Euthanasia:

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Charlie - posted on 10/03/2010

11,203

111

409

Yes , why should dogs get treated with more empathy than our fellow humans .

We would never llet a dog suffer or have a very poor quality of life until death we do the humane thing and put them down yet our own species are not granted the choice of euthanasia ?

Can people not see how wrong that is ?

There are strict regulations that would be in place before a person is granted the right to euthanasia .

Amie - posted on 10/03/2010

6,596

20

412

Yes. I remember watching my maternal grandparents die. My grandfather it didn't hit me as hard because I had not seen him since I was a child. Seeing any human in that much pain is hard on a person though. When my grandmother was dying, she asked my mom if it was ok for her to go now. It was the day after she got to see my son's picture. He wasn't allowed in her room for fear of spreading what she had to him. (I can't remember what it was now but even we [the adults] had to go in with gowns, booties and a mask, toss them after wards and make sure to wash and sanitize) My mom cried when she heard gramma ask that, it was one of her last lucid moments. She was gone a couple of days later.

I don't think it's right or fair that euthansia is illegal. I think if it's set up properly that it could be a great benefit for those who are suffering.

This conversation has been closed to further comments

25 Comments

View replies by

Petra - posted on 10/04/2010

533

16

22

That's pretty much where I'm coming from, Tah - granting that power to anyone other than the patient themselves would make the line between murder and euthanasia a very blurry one. I used the elderly as an example to illustrate my point, but I completely agree that not all advanced age patients are of questionable or indeterminate soundness. From my standpoint, there are far too many variables for euthanasia to be simply a "yea" or "nay" issue. Morally, I support the right to decide for yourself that you'd like to be allowed, or even helped, to die. Legally, I think its too slippery a slope to open that door.

Tah - posted on 10/04/2010

7,412

22

400

my paper, and point of view is from that of the patient making the informed decision. If having a physician or any hmo or family member make the choice i would say no also. Legally that would never hold up in court. where would you draw the line between that and murder? I understand what you are saying, but all person's who want to die are not elderly and all elderly are not of questionable states of mind.

Sharon - posted on 10/04/2010

11,585

12

1315

yes.

1. dying in pain & agony with no mind left due to high quantities of drugs has NO DIGNITY.

2. Some people are and have been so miserable in their lives, they deserve an exit out. See ya.

Petra - posted on 10/04/2010

533

16

22

*** I am referring to conscious patients with some life expectancy - not "brain dead" examples where the only issue is to pull, or not to pull, the proverbial plug.

Petra - posted on 10/04/2010

533

16

22

In the instance of a request from a terminally ill patient of 100% sound mind - that is the ideal. At the family's (or when there is no family), the state's/government's/hospital's request? Absolutely not.

The problem with a lot of terminally ill or extremely elderly patients is that their soundness of mind is debatable - whether due to being constantly and heavily medicated or experiencing few to no periods of lucidity due to the nature of their ailment, a lot of people who would be deemed the best candidate for euthanasia are simply not able to make that decision for themselves.

For me, this is where euthanasia becomes dangerous. The decision should come only from the patient in the form of legal, explicit, informed consent. If anyone else, at all, is given the power to determine forced or assisted euthanasia candidacy, then it is not in the patient's best interest.

Tah - posted on 10/04/2010

7,412

22

400

There isn't really a challenge to it from me. I beleive that there should be rules attached to it absolutely. The person should be of sound mind and not on any mind altering drugs when the choice is made. Noone who would benefit from the death or who would keep the person around for selfish reasons, like just not wanting to say goodbye should be the deciding factor. A third and fourth party that are neutral should be involved. There can be a time limit to give them time to think and they can always change their minds. I have seen lots of patients in pain. Ones on morphine and other medications who have asked me to put them out of their misery when i come in to administer that medication. I have seen cancer patients and those with ALS and MS. I have seen cancer growing on the outside of peoples bodies, bleeding and having other kinds of drainage. Two of my patients tried to hang themselves with the light cords in their hospital beds. If it comes to that and them being helped to pass in a humane way and they have made the choice when of sound mind. I say yes.

Petra - posted on 10/04/2010

533

16

22

I've got to come down on the side of No.

Tah - I did a paper on this once in a philosophy class and was surprised that I would up against euthanasia. My reasons are strictly legal though, not moral.

The ideal situation, and the humanistic one, would be to grant someone the ultimate bodily autonomy to decide for themselves when their time is up. In the case of families with terminally ill relatives who are clearly suffering, it is really, really hard to make a case against euthanasia.

But in the case of someone terminally ill who has, say, 1 year to live, they are not of sound mind, and they have no extended family or relatives - euthanasia should not be an option. Nameless people in hospitals who can't make that decision for themselves can not have it made for them, IMO. If you open the door legally, there will be a huge fallout.

Its first thing in the morning for me, so I don't know if I worded that properly for my point to get across. Feel free to challenge - I may need some more prodding to flesh out my reasoning.

[deleted account]

My grandmother passed away not even an hour ago. We were not close we hadnt spoken fot he last 2 years but i know how much pain she was in and i think it should be a choice As she knew she was dieing for the past 4 years.

[deleted account]

I don't know. My first instinct is to say no.... and yes, it's because of my beliefs. All life is precious and God can and does perform miracles w/ that life all the time.

Then I remember spending the last 3 weeks of my Grandma's life w/ her as she died of cancer and I can fully understand why all the rest of you have said yes so far.

That's why I'm going w/ an 'I don't know' vote on this one.

ME - posted on 10/03/2010

2,978

18

193

yes...it should, tho, I think that it makes sense to have such things administered by doctors, and only under certain circumstances.

Serena - posted on 10/03/2010

453

10

55

Cancer runs in my family, and I would like to have that option if I needed it. I just pray that I will never have to helplessly watch someone suffer.

Stifler's - posted on 10/03/2010

15,141

154

604

I agree, why do dogs get euthanased and we let humans suffer and try to push more and more rounds of chemo and medications on them when they don't even want it.

Cassie - posted on 10/03/2010

0

0

182

In all seriousness, I do believe it should be an option but I think there have to be very rigid guidelines and processes in order before it can occur.

Dana - posted on 10/03/2010

11,264

35

495

I think that anyone with a terminal illness has a right to die when they want, with a proper psychological evaluation of course.

Kimberly - posted on 10/03/2010

705

59

52

'Yes' is my answer as well because I don't see how it is fair to keep someone alive for our own selfish reasons.

Heather - posted on 10/03/2010

389

17

18

I think it totally depends on the situation. I just think that it's such a broad range of reasons people want to die that you can't just grant everyone the right to die. Otherwise, someone who finds out they have terminal cancer, but still have a few years/months to live might decide to just end it(selfishly IMO), but then, if they're going to suffer a horrible, debilitating, excrutiating death...I also think they shouldn't have to go through that. There's no right answer to this one IMO.

Cassie - posted on 10/03/2010

0

0

182

We joke with my MIL that if she turns into her mother, my husband and I will have her euthanized. Does that count??

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms