Honest opinions

Alahnna - posted on 10/01/2010 ( 110 moms have responded )

129

9

11

There was a letter from the teacher in my daughter's folder yesterday. It stated that we will no longer be able to send birthday invitations to the school due to past issues and of course, the teacher cannot give out phone numbers due to confidentiality. So, I was sitting there scratching my head thinking, how the heck are parents going to be able to invite other children in the class to parties our children may want to, but we don't know the phone numbers/addresses?

My daughter invited a friend over today and I was talking to her mom on the phone. Turns out, she was the reason the note was sent home. Apparently, she said that there were issues with some children being invited to parties and not others, and some of the girls in her younger daughter's class told one girl not to invite her daughter because of the dress she was wearing (grade 1). My daughter and her older daughter are in grade 2, and this mother feels the girls are too young to understand being "excluded" from parties.

Personally, I think this is rediculous. I think age 7 is plenty old to be able to teach your child that they will not always be invited to all the parties and that just like they have special friends they invite to things, other people will too. Plus I think at this age, lots of parents don't want to invite the whole class anymore, so they tell the child they can only invite so many children.

Am I wrong in my thinking? Personally, by the sounds of it, I think the mom got her panties in a wad because her daughter wasn't invited to a party and she invited that child, because as we were talking, I mentioned my daughter was going to a party the next day and the mother was all like "well, my daughter didn't get an invite, but she came my daughter's party, that's strange..." And she repeated it a couple times.

Do you think 6 and 7 year olds are too young to begin to be taught they aren't always going to be invited to parties?

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Jodi - posted on 10/01/2010

3,562

36

3907

"Plus, many are establishing their self esteem at that point, and we want them to be confident and not constantly wondering "what did I do wrong?""



oh yes, much better to shelter them while they are young and then let them deal with it (having had no tools because they haven't been taught) when they are teenagers, because we all know that teens don't need self esteem.



I think it is MUCH better to stop wrapping our children in cotton wool and allow them to experience this and learn how to deal with it from Day 1.



Neither of my kids have any self esteem issues as a result of not being invited to parties or being excluded. But I'm betting if I had sheltered them from the realities and just sprung it on them when they were 12 there'd be plenty of problems.

Maria - posted on 10/02/2010

73

14

5

This is the same kind of attitude that thinks sports teams have to give a trophy to every kid. Do we really need to celebrate the 7th place team? Sorry I know that's a bit off topic but at some point children will be disappointed, will fail, will fall down and not everyone is going to like them. If we as adults don't teach them to accept disappointment, failures and losses then we too are failing as parents.

Amie - posted on 10/01/2010

6,596

20

412

AND everyone entirely skipped over the most important points.



1) The bullying should have been addressed at school and between the parents.



2) Not all parents can afford to plan for and host a party for all the kids. No one should be expected to either. Entitlement much?



Kids this age are not too young to learn these lessons. I learned these lessons at this age, a good deal of people I know did as well. My kids are learning them and they're fine! They're some of the nicer kids in their classes too. Go figure, the ones who are taught it's not all about them, they can't always be invited to every party, that not everyone is going to like them, some parents can only choose really close friends because of costs are some of the kindest kids in class. Maybe because they already know and understand? I'd say so.



I'm constantly astounded though how parents figure they need to 'save' their children and how dumb they think they are. That is the message you are portraying btw. "They're too young to understand." No they are not.



If however, people want to think this way that is entirely your prerogative. I'm sure your children will turn out fine too.

Isobel - posted on 10/01/2010

9,849

0

286

ummmm...in theory I agree with you guys but it's not always that simple. It is one thing to explain to a child that they will not be invited to EVERY party...it's entirely a different matter when ONE BITCH child decides to single your child out and makes sure that no other girls invite her either.

I agree in a sense, that I did tell my daughter to let it go...but it's a HUGE relief that it's over...and I was ready to have her change schools.

[deleted account]

I completely agree with you Alannah.

I do feel badly though if the girls were being mean and telling one and other not to invite so-and-so because they didn't like her dress. THAT needs to be addressed because I feel it's a form of bullying.

This conversation has been closed to further comments

110 Comments

View replies by

Amy - posted on 09/03/2012

64

0

7

Amen, Petra! There was a very recent incident regarding my daughter and her cousin being invited to a friend's birthday party. They were on a softball team together this year and became very good friends. The girl who had the birthday party invited only 3 girls from the team...the same 3 who always helped her during practice and games, who invited her to join them no matter what they were doing. There was another girl on the team who was not invited but heard about the party. Do you know she (the girl) called up the birthday girl and complained about it? The moms and the children ended up getting together to discuss this issue. All parents on the team had the same complaints about the child: she is bossy, a bully, is constantly criticizing other kids, and actually tells the other girls that she is why the team is so good. The birthday girl's mom told that child's mom that the way she treated the girls (her daughter included) and her attitude is why she was not invited to the party. The daughter (uninvited one) acts exactly like her mother so I'm sure the mother contributed. Parties are meant to have fun. If a child does not like someone (for whatever reason) then it is his or her right to not invite that child. This also gives the child the right to decide and choose, which I think is very important.

Petra - posted on 09/03/2012

533

16

22

This is a really silly thing to get bent about. I don't remember any of these kinds of issues from my childhood and I'm assuming it's because no one made a big issue out of it. Parents cause this drama, not kids. Some moms can handle a party of 22, some invite only their child's best friend to celebrate. Get over it. If bullying is occurring, like many others said, that is an issue separate and apart from birthday party invites. Who cares how and when they're distributed? Those who weren't invited are still going to know they weren't invited. Childhood & adolescence have far worse surprises in store for your kid than not receiving a freakin' birthday invite in class or on the playground or in their backpack.



I can't believe there are moms who have nothing better to do than raise hell over invite etiquette among 6 year olds. Thanks for creating Big Brothers out of our school system and making every single little thing unnecessarily difficult. Those who live vicariously through their kids and take offence to not being invited have really got to find better things to do with their time.

Amy - posted on 09/02/2012

64

0

7

Children do need to be taught that they won't always be invited to parties, that they won't always win, etc. This is a major problem in society period. Basically the way school systems (most, not sure if all) are set up is to teach children everything is fair and even when in reality it isn't. What they do in the elementary schools in my district is the teacher sends a form home to the parents to add whatever personal information they want to include in what is called "a friend list". This is so when a child has a party and doesn't want to invite everyone, they can mail an invitation or parents can call. To me, that is absolutely ridiculous.



If it is your child's birthday party, it should be up to the child who he or she wants to invite from school. A lot of parents need to grow up and be adults.

Sara - posted on 09/02/2012

7

1

0

This is a matter that has more to do with the view of an adult than the view of a child. This is how we instill children bad habits and bad feelings. A child is a child and we don't know what is happening in their families or how hard their lives are. When we start separating kids because of the way they look or dress or what they own is when we as adults are falling in denigration. I am the mother of a child who was not invited to parties just because the teacher told the students she was retarded, stupid and dirty. Nothing further from the truth but a religious adult put thoughts and beliefs in children and marked my daughter for the time she spent in that school. If I don't want to invite a child to my daughter's party (which will never happen, I learned my lesson) I will personally go to the school and wait outside to give invitations only to the people who are welcome. That way the kids would not find out and would not be hurt. I am a teacher and a mother and I deeply believe children need and deserve respect and good example. One day our child can be the set aside and next can be the center of attention. Our economy changes everyday and none of us are free from being without a job and wearing the same clothes year after year. What would you do if God forbids next year you are not invited because your husband is no longer the CEO or you are not driving the 2013 Mercedez car and had to change it for a beat up 2000 VW that backfires? It is miserable in my eyes to make and emphasize economical differences. We just went through a very difficult time recently, don't forget that, and also don't forget what are you seeding your kids with? Good feelings?I sure hope so.

[deleted account]

My sons' school have this policy. We use the parent directory to get information for invitations because there is no way we can host 20 screaming classmates plus family. 6 and 7 years old is a perfect time to teach that you will not always be invited to parties, but sometimes with the lack of invitation comes mean-spiritedness from classmates who are invited or even the birthday child. Teachers/ Schools prefer not to have to referee situations that arise from a child being excluded from a party especially a child who has a hard time making friends or who is not popular. There are many times that one of my boys gets invited to a party but the other doesn't and we just explain that not everyone can get invited and that parties are expensive. In short, I agree with the school, invitation distribution should not take place at school unless everyone is invited because I doubt you would want the taking time to do this and attend to children with hurt feelings over not being invited. The parents in this room should nominate a room parent and start a phone, email and address list for distribution within the classroom community.

Jillian - posted on 08/29/2012

9

0

0

What does a teacher have to do with a child's birthday party? Nothing! You'd think it was impossible to figure out how to pass out those invites myself. I think it's rude to inflict that drama on the teacher (they get enough already). Why does the teacher have to parent the parents and demand everyone get invited??



No, your kid won't be invited to every party, and when that happens, there is a time for a life lesson. However, kids are rude because their parents are rude. Kids are exclusionary because their parents are, and allow them to be so. Why not invite a whole class if it is possible for you to do so? If it is not possible, then don't worry about it.



Our kids need to know how to be kind, how to be compassionate, and how to be friends with a large group of people. There is no need to "limit" real friendships. Our job, as the parents, is to model these behaviors. It might be hard, but we can be decent, compassionate, kind, generous, strong, helpful people if we decide to try. Our kids can be these things if we teach them how.

Candas - posted on 08/26/2012

6

3

0

Last year my son’s first grade teacher sent home a note asking for parents names, phone numbers, and emails (if they so desired) to have them added to a master “class list” to be sent home for all the parents!!! I thought this idea was frickin’ awesome!!! After we sent invites to school, I knew most kids would forget to give them to their parents, and many parents might forget to reply, I was able to use that list email all of the parents to inform them of the party and things of that nature. Due to that list, my son had a highly successful party at Gatti Town, and our hard earned money did not go to waste on an empty party room!!!

User - posted on 08/26/2012

26

0

1

I think the saddest thing about this is the little girl who isn't being invited to parties. My daughter went through a similar thing in primary school where she was often the one being left out (ie unpopular). It really did hurt her when invites were handed out in school (and used as a weapon "you're NOT invited to my party but you ARE"). So, I can see where the school is coming from.



If this is an issue in your child's class then not only do the children need to learn that not everyone gets invited but actually to constantly exclude the same child is a form of bullying which parents may be inadvertently supporting.



Sounds like your friend and her daughter need some support here...

Diana - posted on 08/24/2012

109

0

0

In my kids' elementary school the rule was that unless you are inviting the entire class, invitations are not to be sent in to be passed out at school.



As far as not always being invited to parties, I don't think that 6 & 7 are too old to learn that lesson. As a matter of fact I would venture to say that most of them could care less. If my kids found out that a few other kids were attending a birthday party that mine weren't invited to, I always followed my kids lead. If they weren't bothered (usually the case), I didn't worry about it. If they were bothered, I would just say that parties are expensive and maybe their mom only let the child invite a certain number of friends or maybe the child's mom only invited people that she could find phone numbers for.



I certainly can understand why schools wouldn't let invitations come to school (even if it does make it mighty inconvenient when you are trying to plan a party). Especially, if one child was be specifically excluded and bullying was an issue.



Our school came up with a great solution by using a voluntary class directory. At the beginning of each school year the children were each sent home with a paper so that the parent could fill out their name & their child's name, address, phone numbers & e-mail addresses to be included in the class directory. If they wanted their information included it was if not, they could opt out. This way parents could mail/e-mail invitations straight to the children's houses or call parents to arrange playdates. It worked out wonderfully...as long as I don't misplace it.

Miss - posted on 08/24/2012

8

84

0

I would be pretty damn pissed if a school gave my info to another parent. That is confidential information. And while yes the kids should understand not being invited to the party they are still children. Who wants to deal with their child feeling left out because their so called friend didn't invite them to their party! And if these children are "friends" with your child, wouldn't u want to know the parent personally. I am not sending my kid to anyone's house without knowing their parent anyway.

Louveda - posted on 08/22/2012

31

52

1

It's not that I think it's too young to begin learning that life lesson.... it's that I think it's too young to be having that kind of social drama surrounding school time. The teachers need to be able to keep the children focused on learning & not worrying about who in the classroom is going to whoms party the next weekend. By enforcing a no party invitations at school rule they have eliminated potential classroom disturbances.

That said...it does sound like this other Mom is too concerned about her kids feelings getting hurt about not being included. Kind of a "How dare you be mean to my kid" mentality. She needs to grow up.

When my kids were in Elem. school the rule was that if invitations were given in class then EVERYONE must be invited. I don't agree with that either but did comply with that when it was affordable to do so. Otherwise, I made a point of friending my kids friends parents so that any invitations could be delivered directly to the family & off of school grounds.

[deleted account]

"I also thing it's common curtacy to invite someone to yours who invited you to theirs."

It's that mentality that perpetuates these types of silly situations. Someone should NOT have to invite someone to their party just because they were invited. How are kids going to understand this if parents don't?!

Micha - posted on 10/07/2010

54

18

7

I'm really on the fence about this... I understand where you're coming from as far as learning that they wont be invited to every little thing early on. But at the same time, I also thing it's common curtacy to invite someone to yours who invited you to theirs.

I think that along with teaching our children that they can't always go, we should also be teaching them to return the favor, so to speak.

Bonnie - posted on 10/07/2010

4,813

22

262

I think that 6 and 7 year olds should be taught right from wrong. They should be taught respect. They don't have to like everybody, but I feel they need to be taught to be nice to everybody. This is why there is waaaaayyyy too much bullying going on nowadays and children are dying or taking their own life because of it. Not every child in a class is going to be invited to the same party. It is not possible. Not only based on the fact that most parents can not afford to have 20-30 kids at a party, but also the fact that not every child communicates with each and every child outside of the classroom, so why would they even want to invite everyone. The best time/place for invitations to be handed out is either before school or after school. This way no one is offended or feels left out. Okay this might happen if the univited kids find out about the party/invitations, but there would be a lot less of a problem.

Heather - posted on 10/07/2010

62

37

4

i think that mom is just jelous because her daughter didnt get invited thats soo stupid!!!

[deleted account]

Well that policy is news to me, but I think that you are right. I mean you can't be best buddies with everyone. I remember when I used to have a limit on how many people I could invite to my parties because well honestly we couldn't afford 500 kids over lol. I reckon that the sooner they learn, the better they will handle it. I mean I never got snotty over not being invited to someones party. Parties do not determine who your friends are. ^-^

Christa - posted on 10/06/2010

583

80

45

No they are not too young to be taught that sometimes you will be disappointed in life and not every party will you be invited too....yet at the same time they may be too young to understand that by not inviting someone you can hurt their feelings. And lets be honest. When kids are at school passing out invites to a birthday party and all but a few girls get an invite....those few are going to be hurt. And at that age, one day they are your best friend and the next day a different one is your best friend and the next day you are the one that is no one's friend. Our school has that policy and I totally agree with it.

Desiree - posted on 10/06/2010

910

17

13

Has anyone thought for a second that a child could be excluded because another mom doesn't like one mom or other. sometimes the mom's in question are so pushy that they get the other moms upset and then the child takes the brunt of the problem. sometimes its the mom at home who causes a thing and then the child goes to school and cause even more problems because he or she is unable to explain to her mom why they didn't get invited. Not getting invite to another persons house is not always a bad thing children need to learn from very early in life that being popular is not going to make you the best in everything and that popularity has a very definate downside. And in many cases moms need to learn this lesson just as badly. the only time a mom should get involved is when it becomes out of control and the child is being bullied. Not being invited to a party is not the end of the world.

Isobel - posted on 10/05/2010

9,849

0

286

The actual situation took place outside...I was just explaining how it would've been worse had her school not held their policy and it been in the classroom...like all of you would have (I'm sure) I explained to her that the girl is just mean, indeed, she just went to play with other girls...I'm not raising a child to grow up to be a whiny complainer...nor would I have been the one to insist that the policy be instituted...I just see why they do it, that's all.

Charlene - posted on 10/05/2010

631

29

25

Of course. ;)

And I really do hope that all that crap with Eve's bully is sorted out. It sucks being bullied. ♥

Charlene - posted on 10/05/2010

631

29

25

I already said myself that here, it's done before class, during recess/break/lunch or after class unless the whole class is invited..... But I don't think it's rude for a kid to go to their friend's desk before class starts to give them an invite. :/

Isobel - posted on 10/05/2010

9,849

0

286

WHY is it SO important to do it INSIDE the classroom? it's rude, it's stupid...the hallway is 5 feet away...and nobody HAS to stay there.

Stifler's - posted on 10/05/2010

15,141

154

604

The same thing could have happened in the playground, she may have been within earshot and her feelings would still be hurt and Lucy would have still given her an evil smile. And why would I call a child who is a victim of bullying an asshole? Give me some credit here. I agree also that banning passing out invites in the classroom won't stop the bullying regarding "if you don't give me this I won't invite you to my party" and 'don't invite that person to your birthday.. she smells". They are separate issues.

Charlene - posted on 10/05/2010

631

29

25

Laura, that situation, like you already pointed out, might have happened anyway, whether it was outside the classroom or not. It doesn't matter if your little girl was able to walk away or not, the hurt would still be there. I know the feeling.. it is TERRIBLE.
The bullying should be addressed separately.. it doesn't mean that no one should be allowed to bring invites at all.
Why should one bad apple spoil the bunch?

Heather - posted on 10/05/2010

389

17

18

So instead of addressing the bullying going on in class with the parents of *Lucy* or the teacher, the answer is to make it against the rules to pass out invitations in the classroom?? I guess we'll just have to dissagree about this one then. I think it can be done appropriately in the classroom. I don't think it's rude unless there's a malicious intent behind it.

Isobel - posted on 10/05/2010

9,849

0

286

Let's see if I can make this clearer.

My daughter Eve, has a "best" friend (who I'm not sure is a really good friend...but whatever) named Jennifer. The coolest girl in school has decided to hate my daughter (for whatever reason...I don't know)...her name is Lucy.

Lucy let's it be known to Jennifer that IF she invites Eve to her party...she will make sure that NOBODY else goes. Of course, then Jennifer does not invite Eve. She arrives in class with invitations in hand and hands them out to the other 5 girls that are in their group of friends...and all of them look over at Eve...then back at their invitations...open them and start getting all excited.

note...none of them have done anything wrong.

Lucy turns to Eve and smiles her evil little smile...and laughs at her.

Had this exchange happened in the hallway, or in the school yard, Eve could have left. She could have gone to play with other friends...but no...this display was intentionally played out while she was held captive in class.

Take it outside...is it REALLY that big of a deal???

Charlene - posted on 10/05/2010

631

29

25

I'm reading it the same way as Heather.....

Anyway.. I think this is ridiculous.. and before you ask Laura, I HAVE been on the victim of bullying when it came to party invites. Actually, I was bullied all throughout my school years.
That's not the issue that the OP is talking about. It's a separate matter altogether.

IMO, it's silly to not allow invitations to be handed out at school because some kids might get their feelings hurt about not being invited. USE IT AS A TEACHING TOOL. If your kid isn't invited, yes console them, but also use this event as a valuable life lesson for your child. You don't always get invited to every party/win every game/get everything you want.
I feel sorry for the kids that NEVER have to learn this lesson and find out the hard way when they get a bit older.

And generally, our invites were handed out before class, during break/recess/lunch or after school while waiting for buses/walker's dismissal. Never during class and never by the Teacher unless EVERYONE was invited.

Isobel - posted on 10/05/2010

9,849

0

286

see, the way I read it...the asshole is the kid who was upset about it...not the bully

Heather - posted on 10/05/2010

389

17

18

NO ONE CALLED A HURT CHILD AN ASSHOLE! Please go back and read Emma's post again. She said the rules shouldn't be changed because one child was a bully(asshole) about it. She wasn't saying the hurt child was the asshole, she was saying the girl being mean was in the wrong.

Isobel - posted on 10/05/2010

9,849

0

286

I said they were encouraging their child to be rude...and that I was glad the teacher was teaching them manners...there's a difference between that and calling a hurt child an ASSHOLE

Heather - posted on 10/05/2010

389

17

18

I always find it interesting what people find to be rude. It would be nice if people would take their own advice and not be rude. No matter what your opinion is, it doesn't excuse you condemning someone else's child as rude.

Isobel - posted on 10/05/2010

9,849

0

286

oh, and by the way...calling a CHILD an asshole for being hurt? that's also rude

Heather - posted on 10/05/2010

389

17

18

I don't know of any classroom anywhere where a child stands up during class and passes out invitations to a few people. They might do it before class starts or during a break or even right before everybody leaves, but I've never heard of a teacher allowing a student to give out invitations DURING class.

To answer the question you keep asking @Laura ?: If I walked into a party of mixed company, I wouldn't find it rude to give out invitations to a select few. I would certainly be discreet about it, I wouldn't stand up and ask for "so-n-so" to come up and get their invitation, but I'd still pass them out. It's not rude, it's efficient. If everyone at the party was my friend, I'd probably invite them if I could.

Isobel - posted on 10/05/2010

9,849

0

286

I agree with you entirely...what does that have to do with being rude to your friends INSIDE a classROOM?

JuLeah - posted on 10/05/2010

3,133

38

694

I don't think who was invited is the issue here. I think it is more of 'one kid fell off the swing and broke an arm, so we take out the swings"

In the history of the school (50 years) two kids have fallen off. When it happened years back the reaction was "yah, that happens"

The reaction this time was "AGHAGAH Take out ALL swings. The kids could DIE!! What if he had cracked his head open? What if the shock had caused another to faint? What about the long lasting trauma for the child and the ones who watched it happen??? We will have to bring in a professional to talk with the children who now have PTSD. We will have to change what the teachers teach in the classroom to include swing safety. We will have to now get permission from all parents before we allow any other child to walk out on the playground ...."



This is one of my pet peeves BTW

Isobel - posted on 10/05/2010

9,849

0

286

ahhhhh see...that I have no problem with. The custom over here has always been for the child to hand them out IN class. That's all I was saying :)

Ez - posted on 10/05/2010

6,569

25

237

No of course I wouldn't.



Is it normal to for kids to socialise inside classrooms over there? Because as far as I'm aware, invitations are only ever dealt with in the playground at breaks here. I can agree it shouldn't be done in the classroom.. it's not the time or the place.

Isobel - posted on 10/05/2010

9,849

0

286

and perhaps you have to witness this type of bullying first hand to understand it...it's not always visible to outsiders or teachers...it's a little smirk, a group of girls giggling because they know the other child is hurt, if you haven't been a victim of it, you really can't understand it.

Isobel - posted on 10/05/2010

9,849

0

286

I just don't think that *inside the classroom* note I didn't say anything about the hallways or the schoolyard is the place for it...I think it's rude and hurtful and that teachers shouldn't have to deal with it.

Erin, would you walk into a group of 20 of your friends and hand out 3 or 4 invitations? Maybe it's just my set of manners, I don't know.

Stifler's - posted on 10/05/2010

15,141

154

604

Peanut bans are a matter of life and death for some people, this is not. It's party invitations. If the teacher told me my kid was bullying others I'd cancel their party but I don't see why they shouldn't be allowed to hand out invites just because one kid was an asshole about it, making more work and handing frivolous responsibilities to teachers.

Ez - posted on 10/05/2010

6,569

25

237

Emma makes a valid point though. What has changed so much in the last 20 years that what was once just a normal part of school life (ie, handing out invitations to friends) is now this huge dilemma?



And for the record, I fully support peanut bans because it is a matter of life and death for some children. Banning the distribution of invitations is hardly the same thing. Would it be nice if all children could be included all the time? Of course. But that's not realistic.



The bullying that is mentioned in this thread is a separate issue to the party issue IMO. Teasing and targeting a child for any reason is unacceptable, and needs to be dealt with by schools and parents. If there is taunting associated with handing out the invites, then obviously the teachers need to step in. I wouldn't lose sleep over my child not being allowed to hand out invitations, I just don't understand why it is now such a huge issue? I've never heard of there being policies on this here in Aus.

Isobel - posted on 10/05/2010

9,849

0

286

you obviously don't understand what I'm trying to say. I know that children NEED to learn to get over the fact that they are not invited to everything...I have explained to my children SEVERAL times that not everybody can invite everybody...and they don't even complain about it anymore.

The fact is that a lot of children use Birthday parties to alienate and torture other children...talk to me about that one AFTER you've watched you child go through it...cause it's heartbreaking.

Why is it SUCH a big deal that YOUR child MUST be allowed to rudely (and yes, it is RUDE to hand out selective invites in front of other friends who are not invited) invite kids INSIDE the classroom in order to stop those other kids from bullying?

are you one of those parents who bitches about not being allowed to send peanuts either? I just don't get it.

Stifler's - posted on 10/05/2010

15,141

154

604

I was in grade 1 once if I recall correctly. I didn't get invited to everyone's birthday, and I only invited friends to mine and the teacher or my mum didn't hand out invites... I did.

Isobel - posted on 10/05/2010

9,849

0

286

your child isn't in school yet, I assume?...either that or you can afford to invite as many kids as your child wants. Many times my daughter has come home with a list of 15 friends that she wants to invite to her party when we are throwing a party for 5 or 6.



And you're right, it's not the job of the teacher to be involved in making sure the child is discreet...it's yours. therefore...keep them out of the classroom, so that the children aren't rude or bullies. simple.

Stifler's - posted on 10/05/2010

15,141

154

604

I don't think it's the teachers responsibility to police invitations and discreetly slip them in children's bags. Your kid would be inviting friends, why would kids that aren't even friends with your kid want to come to their party?

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms