Doomsday Preppers

Tracey - posted on 11/10/2012 ( 18 moms have responded )

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A UK TV channel has just started showing Doomsday Preppers where people store years, sometimes hundreds of thousands of $ worth of food / water / guns etc and fortify their houses / build safe rooms in case of various disasters or the collapse of civilised society. Does anyone do this, is it a good idea to have some stores around the house?



We try to keep a month's worth of frozen, canned & dried food in the house, not because we fear earthquakes / tornados / nuclear meltdown but in case my husband lost his job and money got low we wouldn't have to worry about food for a month while we got ourselves straight.



Thoughts?

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Deborah - posted on 11/19/2012

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You have life insurance right (or would if you could afford it)? You have health insurance (again, or would if you could afford it)? You have car insurance? etc. Think of food storage and 'prepper' type stuff in the same light. You are preparing for the unexpected. You are preparing for a time when you could not handle the situation given your resources at that time. Here in the USA people complain about the cost of insurance, but if/when something horrible happens and their insurance comes through they are greatful they had it all along.



Maybe for you, it's the end of the world you are preparing for, but maybe it's just the end of YOUR world AS YOU KNOW IT that you can prepare for. And by that I mean the larger income earner in your family gets hit by a bus tomorrow, or worse, is diagnosed with something insurance doesn't fully cover and you have medical bills attacking you from every angle and income that goes away because that person can't earn it any longer. Being prepared doesn't have to be a 'crazy' idea. Starting with a one month supply is perfect. Work on doubling that by picking up 2 instead of one when stores have a buy one get one free sale or using coupons and picking up extra supplies with the amount you saved. Store extra food in inconvenient 'invisible' locations like the back of a deep closet, on the top of a high shelf, under beds - but remember to rotate! And always buy foods you like and will eat! Nothing would be worse than finding yourself in the situation of having to eat super high fiber foods that your body was not used to (oh, and did you remember to store extra toilet paper when you started storing extra food)... There are a number of sites on the internet that help you decide how much food is the right amount to store. And these sites help you remember 'all that other stuff' you would want to store as well.



Since I got married, we've made it a high priority to have 1 year's supply of food in our house. We bought it a little here and a little there and it took years. Under my son's bed are -0- oxygen sealed cans of flour, sugar, salt, rice, etc in cans that will last 30+ years. We don't rotate that stuff often, but it's alot of peace of mind knowing it's there for us. And on occation, we use it for convenience, to make the monthly grocery budget stretch a little further, or because dehydrated apples are awesome and we just want them! :) We keep it in the various nooks and crannies of our home and have peace of mind knowing that if the place my husband and I both worked at layed us off tomorrow... well, our kids would not go hungry.



We just look at it like insurance for the unexpected. Oh, and I don't think most people know we store extra because we are not crazy about it. Come over for dinner and you won't see any signs of it. Talk to us and we won't start twitching over the impending zombie-apocolypse. We just feel being prepared is as important a priority for our children's wellbeing as anything else we do for them.

Tracey - posted on 11/11/2012

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I would rather learn surival skills than spend $250,000+ on food supplies that could go off or be taken from me by someone armed.



Also wonder what some of the people on this show are thinking showing a camera crew, and therefore a worldwide TV audience where their secret supplies are.

Jodi - posted on 11/10/2012

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Nope, we'd be screwed. But to be honest, I actually think spending so much time and money worrying about something that is UNLIKELY to happen in our lifetime (it may, but who knows, right?) is actually such a waste. I can understand if you live in a region which has high likelihood of power outage or natural disaster that you want to be prepared, but I do NOT live in one of those places. In the 40+ years of my lifetime, I have only ever had a gas outage for 2 weeks. I think the longest we've ever had a power outage was overnight. I have lived through a couple of bushfires, and that's about it. So my family could survive a couple of days off what we have in the house, but otherwise, we're screwed.



I do NOT get devoting your entire life to preparing for the end of the world. I mean, don't you want to just live your life? What you have of it? You could be hit by a bus tomorrow FFS! I vaguely saw something recently that there was a 2012 end of the world command centre somewhere where people have given up their livelihoods to focus on the end of the world. I don't get it.

Michele - posted on 11/10/2012

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I live in CA so I usually have an earthquake kit but that's for about a week.



When Y2K was the thing, my dad had a year's worth of water, soda, emergency rations, and Little Debbie's snack cakes (if anything will survive the apocalypse, they will). When he moved that had to be cleaned up. Some of the water bottles had leaked. Yuck!



If you do have storage, make sure to rotate it sometimes.

Denikka - posted on 11/10/2012

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I absolutely keep extra food around the house and intend to keep even more. I have about a months worth at any time, but I do try to get more here and here (money has been an issue this far. Seems like as soon as I get ahead, something happens to set me back :P)



I have intentions on building a house, when money allows us to buy property and start building, and I do have an eye on safety and preparation for anything that may happen.

I have a binder with an assorted selection of back to basic, long term survival skills, such as food preservation, how to build a smoke house, how to can, a bicycle powered washing machine, how to make alcohol (disinfectant, not to drink, although that is another part of it), how to create basic shelter, etc.

I used to have a plan on what to do, where to go etc if things got really bad (think typical apocalypse movie type of bad. A good portion of people dead, rioting, looting, no law control etc) and how to protect myself/family/friends if conventional weapons were not available, etc. I moved just over a year ago though, so that plan has become kind of null and void. I plan on getting a map of the new city and redoing my plan in a more detail.



I think that information is THE most important thing you can have in any disaster. Supplies definitely help, but knowledge is what will save you long term. I fully intend on teaching my children how to live off the grid. I think it's good to have the ability.





It's not so much that I fear an attack or something happening. But I DO believe in being prepared. There are so many things that can happen, even down to power outages, natural disasters, and, of course, man made disasters (nuclear attacks, etc)

I do believe something is going to happen. Things cannot continue as they are going. Whether it's in my lifetime, my children's lifetimes, or my grandchildren's lifetimes, I feel it is up to me to be my part in preparing them for life and whatever may happen.



ETA

I LOVE the prepping shows XD I gotta admit that. I've seen Doomsday Preppers, I also like The Colony and general *after the apocolypse* type of movies and shows (Walking Dead). Personally, my money is on Zombies XD

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Michele - posted on 11/19/2012

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@Jaime, if my hubby ate a ton of beans we would all be dead for sure from asphyxiation. ;)



And my earthquake kit is most definitely not in glass jars on shelves! I store it in a place where I know I can get to it even if the house falls down in large plastic bins.



@Deborah - I agree with you about being prepared to handle unusual circumstances - I just don't think I need a year's worth of food and other items (also important). I have also used my earthquake kit as emergency back up when I needed to stretch the budget.

Deborah - posted on 11/19/2012

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Oh - and as far as natural disasters... just look at the northeast USA last month. I'm certain they never thought they'd be flooded inland half as far as what happened. Or that they'd still be without power weeks later in some areas. Or that a second storm would throw a blanket of snow over their flooded neighborhoods less than a week after the first storm while they were STILL without power! Shit happens... and you just can't avoid living in an area where SOMETHING can or would distupt your comfy little life. What do you do when your ability to support yourself is taken from you? The answer is to lean on someone else, or be prepared ahead of time. And you can only lean on someone else if they are willing to support you. I prefer to be prepared...

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we have a ton of beans. but the way my husband eats, it'd only last a week or two.



we'd be dead.

Lady Heather - posted on 11/13/2012

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I guess there could be a mass power outage lasting forever for some reason. I don't know why that would happen. But I suppose it could. And if you go by what happened on 24, people will be out looting inside of two hours. So we do have guns. And we have a few obese cats we could probably subsist on for a week.

Sally - posted on 11/12/2012

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Every area has it's personal disaster possibilities and it's stupid not to be prepared for them. We keep a couple months food and a few guns, but can't afford to fortify the house. We also garden and can our produce and if we can ever afford rural property, we'll have animals, an orchard, and a woodlot as well.

Tracey - posted on 11/12/2012

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Have you noticed that those scared of earthquakes have food stored in glass jars on high up shelves?

Lady Heather - posted on 11/11/2012

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We keep some extra stuff around in the winter on the off chance that the weather gets so bad that we can't get anywhere. Other than that we live in a place that isn't prone to earthquakes or other natural disasters so I don't much know what the point is. Nuclear war? I mean, I don't know...probably that's going to suck with or without food.

Denikka - posted on 11/11/2012

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Some people are genuinely convinced that a big event is going to happen that will end the world as we know it. Whether it be economical collapse, nuclear explosions, biological warfare, aliens, zombies. . .take your pick. My personal money is on zombies :P

If you truly believe in something, it's wise to prepare for it. Sometimes the people who are paranoid really do have someone watching them :P

Jodi - posted on 11/11/2012

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I've never seen the show, but......I don't have a problem with learning basic survival skills, etc, it is something everyone should learn. But all this hoarding food, spending every spare penny preparing, secret locations? I wonder if they also have plenty of tinfoil?

Denikka - posted on 11/11/2012

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They don't give out locations, some dress in disguises and/or change their names.

I think it's more that they want to educate the public that they *should* prep. Although I would agree with you Tracey, I would tell no one but my closest, and only those i could actually support with my supplies. Beyond that, you're just asking for trouble and looting, or at the VERY least mooching, if something bad should happen.

Denikka - posted on 11/10/2012

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Jodi, I can agree with you, but it's not just about hoarding supplies and whatnot.

It's also about learning. Survival skills can be used in a variety of situations. Just as an example, the same wild food finding skills that may feed you in case of an *end of the world* scenario, can also feed you if you get lost in the woods camping or hiking. The same with any wilderness survival skills (how to make shelter, how to make fire, how to find/create safe drinking water, etc) and those scenarios are much more likely to happen.



Lots of survival skills re transferable in that way. Even some of the *trade* type skills such as basic carpentry/woodworking, knitting, animal raising, etc can turn into enjoyable and even profitable hobbies.

Denikka - posted on 11/10/2012

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You're right Michele :) Rotation is SUPER important.

Your best bet is to stick with stuff you normally eat (preserved, canned, dried product) and make sure whenever you buy new product, that goes to the back and the older product goes to the front. The same thing they do in stores.

They have some pretty nifty can rotation racks out there :)

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