless you were a town resident, then you will also be fined $30 for every dog fouling incident you didn't clean up after your pet for.

Also if you have a dog that is NOT people or pet friendly, don't dare take it in public. Because if fight or biting incident happens with another dog or person then your dog can be seized, you can be fined and when you get your dog back they can NEVER be taken into public again or you will permanently lose custody of your dog.

So is it perfect nope but almost nobody is not a very responsible pet owner here, because if you aren't. You will either be out a bit of money or you will eventually lose custody of your dog.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/31/2011

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That is awesome Jennifer, not your condition, but the fact that your dog can predict it. Animals are amazing. Thanks for sharing your story.

Jennifer - posted on 07/31/2011

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Dyan- I did not say I condoned them pooping at the farmers market. I personally think that the owners should be responsible and train them NOT to poop there and if they do, then clean it up! If a dog were in a supermarket and happened to poop by mistake, I wouldn't have a fuss about it as long as it was cleaned up. No more bothersome than if it pooped at the farmers market. I think dogs should be trained not to but if it does happen and it gets cleaned up.... who cares? It's not like the food is left on the floor at the supermarket. Oh, and I wash all my fruits and veggies before eating them. I KNOW what environment they came from.

Marina- Chihuahua's are often not used as a service animal because they don't kennel train well. They need to have a personal trainer come to the house to train them rather than having an agency train them. That's why you don't see a lot of them. (The smallest that Paws with a cause will use is Pomeranian's) I have a medical condition that comes on rather suddenly and causes me to freeze. It is a type of seizure and the medication to avoid attacks is very addictive as well as sedating. Because I want to be able to drive and be active, we have trained my service animal to give me about 30 seconds notice before an attack. (She paws at my leg) I then get to a safe location, take my medication and have to sit for about 20 minutes for the medication to take effect. When the medication is taken to avoid an attack, it is less sedating and since it isn't being ingested 3 times a day it is also not as addictive.

We also have a Lhasa Apso that we tried to train for this purpose but he is a little too ADHD to be able to focus for this job. He is just a pet now but he too is well trained. He is older and has his limits and because I know his limits, I wouldn't put him in a situation where he would behave badly. My Chihuahua is 5.2 lbs and I can carry a plate of food with her nose almost in it and she wont' touch it. She doesn't bark at people when we are out and she is very focused. She is also a mama's girl which is why she works so well. I was fortunate this little girl trained for praise. (food wasn't even a training tool)

Dana - posted on 07/31/2011

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That would make sense, Cathy.
We had a female cat who spent the first 15 yrs of her life indoors. When we moved to where we live now, it was safe for her to be an indoor/outdoor cat. She must have noticed male cats spraying because she started "spraying" her pee up along things too. It was very odd. She was a peculiar cat though, she was very territorial and walked the boarder of our property "guarding" it. She was part Siamese which is maybe why she was so odd too. She also taught herself to use the toilet, as in OUR toilet. Best animal I've ever had. ♥

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/31/2011

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LOL, he is very "special" ;) it really is quite odd. Not to say it never happens, cause obviously you are living proof...or really your dog is. How strange.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/31/2011

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Cathy, that is really unusual. Was it learned by another male dog around him? Maybe even just at a dog park? My friend had a male dog, and the other friend female. They were both fixed. They both taught each other how to pee their way. The boy started squatting, and the girl started hiking....very weird. They were only really around eachother at the hospital too....they would go play in the yard together maybe a couple of times per month.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/31/2011

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All the Farmers Markets that I have been to have been on concrete or gravel, I have never seen a dog poop there. I have also never seen a dog pee there. Not to say it doesn't happen, and if they have it outdoors on grass, with dogs allowed, well....it is kinda expected for them to shit and piss in grass IMO. By like I said, all the ones I have been to have been like parking lot, or concrete.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/31/2011

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Jennifer, I have had the honor of working with many service dogs. The vet I worked for had a program set up with C.H.A.M.P. They are amazing people, and amazing working dogs. I have never seen a service dog under 15lbs though, maybe even 20. May I ask what you have a service dog for? I am very interested how this small dog assists you, unless it is things like counter work,.

Rosie - posted on 07/31/2011

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jennifer you would be ok with dogs pooping on the floor inside a grocery store too then?

Mary - posted on 07/31/2011

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Yeah - my county "requires" dog and cat licenses as well. However, it's not something they go around enforcing, unless your dog is involved in some type of altercation requiring official intervention. Unless you want to gain access to one of the off-lease parks, it's not something that is ever asked for. It's really a bit of a joke, and most people do not obtain them. The only thing required to get one is proof of current rabies vaccination (but no others). You get a "discount" on the yearly fee if you provide proof that your pet is neutered. The local boarding kennels require more than any county in my state! The only reason I get this ridiculous license is so that I can take my dogs to the nearby off-lease park; access is controlled by a keypad lock, whose passcode is routinely changed. You have to have a current license to be given the code.

Carolee - posted on 07/31/2011

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Nobody said they didn't wash their food before they eat it. That doesn't mean I want my food to smell like dog.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/31/2011

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Yes Sherri, you are exactly right. If you neuter a male dog before it is sexually mature, they typically do not hike their legs....they will squat. BUT, they can LEARN to hike their legs from other male dogs that have not been neutered, or were neutered past their sexual maturity. Those dogs lift their legs continuously, from one spot to the next. A dog that learns to hike later, usually does not go from one spot to the next marking his territory like a previously said, but will usually relieve himself FULLY in the first spot they hike their legs on.

If you do not want your male dog to mark his territory, neuter him BEFORE or AT 6 months.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/31/2011

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Heather, it is very unusual for female dogs to hike their legs. It is usually a learned behavior. As for the humping, that is a dominance thing, and she should never be allowed to hump you or your kids. She hopefully is just doing it to her own toys.

Jennifer - posted on 07/31/2011

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Kate- My service dog is a Chihuahua aka "Obnoxious rat dog" and believe me, she MOVES if something is coming at her. Little dogs out of self preservation get out of the way and are very attentive. I have found most larger dogs are more likely to get in the way or run over because they don't even care if they move.

And to address the others who keep saying they are unsanitary at an outdoor market.... wow.... do you think that birds don't poop on that stuff out in the field? Do you think that flies are not regurgitation all over the veggies when they land on them? Do you think that in the field that raccoons and other animals haven't taken a dump right next to or even on them? It's not like there is some magic barrier for farmers fields that keep all defecating animals out of the crops. This is why WASHING the items is recommended before eating them.

In our town the owners must register their pets AND have that registration on them if they bring the dog downtown. If they do not have their registration they could be fined. In order to get the registration, vet records must be produced. Our town is a very dog friendly place. Owners take their dogs everywhere and we don't have too much trouble because the dogs are socialized and the "bad" owners are chastised by other dog owners if they bring their ill behaved animal to the public places.

Jennifer - posted on 07/31/2011

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Kate- My service dog is a Chihuahua aka "Obnoxious rat dog" and believe me, she MOVES if something is coming at her. Little dogs out of self preservation get out of the way and are very attentive. I have found most larger dogs are more likely to get in the way or run over because they don't even care if they move.

And to address the others who keep saying they are unsanitary at an outdoor market.... wow.... do you think that birds don't poop on that stuff out in the field? Do you think that flies are not regurgitation all over the veggies when they land on them? Do you think that in the field that raccoons and other animals haven't taken a dump right next to or even on them? It's not like there is some magic barrier for farmers fields that keep all defecating animals out of the crops. This is why WASHING the items is recommended before eating them.

In our town the owners must register their pets AND have that registration on them if they bring the dog downtown. If they do not have their registration they could be fined. In order to get the registration, vet records must be produced. Our town is a very dog friendly place. Owners take their dogs everywhere and we don't have too much trouble because the dogs are socialized and the "bad" owners are chastised by other dog owners if they bring their ill behaved animal to the public places.

Jennifer - posted on 07/31/2011

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Kate- My service dog is a Chihuahua aka "Obnoxious rat dog" and believe me, she MOVES if something is coming at her. Little dogs out of self preservation get out of the way and are very attentive. I have found most larger dogs are more likely to get in the way or run over because they don't even care if they move.

And to address the others who keep saying they are unsanitary at an outdoor market.... wow.... do you think that birds don't poop on that stuff out in the field? Do you think that flies are not regurgitation all over the veggies when they land on them? Do you think that in the field that raccoons and other animals haven't taken a dump right next to or even on them? It's not like there is some magic barrier for farmers fields that keep all defecating animals out of the crops. This is why WASHING the items is recommended before eating them.

In our town the owners must register their pets AND have that registration on them if they bring the dog downtown. If they do not have their registration they could be fined. In order to get the registration, vet records must be produced. Our town is a very dog friendly place. Owners take their dogs everywhere and we don't have too much trouble because the dogs are socialized and the "bad" owners are chastised by other dog owners if they bring their ill behaved animal to the public places.

Mary - posted on 07/31/2011

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Sherri, where is this Mayberry-like town you live in? From a number of your posts, I'm getting the impression that it is some utopian place where people take their dogs and children everywhere, and they are all impeccably behaved. The kids never act up, the dogs never cock their legs, and every parent/owner is a responsible, considerate role model who is in complete control.

Are you sure your water supply isn't spiked with valium (or hallucinogenics)?

Stifler's - posted on 07/31/2011

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I don't see the point of taking a dog to the markets. You can't let them off the leash and play fetch, eetc.
The markets I've been to you can hardly move through the people let alone people bringing their dog. I've never seen dogs at the markets. What's the point.

Lady Heather - posted on 07/30/2011

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My spayed female dog lifts her leg on anything and everything. Ha. She's big into humping too. It's umm...disturbing. But we do not take her to the farmer's market. Have to be very careful where you take that one...

Our market though is very open. You would probably not even notice the dogs that are there, except for a crowd at the pet bakery stall. I guess I just don't see the big deal of that if you have the right dog for it. We also have more outdoor patio places encouraging dogs downtown. The coffee shops put water dishes out for them. This is actually a pretty dog unfriendly place with very few parks even allowing dogs so lots of people walk their dogs in town and then take a coffee/water break. In our part of town we have a million parks and the only place our dogs can go is this little river walk. It's so lame. So I kind of see how people end up taking their dogs into town. Having to drive somewhere to walk your dog is pretty stupid.

Sherri - posted on 07/30/2011

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First our Farmers Market although outside is a fixed place with zero traffic other than the parking lot. Where the tables are is for foot traffic only NO vehicles allowed.

I see your point I am just saying it is typically the norm to have them here whether it be at the farmers market, kids sports games, and now a lot of restaurants around here.

I think most people tend to be very responsible with their dogs and know how they will react around other people and other dogs. We have never encountered a dog that hasn't been extremely well behaved in public.

Sherri - posted on 07/30/2011

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Also even if your dog messes I have never seen anyone that doesn't carry bags and cleans it up immediately and disposes of it. It is also a city ordinance anyways and you can get fined if you don't and get caught.

As for dogs allowed at restaurants our T-Bones now encourages patrons to bring their dogs to their outside terrace set with a pet menu as well. Also in the next town the ice cream parlor also encourages pets with a pet ice cream menu as well. It is becoming more common to find many places especially eateries that have outside seating to encourage people to bring pets. I think to drum up business and make more money.

Sherri - posted on 07/30/2011

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@Marina actually if you have male dogs neutered early many will NEVER lift their leg to pee. I have a 2 1/2 yr old boxer that has never lifted his leg to pee, my friends have a 1yr old Newfie that also doesn't lift his leg to pee, and my other friends have a 1yr old Golden Retriever that doesn't lift his leg. My cousins dog is around 3 and he obnoxiously lifts his leg and pees and marks everything, I can't stand that dog, but I think he was neutered slightly later. Usually if they are neutered by 5mo's they will never lift their leg.

Elfrieda - posted on 07/30/2011

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Yay from me. I like seeing the dogs at the farmers market. It makes the place feel cheerful. In all my life I think I've seen dog poop probably once at a farmer's market, and I've never seen a dog pee on a booth.

And let's get real, people. What do you think is so sanitary about the veggies that a dog walking by will contaminate it? Do you know what they fertilize fields with?

Rosie - posted on 07/30/2011

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our markets are all outside. they close off like 4 city blocks and use the streets for the vendors.

how did you guys find your local codes on this? i can't figure out how to, lol.

Charlie - posted on 07/30/2011

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Yeah I get that , I am just expanding on dog owners responsibility in a crowded enviroment in relation to the OP and how we cannot know another persons dog or their behaviour therefore allowing all dogs desexed or not , trained or not is a recipe for trouble.

Pissing on things is one just one aspect , there is no need for a dog at a produce market , its nice to take dogs out and they should be taken out but take them to an off leash park or off leash area of the beach .

Sal - posted on 07/30/2011

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i have taken the poodle on picincs but always tether him while people are eating.....

Sal - posted on 07/30/2011

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our markets are mostly outdoors too so it isn;t such an issue for me, but i can totally see how it could become one, and just becasue you want nice local produce doensn't mean you want a side order of dog with it!!! i am not a fan of people who think that EVERYWHERE is dog friendly and just because they can't get enough of their pooch they want to give the whole world the same joy...
i do have dogs, my kids are ok with dogs but not great and yes a lot of dogs can scare them, one of ours is strictly a home dog, he is too big old and stupid to take out, (we have a BIG yard so it isnt a issue) and the other is a miniture poodle, he does like to go for walks and trip with us, but i don;t take him every where, and frankly with 2 under school age kids and puppy it isn;t always a smart move anyway...but i will never take him to a food eating or buying area, we don't let him in the house when we are eating, and i certainly wouldn;t let him near others food, they are dogs, they lick their own bums yuck!!!
i get that some cafes make a dog freindly statemant and get their patrons that way, but it isn't somewhere i would go..

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/30/2011

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Loureen, we have had animal discussions in the past, and have all discussed if we had pets fixed by law by a certain age...etc etc. That is kind of what I was referring to. Male dogs lift their legs to mark their territory. Female dogs don't do that. And if all dogs were spayed and neutered by 6 months, it would be a much more pleasant time out for all......except for the shit on the ground. That involves training the owner.

Charlie - posted on 07/30/2011

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Thats the thing though we only know and care for our own dog , we have no idea whether the man over the next stall has desexed his dog or even trained it , if the markets are open to dogs they are open to ALL dogs reguardless of how much time or medical treatment the owner has put into it and I can assure you that if a person cannot be bothered training their dog they really are not going to give a shit how it behaves in public its just a fluffy little handbag which is unfourtunate but that is the nature of idiot people and their dogs .

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/30/2011

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You know, it kinda runs full circle. If people would neuter their dogs around 6 months like they are suppose to, you know....being a good owner....male dogs would not be lifting thier legs on the booths. Although I have met male neutered dogs that learn to do this from intact males, but once again....if everyone neutered.....

Charlie - posted on 07/30/2011

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Our markets are outdoors and HUGE they happen once a month and people from all around come for a great day out , I used to work the markets selling honey with my parents believe me when you are sitting there all day you see a lot of dogs pissing on anything they can cock their leg at.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/30/2011

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Carolee, no she is NOT calling anyone a whelp..LOL, it is just like saying "well"....

Mrs. - posted on 07/30/2011

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Whelp, if you really have a hankering for local produce, I guess you'll have to brave the dogs. It could be worse, you could have to avoid high maintenance uber rich folks buying gourmet cheese at Whole Foods. Personally, I prefer the pups.

Oh and I've never seen dog poop at the farmer's market, ever.

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