Euthanasia, Agree or disagree??

Mother - posted on 03/25/2012 ( 41 moms have responded )

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Last week I heard a quickie broadcast that A province here in Canada might be revisiting the idea of euthanasia. I believe there has to be someone who is terminally ill and is requesting help to kill themselves.....what are your thoughts??



I asked my husband what he thought and he said if I was terminal or machines were keeping me alive.....have mercy on me and help me die. I'm of the same opinion. Why is it we will put an animal out of its misery but we make elderly or terminally ill people suffer?? I say, let me die with dignity and on my own terms.



http://www.globaltvbc.com/pages/story.as...

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[deleted account]

Elfrieda: Here is the problem with your objections and analogies: you are assuming that the person whose life is on the line doesn't have an opinion in the matter. That is not what we are talking about at all. It wouldn't have been your place to decide whether your Oma was treated: it was HER choice. My father, brother, and sister didn't decide not to have the chest tube inserted into my mom's lungs -- SHE DID. She refused treatment against all our wishes. Personally, if it had been my choice, I would have had the tubes re-inserted with the hope that she would make it a few more weeks in order to see my babies be born (I was 33 weeks pregnant at the time). But that wouldn't have been honoring HER wishes.



What if your Oma didn't want the surgery? And she had decided that she was going to refuse all treatment? And she is interviewed by psychologists, social workers and psychiatrists and determined to be competent to make that decision? Then what? Because that was the situation my mother faced. She refused life-sustaining treatment. However, that doesn't mean she just suddenly died. Absent an immediate crisis, even if you turn the "machines" off, it still takes time to die. Should you Oma have been forced to lay in a bed and slowly starve to death? Or lay there and slowly die from the gangrene that most likely would have eventually have set into her leg? At that point, if SHE has decided she wants to end her life, why shouldn't it be done quickly and mercifully in a way least likely to cause her any pain or suffering? Why, at the very end of life, should the medical profession be forced to abandon her?



With respect to your Oma, I'm sure the doctor's decision not to operate was out of concern that she wouldn't survive the surgery, not because they didn't see any value to her life. Doctors and nurses don't like seeing anyone die either.

[deleted account]

If anyone has any opposition to euthanisia, I would love for them to explain to me what possible benefit there was to my mother suffering the way she did, to my father suffering the way he did at her side, to her two pregnant daughters suffering the way we did at her side, to my brother suffering the way he did at her side, and to my grandmother, aunts, uncles, and other relatives who held our hands and cried with us during those long, seemingly endless time in which my mother slowly and painfully slipped away from this world.

Sal - posted on 03/25/2012

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I am pro but feel like the theory is good, humane and with honerable intent, but humans aren't always known to be good humane and honorable I do worry about it's application. Just like some people get a pet put down because they are in the way I worry that the eldery and the ill or disabled might be 'putdown' for greedy selfish reasons of family or just to fey them out of the way, and that scares me no end..

[deleted account]

I agree. I felt that way before my mother died of ovarian cancer and I feel even more strongly about it now. The way my mother died was the cruelest and most heartless situation ever. Cancer had spread to her lungs and fluid was filling her lungs. She knew her time was up and refused to have chest tubes inserted to drain her lungs. Basically, our entire family sat around my mother, surrounding her bed, watching her struggle to breathe for over 14 hours before she died. There was no chance she would survive the night; however, rather than being able to mercifully end her life, all the doctors could do was give her morphine for the pain. It was barbaric.



A year to the day after my mother died, my husband and I had to put a cat down. We were able to say over goodbyes and hug and cuddle him while the vet gave him the shot to end his life. I held him until he took his last breath. The whole thing lasted less than 15 minutes. No hours of struggling for air. No hours of drowning in your own bodily fluids. No panic from struggling to breathe. No anguish over hours and hours and hours by my husband and I at the mixed feelings of just wanting his suffering to end mixed with the horror of not wanting to lose him. Just feeling sleepy and going to sleep.



There is something really f-ed up with our society when we show more mercy and compassion towards a cat than we do towards a human being.

Stifler's - posted on 04/07/2012

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I have no idea why suicide is illegal. It's my body and I'll die if I want to.

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Mrs. - posted on 04/15/2012

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"Death brings sorrow whether it is quick and unexpected or slow."

Yes, it does afterward, to the people watching and living on. This is not about those people though, it is about the person dying.

"The majority of the people I've known in this situation have done exactly that, but none of them have asked me to cause their death and all have 'Died with Dignity' ;"

It is most likely, since you offer counselling which has a religious aspect to it, that this is true. It would sort of be like asking a priest to help you kill yourself...not the number one person to make this request to. Dignity is a vague word...it could mean different things to different people. I think 'suffering' might be better. Have you never seen anyone suffer endlessly when dying? Some people would prefer to end that suffering earlier than others and a lot of people agree that they should be able to do that as painlessly as possible. These are people who likely don't believe their suffering will win them a place in heaven, they just want it over with.

Sarah - posted on 04/14/2012

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I believe in Euthanasia and think that it should be legal (I know Oregon, USA; and in Sweden it is, I'm unsure if anywhere else). I believe quality of life is more important than quantity. After watching people suffer through their deaths and begging to be killed, I think most people would agree with me.

[deleted account]

I can only form an opinion from comments made by the people who contact me directly for counseling, and yes many do live in the Netherlands and I believe them when they say they are terrified to go to a hospital, particularly before or during holiday (high bed demand) periods. I'm not saying the people who've posted otherwise are incorrect I'm merely pointing out that there are many many people living in the Netherlands and these people cannot possibly know everyone, or every single case there, neither can I and I make no such claims.



Secondly I've been around many, many people who've been classed as 'terminal', I'm the last survivng member of the 'cancer support group' which I joined over 15 years ago. I've sat with many of my friends as they drew their last breath and each one died with dignity, despite most needing round the clock nursing at the end. The old catch phrase 'Die with dignity'....what does that mean??? Death brings sorrow whether it is quick and unexpected or slow...I'm grateful that I've had time to do my best to contact those who I may have wronged in the past, to do my best to make amends, those who die unexpectedly don't have that advantage. My children at first insisted putting their lives on hold, but I urged them to continue living it to the fullest just as I now live mine. Sure, there are people who say I'm not as ill as I make out, even amongst doctors etc, but I can't help that, they don't see me on my 'bad' days when even breathing causes me distress. They don't see me because I don't wish them to see me; I can make that choice but there are some in hospices etc that can't make that choice, but if you asked they'd likely tell you that they don't expect you to 'wait on them to die' either. The majority of the people I've known in this situation have done exactly that, but none of them have asked me to cause their death and all have 'Died with Dignity' ; euthanasia does not ensure that death will be dignified...after all, when someone is unconscious one can still be suffering, just because one cannot show it doesn't mean it's not happening....

Jennifer - posted on 04/05/2012

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If it was me, I'd want it done for me. I would NOT want to live like that, nor would I want my husband or kids to feel 'tied to that hospital bed'. I know people who waited to live while staying true to a family member, and that is sad.



I also have some fears about it though. Who decides if someone who hasn't left directions or never had the ability to let their wishes be known dies? My students with cerbal palsy live with incredible pain, daily, and I doubt I could or would want to live that way, but they can't make that choice. They do seem to enjoy life, and their smiles and giggles are worth the whole world to me. We also have a student who never responds to anything. We honestly can't say what she feels or even if she thinks, in 4 years, she has not smiled. My little man with traumatic brain injury lives with so much frustration. He can't do things he use to do, it takes him forever to even form a sentence, and he's hit and bit himself in terrible frustration about not being able to do things. They say he remembers how he was before the accident.........It may be selfish, but he brings us so much joy, I could never do it, even if it is what he would want!



I think it is a bit of a slippery slope. If we make euthanisia a realty today, and our children and grandchildren grow use to it, what will they decide is ok in the future.........I know that right now we are just talking about consenting adults making their own choice, and I am all for that, but we are not that far removed from the eugenitics era, and I worry that some people will try to decide what is best for society, not based on compassion, but on solely selfish and logical reasons.

Mrs. - posted on 04/04/2012

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I'm sorry for your loss, my aunt is going through a similar disease right now, in Germany. I'm glad he had the choice and that his needs were met at the end.



I suspected the whole "scared to go to the hospital" thing in the Netherlands might be a hyped up thing or a small group of people. Thank you for clarifying with your own experience living inside the country.

Anna - posted on 04/04/2012

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i live in the Netherlands and after having recently experianced euthanasia within the family, i am more than thankful that it is an option here! my partners nephew was diagnosed with ALS and within three years he went from a normal, healthy 33yr old to laying flat on a hospital style bed. unable to move, swallow, breath, talk...the only thing he could do for himself was blink and still his brain worked perfectly! he had a computer that he could "talk" with using his eyes, but that took a lot of energy. he kept getting lung infections and being rushed into hospital...it was going to happen sooner or later. it was just a waiting game. the last months he had started having pain in his feet and legs due to the way in which they have seized and he was able to decide that he didnt want to carry on living like that. though im sure it wasnt an easy choice...atleast it was available.

i do believe it should only be for the terminally ill or for those living in a state that is unlivable and if they are deciding themselves they should be evaluated to make sure they know what they are deciding to do. when a family member is deciding there should also be guidlines for 'aproval' as such. doctors should not be able to do it just to free up a bed... i have never heard of people being scared to go to hospital. because they took up beds otherwise needed, but maybe thats just not publicized here.

i have always been pro euthanasia and this has just enforced it!

Heidianne - posted on 03/31/2012

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I agree!! it is a big controversy here in Vermont. I am all for the Right To Die with dignity. Being in the health care field for over 15 years I would much rather go see a client that is "sleeping" than one that has taken matters into their own hands with a gun or other bloody manners.

Jodi - posted on 03/29/2012

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If i'm terminally ill and in pain and miserable, help me die. If I'm on life support and have little to no chance of regaining consciousness, let me die. I believe in euthanasia under the right circumstances. I do not believe in just offing the elderly or the terminally ill, there have to severe enough circumstances to warrant it.

Joy - posted on 03/29/2012

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"Agree with you 100%. Let's treat humans at least as compassionately as we treat animals. This seems like a no-brainer to me, but lots of people have serious phobias/issues surrounding death. They can't even talk about it, let alone take action toward it. Sad for the ones who forced to suffer because of it. :-("



Couldn't have said this better then Tracie did!

Nina - posted on 03/28/2012

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I live in Oregon, and voters here passed an assisted suicide law many years ago for terminally ill patients. There are a lot of hoops to jump through to get the prescription drug mixture that is required, and it must be self-administered. It really isn't a big issue and it is very private, and not common.. To those of you moms who are worried about what would happen in a terrible emergency, and have not done so, download and fill out an Advance Directive. Tell someone your wishes, and let them know where you keep your AD and not locked up. Please also consider becoming an organ donor, your gift could save many lives.

Tracie - posted on 03/28/2012

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Agree with you 100%. Let's treat humans at least as compassionately as we treat animals. This seems like a no-brainer to me, but lots of people have serious phobias/issues surrounding death. They can't even talk about it, let alone take action toward it. Sad for the ones who forced to suffer because of it. :-(

Mrs. - posted on 03/28/2012

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Margaret, I'm sorry some of your friends who live there feel that way, but it seems that is not how everyone in The Netherlands feels. I too, have friends and relatives there and have been lucky enough to spend some time there. This is not the impression I got, nor is it the impression that you get from reading about their policies.



Fear is often reality when you are very sick, but that doesn't mean those individual fears hold true to the entire policy and nation. It seems there is quite a bit of work that goes into making the personal decision to end it all in Holland. I can understand why they might be scared though, as I said, there is a lot of fear-mongering going around lately in conservative camps about the issue.



I mean, why aren't they scared to be at home too if the medical community is just offing people because they are a burden? They have mobile units now that go to homes in the Netherlands, if they wish to die at home (as so many people do). http://ibnlive.in.com/news/mobile-euthan...



Again, like Mother Bacher said, no one here is suggesting that people just off the old and sick against their will. They are just saying the power of having the choice would be a great option to have.



I, for one, don't think this will ever happen in Puritan America, too many religious folks will muddy the issue with God. I could, though, see it happen in Canada. I mean, hell, they just legalized brothels.

Mother - posted on 03/28/2012

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Margaret, no one else is going to make that decision but YOU unless you're completely unresponsive and machines are keeping you alive. This is so people can make the decision for themselves to die with dignity. You aren't going to have a bunch of people just deciding who to off. Although, if that were to happen......I HAVE A LIST!!! LOLOLOL You could also put a provision into your affairs that you be kept a live. That would be unusual but I'm sure it can be done. Most people put provisions in to pull the plug not the other way around.

[deleted account]

Yes, Rebecca, my ancestry is British, and no, I did not get this information from Rick Santorum, whoever he is...



I got it from many people I know personally in the Netherlands, and their friends and relatives, who are terrified to enter hospitals, especially during 'busy' seasons, because they fear that someone who doesn't even know them will decide that their bed could be better used, or that they're a 'waste of space'.

Mrs. - posted on 03/27/2012

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"My fear if 'voluntary euthanasia' is accepted is that our countries will become as the Netherlands is now. That is, that the ill or permanently disabled are loath to enter hospital because of the fear that someone will decide their life is pointless and they're better off dead; or perhaps the bed is needed, and they're just taking up space; the patient's wishes are over ridden because they're in the way."



I'm guessing by your post that you are British, so I'm hoping you didn't get this information from listening to Rick Santorum?



The Netherlands' system is not perfect, none of them are. If everyone who is ill or permanently disabled in The Netherlands is deathly afraid of the hospitals because of this policy, why was there a big push by citizens 70 and over in 2010 to extend this practice to those who simple want the option and aren't deathly ill? I think there has been a huge amount of fear-mongering about The Netherlands and their policies concerning euthanasia by the conservative communities across the North America and the UK.



Again, your story is an awesome story of survival and going beyond your illness (and not unlike my own struggle to deal with a chronic illness and get on with my life despite it all), but no one is suggesting that we support the killing of people who are a burden against their will. As I'm sure you know, there are a lot of different people in the disabled and chronic illness communities and many of those people have different ideas on what they want out of life/how they want to deal with their suffering. I think the main thing that all can agree on is that they want whatever little they can control, remain in their control. You wished to keep on going with the provisions you outlined and you are lucky that those provisions are within the law and that they are supported by the medical community. I think it is important to give the same options to everyone else, to have their own provisions and to have it be respected by the law, their families and their docs.



My aunt is dying over in Germany and has been since Christmas. Her wishes were very similar to yours and she to, is involved in organized religion. She is suffering horribly, can't speak and was abused by her caregivers (a church that took most of her money)...but she still wants to go on. I respect her choices, though I don't know that I would choose the same. What most people that support the choice to end their lives humanely want, is to have the same respect.

**Jackie** - posted on 03/27/2012

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I told my husband that should it happen, please don't waste your money on me if I'm a vegetable. He told me he is almost 100% sure he couldn't "unhook" me and let me die and I informed him of our financial state. We, in America, are viewed as upper class. Funny thing is...we live paycheck to paycheck like everyone else so I would rather our money go to our children then to me if there is no chance for me. Would it be hard? Yes. Would I want my precious angels coming and seeing mommy like that every day? No way. I'd rather daddy tell them that mommy went back home to heaven and that I am forever in their hearts...not laying in a hospital bed with tubes.

[deleted account]

I was classified as 'terminally ill' over 17 years ago, and given 6 months at the most to live. My initial reaction was 'well that's it then'...but then something happened and I discovered that just because the doctor's all agreed I was going to die, didn't mean it was a surety. Now all these years later, I still live independently even though disability continues to encroach on my life. Not only that but I've been awarded several scholarships and this year hope to complete my Doctorate of Theology.



I've left instructions, should I become too unwell to make my own decisions, that I don't want to be hooked up to machines to keep me breathing or my heart beating etc, HOWEVER, I don't wish to be 'euthanised' and I must be given food and water, if these functions continue until the point that they stop of their own accord. Yes, even though I'm in constant, largely unrelieved pain, and can rest no more than 30 minutes at a time before pain awakens me, I don't wish for someone to decide my life is worthless and to kill me...why???? because I have too much to live for.



During these past few years, my grandchildren have been born, and I've been able to sit with several young girls as they give birth to their precious bundles, acting firstly as birth coach and then later helping them learn how to become mothers. I've counseled many people in all stages of life, and offered a listening ear to the street folk. I've learned that street folk don't need to be 'fixed' as so many social workers think...they need to be heard and accepted. There are actually 3 different groups living on the streets of most 'wealthy' Western countries. There are the street folk, who have chosen to 'live rough', there are those who live in hostels or the much rarer private hotels (rooming houses), and then there are the homeless, usually families whose homes have been reclaimed by the banks because of default in loans. Each group has their own special needs but unfortunately too many lump them all together and think they can be dealt with as a whole.



I feel sad when people tell me how they feel 'useless and unwanted' when they are in the process of dying. Unlike animals, we are capable of adjusting to our circumstances, whereas animals are creatures of instinct etc. Sure there are days when pain almost overwhelms me, but I have learnt to manage those days, distracting myself on the computer when I am too unwell to go outside and minister on the streets. Yes pain management is hard when one is allergic to morphine, codeine and their derivatives, but there are new discoveries every week it seems, and I am fortunate that Tramal was developed and is on the NHS.



My fear if 'voluntary euthanasia' is accepted is that our countries will become as the Netherlands is now. That is, that the ill or permanently disabled are loath to enter hospital because of the fear that someone will decide their life is pointless and they're better off dead; or perhaps the bed is needed, and they're just taking up space; the patient's wishes are over ridden because they're in the way.



So, whilst I'm not at all afraid of death, I am determined to live until I take my last breath, when it happens in God's time, not because someone else thinks I'd be better off dead, or perhaps they figure it would be more convenient if I died so that someone didn't have to return for the funeral.



God bless.

Christina - posted on 03/26/2012

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i think it should be the patients choice. my parents have both already told me no machines. that would be hard enough of a choice for me as it is and no i wouldnt want to kill them for the fact they were miserable,, but if thats what someone wants then it is what it is.

[deleted account]

what dignity we give to animals in death is only for those that have loving owners and is surely made up for by lack thereof in other areas of our treatment of them.

Amanda - posted on 03/26/2012

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I agree! I have always wondered why we put down an animal who is ill or hurt, but we froce people of right mind to live. Truely does not make sense at all.

Corinne - posted on 03/26/2012

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Thanks Tracey, I wasn't actually aware of that. Thing is, why on earth do they need to do a study? We can abort an unborn child that may or may not suffer if it were born, we can end an animals life if it is seriously sick or dying, why can't we choose to end our own lives in a pain free, dignified way?

Tracey - posted on 03/26/2012

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I beleive that in UK there is a study happening now about whether terminally ill people with less than 6 months to live should be able to kill themselves.

Corinne - posted on 03/26/2012

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I agree with euthanasia and wish the U.K would bring it in. Three of my Grandparents died slow, painful deaths from various forms of cancer and I would not wish that kind of agony on anybody. To watch my Nanna, at 66yrs old begging for someone to kill her was the worst thing I've ever seen and heard.

Tina - posted on 03/25/2012

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I am both for and against it. If someone has a serious disease that makes living unbearable then I could understand wanting to end it. But on the other hand it is unfair it would be cruel to expect someone to do the deed for you like a doctor or someone because they will have to live with it forever. In some cases there is no choice but would certainly be hard to do.

Kate CP - posted on 03/25/2012

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This may sound really weird but...as a rescue worker and someone who works closely with animals I have seen the fear and pain in their eyes. The gift of giving them peace and no pain is priceless. As long as they go with some one there who loves them I think euthanasia is humane and necessary for humans and animals. Yes, I am in favor of highly regulated euthanasia or assisted suicide.

Mrs. - posted on 03/25/2012

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Elfrieda...it's not that easy as you outline in the last paragraph. Let's say the person could actually do it themselves, which most people in the position can't, who is to say that they will administer correctly? Who is to say that it might make the whole thing worse? Not to mention, if a loved one does it, they can end up being charged.



Besides, I'm not really sure how, what you described in the last paragraph, is any different morally than it being allowed by law as far as people taking advantage of it and knocking off their parents because they are a burden. Wouldn't it be better for it to be out in the open? Wouldn't there be less room for people to off their loved ones because they are sick of caring for them?



I could counter your story with one that didn't end up so well with a grandmother. My husband's grandmother was sick, both mentally and physically. She had bad diabetes and refused to change her diet or anything. Needless to say, she started to have big health problems which included amputation. She was miserable and her sick husband had to care for her. She wanted to end it all, but everyone would just pat her hand and tell her it was going to be okay. One day, her husband found her ODing on her meds, she swallowed as many as she figured out could, as the docs said, be lethal. Unfortunately, she didn't die right away. She suffered badly, lived for a week in an extreme amount of pain, then her heart gave out from all the damage from the suicide attempt.



When someone wants to end it...give them a dignified, proven way to do so.

Elfrieda - posted on 03/25/2012

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I'm totally against it, not because I think it's so great to be hooked up to machines and have all your suffering prolonged, but just because I think it's a bad idea to make "putting people down" a valid option.



I know people hate "slippery slope" arguments, but I'm going there.



This is how it already is: there isn't much value assigned to an old person who still has lots of fight left in her, but she's broken her hip and the doctors don't see the point of hurrying her to surgery and physical therapy because she's going to die anyway.

That was my Oma. She was 89, fell and broke her hip. She was left in the hospital for 3 days before they did anything, partly because she was too weak for surgery, but I think partly because she was old, and they didn't expect her to survive anyway. She has 6 sons, 4 of whom live in the area, and many grandchildren and daughters-in-law who love her. We were in and out of that hospital constantly, not just to support her, but also to show the nurses and doctors that she has value, she is important to us. I think that (and my uncle Pete stomping around making waves as he does so well) made a huge difference in the level of care she received. She got the surgery, she did the physical therapy, and for her 90th birthday she was presented with a personalized bowling ball so that she can be the flashiest member of her weekly bowling group!

It's true that she might not live for many more years, but she's living now.



I worry what would have happened if her sons had been less confident, and if euthanasia was a common and accepted practice. She looked pretty bad there for a few weeks. She even said that she would like to die and go to heaven where she could be at peace. It was hard. Should we have killed her? Put her down? I feel so horrified even writing that. And would she have felt obligated to kill herself because she was putting everyone to so much work? It was inconvenient to visit in the hospital, and it was inconvenient to take turns constantly having someone stay at her house in the early days after she got home to help her and make sure she was okay. She doesn't like being a bother. She might have opted for it just to make our lives easier!



At the same time, my heart breaks for those people who truly believe that for their loved ones, life is over but the body keeps going. Certainly I don't want to be hooked up to a machine in order to live. I think a really imperfect solution would be to continue to have it be illegal, but the consequences for the person who did it would be much smaller. I can't remember when, but Robert Latimer killed his 12-year-old a few years ago by filling the cab of his truck with carbon monoxide. She was in constant pain and he thought it was best to let her go as gently as possible. I think he went to prison for 20 years or something. I think he should have gotten one year, or some more compassionate sentence.



And if someone is dying, couldn't a doctor say, "Here's how to administer the pain medication. Give as much as needed. Just be aware that levels over whatever number are lethal." I think that should be allowed, but not something along the lines of "Here's a shot to kill you."

Mrs. - posted on 03/25/2012

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I think it should be available, not just for terminally ill people, but for handicapped or chronically ill people who make a choice to no longer continue living. Now I know the later part of that is one that some people may not agree with, but I've spent way too much time in chronic pain groups with people who live their lives with no relief and no end in sight - I think they should be given the choice.



I think this is backed up by endless cases like Christina Symanski, a handicapped woman who recently starved herself to death to find an end to her suffering. Starving yourself to death is in no way humane...all people like her are asking for is a peaceful end to unbelievable suffering.



If you are not familiar with the story, here's a link:



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/02/15...

[deleted account]

I am completely pro-Euthanasia under a variety of circumstances. It will never be perfect but you can't tell me that it isn't necessary sometimes.

[deleted account]

i would never want to be left hooked up to a bunch of machines when my mind is already gone for whatever reason, be it brain damage or insanity or whatever mortal wound i may carry. my husband already knows this. if it's my time, it's my time. i don't want petty humans making decisions about when i am going to die. i'll do it on my own terms or whenever whatever powers that be decide i'm done in this world.



so i agree. fight for life until it's no longer possible, sure, but if the person doesn't want to fight anymore so be it.

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 03/25/2012

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You're right Rebecaa, there is absolutely NO explaination. It is cruel. It is heartless. Anyone that says otherwise, has not been through it themselves and I bet they would be the first to change their mind when in the terrible situation of watching a loved one suffer.



I have been there too and it was the most devastating, painful, cruel situation I have ever been in. The feeling of helplessness and utter heartbreak. I truly hope I never have to be a part of it again.



If I end up in that position myself (me on the bed), I am pulling the f'en plug myself!

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 03/25/2012

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I say agree.



If someone is suffering and there is no hope for any quality of life, give them their wishes. For crying out loud who are they living for? They are not living for themselves. Take some heart and allow them to be at peace.



I would never want to suffer. That is a terrible thought. I couldn't imagine being in pain or ill every single waking moment, or having to take an excessive amount of drugs that still did not provide me with sanity. Living on machines just to keep me alive. No way, that is NOT life.



Nope, I say anyone should be able to make this decision for themselves. Those that cannot, their most loved ones should be able to make the call.

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