Having guns in your home.

Sarah - posted on 06/18/2010 ( 228 moms have responded )

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So I know we've debated guns a few times, but there's a specific question I have to those of you that own guns and keep them in your homes.

The main reason a lot of people seem to keep guns in their homes is for protection.
In the same breath though, they say that for the safety of their kids, the guns are locked away. They often say that they are kept unloaded, and the ammunition is kept locked away elsewhere to prevent the kids being able to get hold of them.

So how, in the event of an intruder, are you supposed to get the gun from wherever it's locked safely away, load it, and apprehend the intruder before said intruder robs you or shoots YOU or whatever they have in mind????

If your gun is NOT locked away, and is perhaps loaded then don't you worry about your kids getting hold of it? I know people will say that there's always places to hide it where the kids will never find it, but kids can and do find ways!

Here in the UK, we just don't have the same relationship with guns as say, America, so I guess I've never understood it. If I had my way, ALL guns would be banned.

Your thoughts? On my specific question and guns in general.
:)

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Ez - posted on 06/20/2010

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Ava I think you need to research the decrease in gun-related crime here after our gun laws were amended. It has kept guns off the streets. Our statistics say so.

The following is from a study by the New South Wales Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research. In 2006, the total number of criminal incidents involving a firearm in NSW was 44% lower than when it peaked in 1997. Shooting incidents (i.e. recorded incidents of shoot with intent) have fallen by 40 per cent. Robberies with a firearm have shown the most spectacular decline. The incidence of this offence peaked in 1997, when police recorded over 1,200 offences. Last year, NSW Police recorded fewer than 500 robberies involving firearms.

Also, the argument that a tightening of legislation wouldn't make the 'bad guys' give up their guns is just not accurate. More than 80% of the guns surrendered in the amnesty and Australian government Buyback scheme in the mid-90s had not been legally purchased or registered. The black market already existed, but the monetary incentive for surrendering the weapons was enough to get the vast majority off the street.

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Good grief! I don't believe anyone was mocking Americans for their familiarity with weapons, but more that they are fascinated with the cultural difference and the notion of having a gun in the house for 'protection', when the reality is that it's more likely to be the cause of a higher level of violence... possibly resulting in death.

I am also familiar with guns, being an American military brat having grown up in the Northwest and then moving to the big, bad city (Los Angeles)... before leaving the country and finding myself becoming an Australian citizen.

My father had guns. Rifles and a shotgun for hunting and a handgun for 'protection'. The hunting rifles were kept in a soft case in a hall closet, unloaded. He bought ammo when he'd go hunting. The handgun was kept in an unlocked lock box on the top shelf of his closet, loaded. I discovered the handgun's location by accident when I was about 6, but never told anyone that I'd found it, nor did I touch it. When we moved to LA, my father still kept the handgun and continued to keep it loaded. My step-mother never liked having a gun around, but she was never strong enough to stand up to my father. One afternoon, she came screaming down the hall to get me. My father had his gun and was going to shoot one of her relatives who was visiting, or at least that's what he'd told her. She wanted me to go talk him out of it. I went into their bedroom to find that he was off his nut and there was no talking sense. I stood in his way, he pointed the loaded gun at my head and told me to move.... I dared him to shoot me. He very nearly did, but between my look of disbelief and my step mother's screams, something brought him around and he lowered the gun.

He was a Vietnam Vet with untreated PTSD, so would have flashbacks every so often, especially when he drank. If there were no gun in the house, that whole situation never would have happened. He may have gone out and beaten the guy up, but at least the man would have had a chance to run away... not to mention I wouldn't have had to get involved.

LA is terrible for guns. I know of a place to buy a 'clean' Glock for $50 (well, it was fifty 11 years ago), used to hear gunfire every night... so much so that I ended up being able to identify what type of gun and the distance away and heard of far too many innocent people (mostly children) being killed in drive by shootings. A good friend of mine was kidnapped at gunpoint not far from work. She was going through the drive-thru at Carl's Jr (fast food place) when a guy got into the passenger side and told her to drive off. He took her across town and held her captive for 3 days, repeatedly raping her while holding a gun to her head. When he'd had enough, he drove her to another part of the city (in her car) and dumped her out. Another friend's father was shot in the head in a car jacking and died.

There are guns still in Australia, but as someone stated they are primarily used as a tool to keep pests at bay. I know quite a few people who have rifles and such, but they are all kept in special gun safes, unloaded. In fact, the ammo is kept in a separate area, so the guns are not used for 'protection'. Of course there are criminals who have guns, but they only target other criminals... and you still never hear of people being shot to death very often.

The whole "right to bear arms" is such an antiquated notion, it really should be reviewed and dissolved because it is no longer relevant. It was meant for protecting one's property/family during the Revolutionary War era. There were no police or armed forces at the time, so a man had to protect his own family and possessions, as well as possibly help defend the country.

From what I understand, the way the Aussies got guns off the streets is to change the laws, as well as do gun buybacks. They actually pay per gun. I'm so glad to be living in a country with strict gun control laws, because we don't have to be on yellow alert all the time and feel unsafe. More importantly, my children won't have to deal with the level of violence handguns bring with them.

Being street smart will give you more protection than a gun ever could.

Ez - posted on 06/20/2010

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Oh crap... so much for multi-tasking! That will teach me to try to read emails and post while talking on the phone lol.

But I will address the difference so many of us have mentioned between the UK and Australia and the US regarding guns. It most certainly appears to be a completely difference mentality.

I have never once heard an Aussie gushing over the aesthetics of a gun, We don't see them as attractive, alluring or cool, To us, they are nothing more than tools to keep pests under control and euthanise animals on properties/farms.

This is very different to how many Americans view them. I have seen people calling them 'beautiful', 'fun' and someone else called one 'handsome' in this very thread. This makes absolutely no sense to me, and, I'm assuming, the other Aussies and Brits here. That's why it seems like a fascination.

Charlie - posted on 06/19/2010

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Look Aussies and brits will never agree with Pro gun Americans , we just dont have that NEED or relationship with guns as you all do , its unnecessary to us , the stats clearly show how dangerous even owning one is ,5,285 children die in the United States every year by gunshot , Every day more than 80 Americans die from gun violence, The rate of firearm deaths among kids under age 15 is almost 12 times higher in the United States than in 25 other industrialized countries combined. those numbers just seem insane to us .



we dont need guns here to protect ourselves because we dont have other gun crazed people to worry about , the whole knives debate is not really relateable , first off the chance of being killed with a knife is FAR less than with a gun , anything can become a weapon , you can kill a man with a toothpick , no joke its happened and just about as likely as being attacked by secret ninja style knife throwers LOL , ive heard of a person being held up with a biro !!



Anyhoo........Im glad we have strict gun laws .

Joanna - posted on 06/18/2010

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I would love to own a gun for protection, especially here in Orange County, CA, where crime/breakins/burglaries, etc, are so frequent. I just couldn't stand the thought of having one in the house with my very curious daughter. I would rather be killed in a break-in then witness my child shoot herself.

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LaCi - posted on 06/24/2010

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Indiana has a very strong gun culture. They won't be turning anything in. OH man, I can't even imagine trying to take guns away from those western KY guys. Strong gun culture and very strong militia lovin throughout western KY.



There are a lot of ways to climb a fridge. pull a chair over, climb the inside to get to the top, etc. There aren't many ways for a toddler to pick a lock or climb to the top of my closet, there has to be something to climb to manage to climb . Like I said, if it happens I'll eat my words. *And he'd have to manage to do all this without me noticing...



I always knew where my fathers gun was, he told me. Said it was for emeergencies only and not to mess with, and I never even went to look at it. I also never wen't snooping in my parents room because I knew I wasn't supposed to, I was extremely well behaved. A loaded gun COULD have been left right in front of me and I wouldn't have touched it. All things depend on circumstance, all children are different.

Jodi - posted on 06/24/2010

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I am only just catching up with this thread, and probably won't today, but I just have to say, if mothers of toddlers are having difficulties getting them to potty train and do as they are told, can someone please enlighten me as to HOW you are going to teach them about safety with guns? They don't have the capability at that age of logical thinking.



Tanya, if you had been 3 or 4 the outcome may have been VERY different. 6 is an age where some children DO begin to think more clearly (average age of logical thinking is 7-8). Laura absolutely has a point about safety of medications and guns. If your kid can get to the gun, it is unsafe. Period. You may not THINK they can get to it, but if it is sitting ANYWHERE loaded, never underestimate a toddler.

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I know we will never agree on this Laci, our differences are cultural as a Brit I don't think I will ever understand your desire to have guns for protection (that being said I don't understand the use of any weapon for protection) as I have said I truely hope you never have to put this into action. :-)

You may have been ok when you found your dad's gun Tanya but what about the ones that aren't - if stricter laws can save one life they are worth it. Yes it may take generations before some people in the states you mentioned give up their guns but eventually the majority could be handed in. No one is suggesting changing laws overnight because that is a ludicrous idea and would never work.

Tanya - posted on 06/24/2010

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As I have said before I did find my fathers loaded hand gun when I was six. I held it without my finger on the trigger and then put it back. He had let me shoot it before and I knew it was not a toy.

As for shooting in stress it depends on the person. Some people shoot better and other shoot worse.

As for turning in guns I don't think anyone in Ky, WV, VA, NC, SC, GA, or the rest of the south east would turn them in . Now way. These people have been talking about how the government is going to take their guns for years. I know plenty of people who have stocked up on guns just in case this happened.

Isobel - posted on 06/24/2010

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my boyfriend held a loaded gun when he was a small child...and pointed at his face...thankfully didn't shoot it but...The man who owned it was POSITIVE that not only did his son not know where the gun was but also that he couldn't get to it in his locked desk...

kids are sneaky bastards! I knew all sorts of secrets about my parents that they never dreamed I knew...and like I said, as a small child I was able to climb ONTO the fridge and sit on it eating the baby aspirin from the back of the cabinet. What if that were where my mother hid the gun knowing I could never find it...she obviously thought it was a safe place to hide medications.

LaCi - posted on 06/24/2010

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I know he won't always be a baby, I never argued this was the permanent solution.

I also never argued that people leaving guns out on a table with a toddler nearby was safe, and I said people need to have the appropriate gun safety training as well as stricter regulation of weapons.

One or both of us being dead is worth it if it means he isn't dead. Fight to the death to defend your kid, that is my rule. Like I said before, all action depends on circumstance. Everything varies with the situation.

As for it not being like target practice, I'm quite amazing under pressure and quite calm in chaos. It's a gift.

[deleted account]

I agree Laura that is what I have been trying to say but pro-gun seem to think this is a none point - I keep being told it is impossible that their children would get hold of their gun...oh but if they did they would not play with it because they know not to. Yeah because that stopped me...oh wait it didn't I still played with things I wasn't supposed to (not guns we have never had guns). :-)

Isobel - posted on 06/24/2010

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and your baby won't always be a baby...rifling through my parents closets (high AND low) was always a favorite past time of mine. There is no safe place for a loaded weapon in the home.

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Laci I sincerly hope you never have to put your emergency plan into force. You seem to be ignoring the fact that shooting/ aiming a gun in times of high anxiety and stress is not the same as target practice and you may well miss!

You have said that you are not worried by a swift response from the police so surely it would be better to lock yourselves in your bedroom or a bathroom and wait for the police than risk getting you or your partner shot - how would your son be protected then? How would he feel seeing one or both of you seriously hurt or worse dead?

I am not disputing that many of the guns used in crime are illegally obtained however as proved in Cumbria a few weeks ago some gun crimes use legal guns that were properly licensed. Removing unecessary guns from homes would reduce crimes like this. It would reduce crimes where children/ teenagers steal their parents legally licensed guns and use them etc.

"How many of the people included in that statistic intentionally killed family members. How many of those people left guns out where children and teenagers could access them. How many of those people have had appropriate gun safety training. So on. There are a lot of factors a single statistic doesn't answer to."

This is why people should not be allowed guns in their homes for protection etc because a lot of the people are not trained in how to handle a gun and are irresponsible with them there are several posts on this thread that state they have a fully loaded weapon in the house some have even stated that they are very accessable so how is this safe?

LaCi - posted on 06/24/2010

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lol @ the tampon box ;x My kids two though, any box.. he'd be in it in a heart beat.

Handgun is high in the bedroom closet, there's no furniture to move, as I said before-I can barely move our furniture. Bedroom door is always locked unless we're in it, kid is not allowed in my bedroom. Forbidden territory. Trigger locked. If he manages to pick a lock, move a bed that weighs a couple hundred pounds, find the gun, and figure out how to unlock it I'll eat my words. Til then, negatory on the danger there.

I don't doubt how irritating I am one bit, and I very well could drive my boyfriend to the point of insanity that he may shoot me one day, I'll take my chances though ;) If he does I don't think that should count against gun owners, since its just as likely and him finally strangling me ;x I can see it now "shut the hell up woman!!!"

Kidding of course. About the killing part.

Krista - posted on 06/24/2010

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Heck, if kids are anything like what I was as a kid, no shelf is too high for them to reach. I was a seriously nosy little shit. That's why our gun cabinet is locked, with the key hidden well. (I hide it in a box of tampons. If you were a small boy, would YOU look in there?)

Isobel - posted on 06/24/2010

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yup...and at least one person on this thread keeps a loaded weapon "up on a shelf" where "it can't be reached" :-/

LaCi - posted on 06/24/2010

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Also has to be taken into consideration: How many of the people included in that statistic intentionally killed family members. How many of those people left guns out where children and teenagers could access them. How many of those people have had appropriate gun safety training. So on. There are a lot of factors a single statistic doesn't answer to.

Isobel - posted on 06/24/2010

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A gun in the home increases the chances that a gun is going to be used against a family member 22 times. It's something that we don't always think about all the implications of a gun in the home. It can be stolen and used against you, it can be grabbed by the bad guy and used against you, it can be found by the child and used accidentally, it can be used by the troubled teenager as part of a suicide, it can be used by a spouse in a domestic dispute. Guns in the home end up causing more violence and not less violence.

Kelly - posted on 06/24/2010

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Sarah, I am glad you have confidence in your Police. I guess it is all about where you live. I have waited hours for a cop to show up when my apartment was broken into. Luckily I wasn't home when it happened. I have also lived in a town where the cops would be there in seconds if you needed them. Mainly because all they ever had to do was catch speeders. Ironically, this area of no crime was in a state where you can still legally walk down the street with a six shooter strapped to you hip, as long as it wasn't concealed you don't need a permit. I personally think that in areas where it is a fact that most people have guns, there are actually LESS break ins. (That has been my personal experience at least living in different parts of the US)

I have no problem with the waiting period to buy firearms, and I think it's a good idea. And you can't just go and buy any gun. I would never say that I need a fully automatic machine gun to protect my home. (At least not yet.... lol) I guess I just don't see a problem with having guns. It's all I have ever known, so it isn't anything special.

Kelly - posted on 06/24/2010

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Just read your reply Laura....... We have a dog that I consider my first line of defense. He knows when a stranger is approaching our house. Not sure how, but he does. My husband could come home at any hour, day or night. Of course he drives a diesel so it is easy to hear him pull up, but when I hear something at the door my first instinct is NOT to grab my gun. Like I said before, my Dad always had a loaded hand gun next to his bed too. (Still does) Not once as a teenager did he meet me at the door pointing a gun at me when I came home in the middle of the night. I am not sure where some get the impression that gun owners are quick draw McGraws...... Have you ever heard something fishy outside your house at night? Have you ever gotten up in the middle of the night and grabbed a knife out of your kitchen, or a baseball bat? I haven't. And I have never grabbed a gun either.

As far as our girls dating and coming home late, my husband has already stated he will be in the front bushes in his Ghillie suit waiting for them. That is, if he isn't on the date with them :)

LaCi - posted on 06/24/2010

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lol. I certainly hope my son, when a teenager, doesn't break windows to get into the house. The least he could do is leave his window unlocked when he sneaks out and come in through the unlocked window, rather than forcing me to buy two new windows :)

Sarah - posted on 06/24/2010

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I don't think I'm lulled into a false sense of security. Perhaps that because of where I live, I don't turn on the news and hear of shootings and stabbings and robberies all of the time (though obviously we DO have crime).
I'm perfectly happy to let the government protect me. I have confidence in the police, and that they would come to my aid if needed.

As I've said before, guns aren't going to go away (more's the pity) but having stricter gun laws is PROVEN to reduce the amount of deaths by guns. It just seems like a no brainer to me.

Isobel - posted on 06/24/2010

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I certainly hope that person trying to break into your home in the middle of the night is never your teen-aged son/daughter.

LaCi - posted on 06/24/2010

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It's not about hearing footsteps, its about hearing obvious signs of intrusion, breaking windows, problems with all the locks, etc. Like I said earlier, the best point for breaking into my house so as to not draw attention from the neighbors requires breaking two windows and dealing with 6 locks- which aren't quietly unlocked.

Kelly - posted on 06/24/2010

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I agree with LaCi a lot on this thread. I have a hard time believing that gangs would line up to turn in their AK's for money. They are more likely making a ton of money dealing drugs and would not be willing to turn in their weapons. Some of you may think I am crazy, and I guess that is fine. I have absolutely no qualms having loaded weapons in my house. My husband and I move quite often with his job, and I like knowing that my family is protected when he is out at work. There is nothing like the sound of a round being chambered in a shotgun. If someone is stupid enough to keep trying to enter my home after hearing that, then that is their problem.

I happen to believe that there are some beautifully crafted guns out there. My husband was given a few by his Grandfather before he passed, and also has his Grandfathers service weapon from when he was a Sheriff.

I don't live every day in fear, and I certainly don't carry weapons around with me daily. I did use to carry a .22 walking when we lived in Wyoming for the coyotes, they were a menace and had no fear. I tend to think that those of you who are so anti-gun are lulled into a false sense of security. You are depending too much on your government to protect you. I was a flight attendant during 9/11 and we were always trained to submit to hijackers. Who would have thought that they would kill and partially decapitate people with box cutters? I bet if there had been guns in the cockpit there would have been a different outcome that day.

Bottom line, there are and will always be weapons out there. If someone wants to kill bad enough, they will find a way gun or no gun. We are responsible gun owners, and I think it is important to teach my children about them. I think someone already stated the fact that if guns are not a mystery, and kids are shown what damage can be caused, they will have respect for the weapon and know that it is not a toy.

Isobel - posted on 06/24/2010

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OK...here's another spin on it... statistically, if you keep a gun in your home you are far more likely to kill or injure a family member than an intruder...in the middle of the night, half asleep, and terrified is probably not the time I want anybody in my family wandering around the house with a loaded weapon. Especially those of us who have older children who get up in the middle of the night to get a snack (or those with teenagers...sneak in or out of the house).

LaCi - posted on 06/24/2010

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In a hallway spanning 3 feet wide I'd imagine with a handgun and a shotgun we're going to hit the target at some point, especially given the fact that both of us have quite good aim and the intruder would be roughly 15 feet from us.

My son's room is behind the estimated location of the shooting and at an angle preventing shots from firing into it. When it comes down to defending a child's life and comforting a child I choose keeping the kid alive. Dialing 911 is hardly an issue, no conversation is necessary as they trace the call and send officers, it takes a few seconds to call 911 and briefly state you're being attacked if you choose to say anything at all. Given the low rate of crime in my area and the proximity to the police station I'm not worried about the time it will take for an officer to arrive. If the intruder has moved he will be in one of two rooms, if he's halfway intelligent he'll simply exit the way he came. if not, officers will arrive shortly, which he will be aware of because I will tell him. If my house were arranged differently I would have different plans in case of emergencies. To me, planning out what to do in case of an intruder is no different than tornado or fire plans. I map out dangerous situations in my head, weigh the potential consequences I decide on the plans for safety in a variety of scenarios. If caught off guard I'm certainly not going to run for a gun and leave my child in a war path, it all depends on the situation, position, and possible strategies to escape, fight, or simply be a good victim.

Could I be shot? Absolutely. That's a risk you take either way. Another case in louisville recently featured nationally to talk about a little girl who survived being shot in the head at the age of 2, 2 men attempting to rob her mother of prescription pills shot and killed her mother, went into the room she was hiding in and shot a two year old in her bed. She never pulled a weapon, they shot her 2 year old regardless. I'll take my chances by doing something to defend my family, anyday. Those two guys? illegal weapons, and if I'm not mistaken, felons who aren't supposed to have any sort of gun in the first place.

As for stricter regulation of weapons, the vast majority of crimes are committed by people in possession of illegal weapons.

I've already stated I'm in favor of somewhat stricter gun laws, I'm absolutely in favor of more effort to eradicate illegal firearms. I am not in favor of people without firearms as a means of protection. I was only disagreeing with your comments regarding guns as ineffective weapons for self defense, as well as dangerous even when hidden, out of reach, and locked up.

[deleted account]

Ok so I pose this question to you Laci if you and your partner are both shooting at this intruder who is looking after your terrified children surely you would want at least one parent with them telling them they are ok and trying soothe them? Just because you are firing more than once does not mean you will hit target and after the first shot the intruder will have tried to move to hide from your bullets and even shoot back towards you potentially hitting both you and your partner leaving your children completely unprotected.

Ok so that is fair to say that moving may not be an option for most people. I agree that poverty and crime goes hand in hand (it is in the poorer parts of my local city that the most gun crime goes on) and do think that reducing poverty is a good start to reducing gun crime - there is a direct correlation between poverty and gang culture (which is where many gun crimes occur) but also can you not agree that gun laws need to be made stricter in order to reduce the number of guns available and reduce the people who can have them so as the people who have them are genuinely in need of them - this would reduce gun theft and thus reduce guns on the street.

LaCi - posted on 06/24/2010

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It's actually not very difficult to aim a gun, especially if you've trained. I also wouldn't want to minimize an intruder's risk of death and I'd be aiming for the head and chest, I wouldn't be firing just once and I wouldn't be the only one shooting, more than likely, we would both be shooting.

Shootings are regular occurrences in the west end of louisville, which is an area of incredible poverty. The people who live there don't have the viable option of moving. My take on the situation has always been if you reduce poverty you reduce gun crime. I'm sure in most areas of the US you can pinpoint the gun crime to neighborhoods in which people are trapped in poverty, which works on a global scale, the more impoverished people in a nation the more gun crime there typically is. Fixing poverty problems is the real issue, in my opinion.

[deleted account]

Yes it may be situational but I never suggested that you had to have a gun pointed at you first I merely pointed out that if a weapon is pulled in any situation you are very likely to get hurt. Have you ever considered that when you are waiting in your darkened hallway for that intruder to break in with your gun aimed where you believe they are going to appear that you may actually miss - shooting a gun in times of high stress (which a break in where you feel you have to use a gun will be) makes it very difficult to hit the target (adrenaline kicks in which may cause you to tremble etc). What happens if you do miss? What if the intruder has a gun themselves and God forbid actually manages to shoot you who will protect your children then? Surely in this situation you would be better to say lock yourself and your family in a room and call the police to say you have an intruder and feel very threatened. Another problem I have with this situation is I personally would not want to have another person's death on my hands (intruder or not)...and I know that you can aim to hit the leg etc so as to minimise the risk of death but again you are in a high stress situation.

I agree if you do not know how to use a gun you should not have one...but many people who do not know how to use a gun have one this is why the laws need to be tightened.

How often do you hear of horrific crimes like that actually happening? They are not regular occurances, if they are where you live I would move rather than have a gun...after all you do have to think of the safety of your family, I would not stay in a place where my children are likely to be subjected to that (I know that nowhere is safe but there are lower risk places).

That's good that you feel like that however, my point is that children will find a way they are clever devious little people who want to explore and I feel that if they want it badly enough they will find a way.

I have never said that I feared guns, I just feel that they are not necessary in some situations, protection in the home being one of them. I can understand what you are saying about people not fearing being shot regardless of the gun crimes (and appreciate that the crackheads are maybe more a direct risk) but would you not like for gun crimes to be reduced? Surely that is worth some people losing their right to own a gun. Surely making the streets safer for your children is worth some people not being able to own a gun for protection.

Have you ever considered that this situation is a continuous cirlce whereby the more law abiding citizens have guns the more criminals have guns, leading to more law abiding citizens having guns leading to more criminals having guns etc. The only way to break this circle is for one side to say OK enough is enough, as this will never be the criminal side the law abiding side has to do it, but by doing it will reduce the number of criminals with guns as well as they will not feel they have to have one just in case.

LaCi - posted on 06/24/2010

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"You are more likely to be killed or seriously injured if you pull out a weapon (any kind be it a gun, knife or baseball bat) when confronted by a criminal, the fact is that most people are just not skilled enough to wield weapons effectively - you may get a lucky hit but then again you may not. "


Thats a very situational statement. I'f you pull a gun when someone already has a gun pointed at your head, yes, you're probably making a terrible mistake. When I hear glass shatter and locks clicking so I wait in the dark hallway for the person who broke the glass to turn the hallway I'm probably going to get the first shot. Theres always a possibility of getting shot in a gunfight, you have to weigh the risks and benefits of your actions. As for not being skilled enough to use a weapon, if you can't effectively use a gun you probably shouldn't have a gun. It's pretty simple. Unless you're planning on waving ti around to intimidate people, which will indeed get you killed.

In my neighboring city about a week ago a house was broken into. The man and woman who lived there were tied up and beaten, I believe the woman was raped, and they were pretty sure they were going to die until something alarmed the criminals. They still haven't been caught, if I'm not mistaken. That's not a situation I'm going to be in if I can help it.

As for the high places not being enough, High place, locked room, and trigger locks. There isn't a single piece of furniture in this house my son can move, except a foam cube which isn't large enough.

While most people don't understand the need for guns I really and honestly don't understand the fear of guns. People get shot here, all the time as everyone has pointed out, and no one I know is every afraid of being shot. It's not even an issue. We're much more cautious of the crackheads in alleys with boxcutters, and much more likely to be cut than shot.

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I really do not feel the need to have a gun for protection (or carry a knife in my handbag)...yes I am a Brit :-) but I live very near to one of our major cities (where apparantly someone is shot or stabbed every single day). I have been around gun crime in the shop I worked in when I was younger (it was held up twice by gunpoint - luckily no-one was hurt just terrified). Yes the UK has gun crime even though it has strict gun laws, many of these crimes are commited by illegally held guns (although the Cumbria one was by a legally held gun).

I do not feel that a complete ban on guns is the answer but the laws need to be tightened (esp. in the US), I feel the only people to have guns should be people who need them professionally (Farmers, army etc). I feel that people who use guns for hobbies such as hunting should have to be part of a club and the guns should be cared for there. I do not understand the desire to have guns in your homes. Yes as Tracey said earlier there are many man things in our homes that are dangerous and could be used as weapons but the crucial point is they are NOT weapons they are not designed to hurt/ maim/ or kill anyone they are designed for specific jobs. I have seen people claim that if guns (for protection) are banned that items such as kitchen knives, bleach and stapplers should be banned but I can think of no other reason for a gun other than shooting animals (it is necesary for some homes to have guns to scare away dangerous animals I realise that) and/ or people.

You are more likely to be killed or seriously injured if you pull out a weapon (any kind be it a gun, knife or baseball bat) when confronted by a criminal, the fact is that most people are just not skilled enough to wield weapons effectively - you may get a lucky hit but then again you may not.

As for those of you who seem to think that because you lock up your guns or place them in a high postion your children will not find them I find that to be (for want of a better word...it's on the tip of my tongue I just can't find it in this mummy brain) very dangerous, I have lost count of the amount of times I have seen my young nieces and nephews pull something over to climb on to get to things very high up. Also children are very curious often when children are told not to do something they do exactly that because they want to know why not...how many of you looked for your xmas pressies because you knew they was in the house somewhere. I don't know how you could take the risk (OK so the ones that are not loaded are less of a risk) it is your childs life your playing with. As for Sara I am flaberghasted that you "do not know where our rifles are. Don't care" you should care where they are even though they are nothing to do with you just for safety reasons.

I understand that guns don't kill people, people do and that if guns were not available they would find something else but guns are so impersonal (for most other things you have to be relatively close to a person to kill them) and so make it easier for the person using it to kill with it.

I guess it really is the difference between US and UK because I do not know anyone that wants to keep guns in their homes.

Hannah - posted on 06/22/2010

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I am rather impartial to guns. My husband owned one before we had kids. it just sat in our closet and we never even bought ammo. It was given to him by a friend When I became pregnant with my first child, he sold the gun. I personally do not feel comfortable having a gun in my home. However, I do not give two shits if someone else does! :)

LaCi - posted on 06/22/2010

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baby aspirin should be outlawed. its way to tasty to be medicine.

I'm the tin foil hat type as well laura, no big deal :)

Isobel - posted on 06/22/2010

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OK, back on topic. I don't know how many of you know this about me, but I actually AM a bit of a tin foil hat wearer. I do believe that an apocalyptic event is imminent, not zombies though ;P...I don't trust the government, I have read WAY too many Orwell type books and see WAY too many of those types of things have come true.

So yes, I want a gun. I want a rifle to keep locked away (preferably buried underground) with my inflatable raft, dried meats and veg, and water cleaning tablets.

I probably just ruined a lot of people's opinions of me...but oh well...at least I would keep my gun locked away and not armed on a high shelf...by the way...when my daughter was a year and a half old, I left her playing with blocks in the living room to go to the bathroom for 90 seconds, when I came back she was sitting on top of my microwave eating candy...my mom has a similar story, except I was 5 and I was on top of the fridge, eating baby aspirin /:I

LaCi - posted on 06/22/2010

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You're actually making me sort of appreciate where I live and that's pretty difficult to do

Isobel - posted on 06/22/2010

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don't listen to her...everything can kill you in Australia...everything!
jellyfish, sharks, rip tides, spiders, snakes...everything! One of their Prime Ministers went for a swim on the beach and just never came back /:I

But I hear it's absolutely beautiful :) haha ;P

[deleted account]

Huge, hand-span sized huntsman spiders where we used to live in Tasmania. They like the bush. Harmless except for the heart attacks and nervous-breakdowns they cause!

LaCi - posted on 06/22/2010

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pffft I'd have to hope I didn't die of a heart attack after just seeing some of those spiders lol screw anti venom. I'd need xanax and nitroglycerin at all times. ;)

Jodi - posted on 06/22/2010

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I was around when it happened too Kathy....I think by the time the movie had come out I was so over hearing about it all. I watched the movie when it came out on Video just out of curiosity, and it didn't do anything for me at all.

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I've never seen the film, mainly because I was around at the time and I knew they'd stuff it up!

What is it with this need to make a film anytime anything happens?

Jodi - posted on 06/22/2010

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No-one is surprised - they should never have used an American actress for the role. I don't know any American who can do an Aussie accent. I remember when they announced the film thinking that it was going to be bullshit if they were putting an American in as the lead Australian role. I can't remember the exact line - I have never watched it again and really have no wish to because it was a pretty ordinary movie IMO.

C. - posted on 06/22/2010

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I'm not really sure why you are all so surprised about Meryl Streep's performance.. She's not that great in general. She's kind of a one-note actress. And in the movie she said "that dingo ate my baby", I do believe.. Or at least that's what Elaine said on Seinfeld when she was saying the line..



Edited:



This clip is SO much clearer.. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ghCTZF61e...

Tanya - posted on 06/22/2010

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Jodi that was just what was in his truck. His son is the same way. I don't know what they are thinking. We do have three rifles as i have said but they were all passed down.



My this same uncle gave my brother a rifle not long ago but it was stolen from his house.



And yes Meryl Streep was awful

Ez - posted on 06/21/2010

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Oh ok... just wasn't sure if it was the same thing, or if 'meth' was just speed.

C. - posted on 06/21/2010

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They call it both 'crystal meth' and 'ice' in the US, too, Erin :)
I'll have to catch up on the rest later..

Ez - posted on 06/21/2010

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Laci, if by 'meth' you mean 'crystal meth' or 'ice' (goes by both terms here) then yes we do have issues with that. In the 90s it was ecstasy and speed, but around 10 years ago 'crystal meth' became more common. It was promoted as the 'super speed'. That stuff is evil... sends people completely loony! My brother worked as a security guard in a club for a few years a while back, and he always said the worst incidents were involving patrons on ice. They could hit them over the head with a chair and they still wouldn't go down!

And yes, this shows I spent far too much time around musicians in my early 20s lol.

[deleted account]

where i live, We actually had a pregnant woman bitten by a Brown Snake, One of the most venomous snakes in Australia.
She survived but i wonder if she had been shot by gun if she would have?
Acctually i bet more people die of gun shot wounds and the like then they do snake and spider bites??

Jodi - posted on 06/21/2010

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9 hand guns??? I think that's what astounds me. I mean, really, who needs 9 hand guns?

Jodi - posted on 06/21/2010

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I also remember what a TERRIBLE Aussie accent Meryl Streep had, LOL.

Tanya - posted on 06/21/2010

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Kathy I remember running around saying " A dingo stole my baby". I think it became a movie of the week here.

Tanya - posted on 06/21/2010

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Oh well in that case may we borrow some?

I really think that most Americans would like to see less guns.
I just know so many people that would never give up their guns. They wouldn't care how much the buy back was.

I have an uncle who found 9 hand guns while cleaning out his truck. I don't think he would give his up without a fight.

[deleted account]

Tanya, that was a LONG time ago! The mother said a dingo took the baby, but the mother was found guilty of the baby's murder and imprisoned. The police later found bits of the baby's clothing in a dingo's lair, and the mother was exonerated and released. Just as well they didn't have the death penalty!

Jodi - posted on 06/21/2010

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It's how we control immigration - we set dingoes in all the airports and tourist areas.

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