gas for guns

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Rosie - posted on 10/12/2010

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i am sara!! although i'm not too sure that me saying we need a war on poverty, instead of a war on drugs would make me a hero in the south, or really anywhere for that matter in the united states, lol!! i just don't see how our legal system cannot see how poverty relates to almost EVERY facet of criminology in this country. statistics prove over and over again, that the poorer people are the ones involved in crimes, from drugs, to homicide. get rid of the poverty and there wouldn't be any need for these people do do what theyre doing. it completely boggles my mind, how simple it is, yet how hard it is to get across to the public.
and i would LOVE to live in louisiana for a while actually!! i'd like to experience some southern hospitality, hehe!! no crawfish sucking though!! ;)

Rosie - posted on 10/12/2010

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heres some info about previous buy back policies that we've tried before.

Gun "buy-back" programs are a strategy aimed at influencing the firearms market by taking guns "off the streets".[90] Gun "buy-back" programs have been shown to be ineffective,[138][139] with the National Academy of Sciences citing theory underlying these programs as "badly flawed."[90] Guns surrendered tend to be those least likely to be involved in crime, such as old, malfunctioning guns with little resale value, muzzleloading or other blackpowder guns, antiques chambered for obsolete cartridges that are no longer commercially manufactured or sold, or guns that individuals inherit but have little value in possessing.[140] Other limitations of gun "buy-back" programs include the fact that it is relatively easy to obtain gun replacements, often of better guns than were relinquished in the "buy-back."[90] Also, the number of handguns used in crime (approximately 7,500 per year) is very small compared to the approximately 70 million handguns in the United States (i.e., 0.011%).[90]



"Gun Bounty" programs launched in several Florida cities have shown more promise. These programs involve cash rewards for anonymous tips about illegal weapons that leads to an arrest and a weapons charge. Since its inception May 2007, the Miami program led to 264 arrests, confiscation of 432 guns owned illegally and $2.2 million in drugs, as well as solved several murder and burglary cases.[141]





i am very much for programs that would work to help keep guns off the streets, and out of the hands of criminals, but i really dont think based off of previous tried that this would work. i like the idea that miami has, giving money to people that narc. i think it would be money better spent.

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[deleted account]

pinch the tails, suck the heads....c'est si bon!

And I know what you mean. I used to volunteer weekly in about 6 projects in Baton Rouge. My uncle basically said that he didn't know why I was wasting my time on those blankety blanks all they do is shoot each other and sell drugs. I said that's WHY I'm wasting my time on them, so maybe the cycle will stop with these little kids. They need some loving, food, help with homework, HOPE of a better life.

[deleted account]

Didn't I see somewhere that you were interested in pursuing a career in criminal justice? Kati, you'd love my town. Come down here, live in my town where it's safe, and fix the city!

Rosie - posted on 10/12/2010

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it looks good in theory, but apparantly they havn't had much success. i am a huge anti-gun person, so i think it's good to get the guns off the streets, but seriously the guns that are used in crimes aren't the ones that are going to be surrendered. most of those guns are illegal, and i dont' think anybody is going to just walk up and hand over an illegal firearm without fear of reprocussion.

i still think education, and a war on poverty (tupacs famous words, lol) are what is needed. here's some more stats:

During the 1980s and early 1990s, homicide rates surged in cities across the United States (see graphs at right).[20] Handgun homicides accounted for nearly all of the overall increase in the homicide rate, from 1985 to 1993, while homicide rates involving other weapons declined during that time frame.[21] The rising trend in homicide rates during the 1980s and early 1990s was most pronounced among youths and Hispanic and African American males in the United States, with the injury and death rates tripling for black males aged 13 through 17 and doubling for black males aged 18 through 24.[11][17] The rise in crack cocaine use in cities across the United States is often cited as a factor for increased gun violence among youths during this time period.[22][23][24]



Homicide rates in the United States are two to four times higher than they are in countries that are economically and politically similar to it. Higher rates are found in developing countries and those with political instability.[21][25][26]



Prevalence of homicide and violent crime is greatest in urban areas of the United States. In metropolitan areas, the homicide rate in 2005 was 6.1 per 100,000 compared with 3.5 in non-metropolitan counties.[27] In U.S. cities with populations greater than 250,000, the mean homicide rate was 12.1 per 100,000.[28] Rates of gun-related homicides are greatest in southern and western states



there's also more. the most LEGAL guns are in rural areas, which have much less homicide by gun. but more suicide by gun (suicide rates are still the same as other areas, they just use more guns when they are in the house). theres more, but i won't make you read a thousand page post, i'll just post the link, lol!! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gun_violenc...

[deleted account]

Thank you Kati. That is the info I was looking for. And that is what I suspected would happen.



At this point I think the BRPD is so desperate because they have such a bad rep. Like I said, crime is high. But their hands are tied because voters keep turning down proposed taxes to improve the department.



Something that HAS worked and is fairly inexpensive is a bike patrol. There is one particular neighborhood known for gang and gun violence. The department started a bike patrol in the area and the officers are getting to know the people, especially the kids. They are building a relationship of trust with this particular community. Because of their constant presence and familiarity, it seems that violence in that area has decreased.



But then again, in the past month, there has been two senseless murders of people not involved, in any way, with drugs or gang activity. One was a teenage boy out on the weekend caught in the crossfire between two gangs. The other was a mother in her own home getting ready to bring her daughter to school. The daughter was also shot, but survived. There was a gun threat at the mall too. It was evacuated and no one was hurt. I think the department is just searching for ways to get on our good sides again after all this.



By the way, I don't live IN Baton Rouge. I'm in the same parish (county, Louisiana has parishes), but my little town is actually very safe, thank goodness!

Stifler's - posted on 10/12/2010

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That's what my granddad did when we had gun crushing, kept one in the roof. No one got any money for it though.

[deleted account]

I'm so on the fence. I worry about people obtaining guns illegally in order to exchange for the gas card. Less worrisome is people turning in broken guns for the gas cards. I don't know how many truly dangerous guns are going to be off the streets.

I tried doing some research to see if similar programs were successful elsewhere. I couldn't find much information.

But where I'm sitting, something NEEDS to be done about the crime rate in Baton Rouge. It's out of control and it's been that way for a long time. I'm glad they are trying something new (to us anyway) but I'm skeptical.

I'm going to wait and see what the outcome is before forming an opinion.

Tracey - posted on 10/12/2010

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Does anyone honestly believe a criminal who hands in a gun used in a crime thinking he is getting rid of the evidence will not get another gun 5 minutes later?

Stifler's - posted on 10/11/2010

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In Aus guns are banned, there are serious fines if you're caught with one without a license and not properly stored like gun in front and bullets in the boot or a safe.

JuLeah - posted on 10/11/2010

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I think it is great! We won't get the guns out of the hands of folks who carry them in their daily life (dealers and such) but we might get them out of the hands of the dingbat who bought a gun for 'home defence' but has not yet shot his wife or kid by mistake.

Rosie - posted on 10/11/2010

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i don't think it will work, in theory it looks good, but previous programs havn't reduced violent crimes with guns. why? because the criminals KEEP their guns. the people that aren't criminals are the ones benefiting from this, which is all nice, but doesn't really do anything to help with crime.

Cassie - posted on 10/11/2010

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I support it 100%. As the wife of a police officer, I am afraid every night when my husband leaves for work. Any program that will remove guns from the streets and the hands of criminals is good in my book.

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