Induction/C-section before 40 weeks

Ez - posted on 11/19/2010 ( 49 moms have responded )

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Alarmed by an increase in the number of women choosing to give birth early, health officials are urging expectant mothers and their doctors to observe the virtue of patience.



Perhaps as many as one in every five babies are born early through elective delivery in California – through inducement or Caesarean section, which are done without a medical

reason, according to researchers.



As a result, more children are being born before they can fully develop in the womb, at the risk of stunting their brain and lung development – and possibly subjecting them to confinement in neonatal intensive care units (NICU).



The March of Dimes, physician groups and the California Department of Public Health have launched a statewide campaign to educate women and empower physicians to reduce the number of elective early births, some occurring nearly a month before due dates.



"We think it's a real issue, and one of the drivers for NICU admissions," said Dr. Elliott Main, a Bay Area obstetrician and director of the California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative.



No one knows how many women opt for early delivery simply to alleviate the routine pains and stresses of pregnancy: fatigue, back pain, swollen ankles and the other travails of having a baby.



"Women come in under the assumption that there are no risks. It's not clear to me why they think that," Main said.



Why would a woman want to deliver a child before its due date?



"You ask any woman and she'll tell you that those last few weeks are rough … (and) are really uncomfortable," said Dr. Connie Mitchell, of the California Department of Public Health's Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Division.



"If we can wait, the mother and child will do better."



Blame early elective deliveries partly on convenience – scheduling a child's birth because family is in town, husbands are about to be deployed overseas or a specific date would seemingly provide good fortune.



But for some women, they're just "tired of being pregnant," said Jeanne Conry, chief of obstetrics at Kaiser's Roseville Medical Center and the California chair of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.



Conry helped develop a tool kit that hospitals and doctors can use to dissuade women from seeking early births and to help doctors educate them about the potential harm in delivering babies before their time. The program could also help hospitals keep better tabs on how often women request elective deliveries.



Pregnancy has typically been thought of as a nine-month process. But advances in science now measure fetal development in weeks – with 40 weeks as the accepted benchmark for a full-term pregnancy.



Problem is, some women do their own math and multiply nine months by four weeks – the length of time many consider a full month. But the computation is ill-advised when it comes to figuring out a child's development.



"In the last six weeks of pregnancy, the baby's brain connections for balance and coordination and learning (are) still developing. The size of the brain nearly doubles," said Leslie Kowalewski, the associate state director for the March of Dimes in California.



Obstetricians have a role, too.



"I can't tell you the number of times I have a patient who is so miserable tell me that she just wants to deliver," said Dr. William Gilbert, an obstetrician and regional medical director for women's services for Sutter Health. "I won't do it. Unless they hold a gun to me."



Read more: http://www.sacbee.com/2010/11/17/3190993...



My personal experience with the issue of induction has actually been good (surprising considering how I feel about hospital birth). I didn't end up needing the induction, because I was lucky enough to have a doctor who was honest about the risks of an induction failing on an unfavourable cervix. He was supportive of my wish to birth naturally (too bad he wasn't there when I delivered, but I digress) and waited until I was 4cm dilated (at 41+1) before scheduling the induction (on 41+4). I went into labour myself the day before, so avoided it completely.



Now in my case there was no concern that my daughter may have been early, as I was well past my due date. But I have a friend who's OB scheduled an induction for 39+6, for no reason other than it suited them both (she actually had the baby 3 days before the induction date - yay!). I know of another girl who went for a consult with her OB on her due date, had not started dilating yet, so was offered a c-section for that afternoon (she took it). And there was a woman in hospital with me after Milla was born, who had been induced at 37+wks for suspected macrosomia. Her baby was only 8lbs, and had to spend time in NICU due to respiratory problems. I heard her crying on the phone, beating herself up over the induction. It was awful.



Also, all of these cases were in our private system, which is much the same as the American for-profit health system. I haven't personally heard of such cases happening in our public system, though that's not to say it doesn't. But I wonder if the health care system plays a role in letting patients dictate the treatment and management option. Like, I'm paying you so do as I say? IDK..



So firstly, do you think being 'over it' is enough of a reason to induce?

And do you think the process of informed consent is followed rigorously in cases of early induction or c-section? If a pregnant mumma was told of the increased risk of NICU admission and c-section (and other complications), do you think she would still agree to induce early with no medical indication?

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Jodi - posted on 11/19/2010

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For military Moms, well, that baby didn't choose to be born to a military family, why should that child have to suffer so many health risks and complications just so that dad can be there? Not fair to the kid at all, and that's the only person I care about! (Sounds harsh, but hey, adults can take care of themselves, poor little baby might have to be hooked up to feeding tubes, breathing tubes, IV's and Lord knows what else.)
BUT, I do not think the responsibility for bad outcomes should lie solely on the OB's shoulders. There is a wealth of information right at our very fingertips, there is absolutely NO excuse for not knowing the very basic (and still very scary) complications and risks associated wth early birth. As parents, it's our JOB to do our best to make educated decisions that will greatly affect the health and well-being of our children. Blaming it ALL on the doctor is a cop out.

Mary - posted on 11/19/2010

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Not enough time for me to elaborate all my thoughts on this, but just wanted to throw this out about the 36 weeker and the amnio...

Grandma is probably missing part of the story. It is not atypical to do an amnio for lung maturity on insulin-dependent diabetics (life-long), or on poorly controlled gestational diabetics whose sugars are all over the place (or are just flat-out non-compliant). Suspected macrosomia at 36 weeks is not an indication for an amnio nor induction. There is something else going on with her.

Charlie - posted on 11/19/2010

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No baby should be forced out of the womb before end of gestation for no medical that is selfish .

Sarah - posted on 11/19/2010

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That's exactly the type of thing I mean Jenn when I say sometimes C-section are necessary.
I think people are sometimes really quick to judge about women that have C-sections........

Ez - posted on 11/19/2010

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I disagree with early induction for military mummas too. Yes, it sucks, but not as much as having a baby in NICU with problems caused by forcing them to come too soon.

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[deleted account]

Here in the UK VBAC is strongly encouraged, obviously depending on why you had the first c-section. My mother in law had a c-section with my husband because he was breech and went on to have 3 vaginal births =]

Eliz - posted on 11/20/2010

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I think it's important to let babies fully develope unless there is a medical reason they need to come early. I had to have a c-section with my second because my town doesnt do V-backs and my doctor wanted to schedule my c-section 2 weeks before my due date and I said no. I finally allowed him to schedule it when I was a couple days past my due date. My first child was a c-section due to being the wrong way and would not deliver safely vaginally.

Charlie - posted on 11/20/2010

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Sorry Erin thats what i meant Arg , still no coffee !
I've loved my public hospital experiances Canberra hospital was amazing they encourage a natural birth and were so supportive .

[deleted account]

Our public system doesn't like to do anything to make birthing our children a nicer experience ( My local maternity ward is the BEST it's a pity i couldn't give birth there) or what we want. Where as in the private you can even try for a VBAC. You have buckly's and none if you public.

Ez - posted on 11/20/2010

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That's in the public system Loureen. My local public hospital typically won't schedule an induction until at least 41+3. It's very different in the private hospitals though... much more of a consumer-driven policy. That's where those examples I used in the OP occurred.

Jenn - posted on 11/20/2010

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Yeah, I have twins too. Trust me, by the time you get to 38 weeks you'll be ready. Ready to burst! LOL!! If you check out the pics section there's a pic of me just hours before giving birth to my girls at 38 weeks. It was the same here - induce by 38 weeks if nothing has happened. I was lucky enough to have them vaginally, and it was actually quite an easy birth - especially compared with my son who was born at 42 weeks. With him they used pitocin and it was HELL (I had to push for 3 hours)! With the girls they just broke my water and I got up and walked and walked and walked and 3 hours later they were born! Best of luck to you! :)

Jodi - posted on 11/20/2010

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Jen, I am not being forced into a c-section unless the babies are in the wrong positions or there are medical complications. BUT, if I have not gone into labor naturally by 38 weeks I have to be induced. It's the policy of the hospital due to possible problems with the placentas after that point. I don't like it, I see no reason why I should "have" to be induced because something "might" go wrong, but, like I said, I'll fight that battle when I get to it! I just don't get it, by that time I'll be having weekly if not twice weekly ultrasounds to make sure everything is fine...ultimately, it comes down to what's best for MY babies, but they do try to treat a twin pregnancy like a textbook case where everyone is treated the same! :(

Jess - posted on 11/20/2010

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I found it really hard to get diagnosed with what was wrong, I have Pre E that wasn't treated because the hospital didn't do enough regular check ups, and when I called them for advise they really didn't care. Unless you were actually delivering they didn't have time for questions.

I worked full time until a week before Ava was born and even then people told me I should have stayed on longer. I found the general communities attitude to pregnancy quite poor. I don't know that the hospital necessarily needs to generate the help, but there should be services made available to help out women with the day to day chores like shopping, washing, cleaning during those last few tough weeks. I found it so hard to spend all night spewing up only to have to get up the next morning and run a household. Women who already have kids would have it even worse !

I just think if there was help out there for pregnant women to make their day's easier fewer women would push for early delivery. * no pun intended*

Mary - posted on 11/20/2010

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Jess, what kind of support do you think the hospital should have given you, but didn't? Believe me, I understand how miserable you were, since I too hurled from 11 weeks until her head came out - and those last few seeks were by far the worst. However, the only "cure" for that particular problem is delivery. So other than delivering you early, I'm not sure what you thought they should do.

[deleted account]

Jess every pregnant woman feels over it, 40 weeks is a long time and in my experience as the end gets closer you get more impatient for it, which is probably why that last month is such a drag (says she who never got past 37 weeks lol).



I felt incredibly supported from before I was admitted to hospital, as well as when I was in the hospital, so I don't think you can generalise that woman don't have enough support, some do, some don't it is all subjective to individual opinions.



Oh and Dana there is a huge difference between nature stepping in and you naturally having a child early/ needing to have a c-section early for health reasons to choosing for your convience to have a baby early - if nature means you have to have babies early that is not something to feel guilty about.

Jess - posted on 11/20/2010

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I don't think there is enough support for pregnant women, and this causes that "I'm over it" feeling. I know when I was pregnant I was sick from before the positive pee test until after my daughter was born *induced 5 weeks early*, I was VERY over it.

My induction was for medical reason's, not as a personal choice. But I know that if there was more support and help from the hospital, I wouldn't have felt the way I did. I spent almost every night of the last few weeks of my pregnancy vomiting non stop, the hospital couldn't have cared less ! When you feel like your going to die, you just want an easy way out. While I was worried about my daughters health, I was just so happy to know I would be feeling better sooner rather than later.

Its easy to blame pregnant women, but lets focus on what can be done to support them through the rough last few weeks so they get to feeling "over it"

[deleted account]

I completely disagree with scheduling births for military families, yes it is nice if dad can attend the birth but nothing is worth the health of your baby, early induction/ c-section doesn't just give short term problems some babies have issues that last a lifetime from it. Why would anyone want to choose that for their baby just so dad can be at the birth?

[deleted account]

I don't agree with an early induction even for military families. It may sound harsh but at the end of the day they chose to join the army. Why should the health of the baby be risked just so they will be able to attend the birth. To me it's not a risk I would be able to take, to people who could each to their own.

Kim - posted on 11/19/2010

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My last child was by c-sec because my 2nd was a c-sec due to a previa. My OB scheduled it at 39 wks. Now it really wasn't convienent for me since 2 days later my son was in a play at Church and I'd have to miss it but my OB only had regular c-sec times on Mon and Fri and I didn't want to risk my daughter having her too early just for a play. I did have some problems so he didn't want to chance me going too long so the following Monday wasn't an option either. Your baby should come first.
A friend was telling me that her friend wanted the baby to come and even though u/s showed the baby wasn't as far along as they were saying. The OB induced anyway. The baby had a collapsed lung and may have brain damage. The parents feel horrible but they didn't know the risks while the OB did! He is the one that should be responsible!!

Dana - posted on 11/19/2010

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That's California for you, I swear it's like it's a whole different country compared to the rest of the US...well maybe California and Texas. ;)

I can't imagine choosing to have a C-section that early. With my condition they would want to schedule a C-section at 34 wks because that's when my son decided to come. If I happen to get pregnant again, I'm going to fight tooth and nail to go longer. Part of me almost feels guilty having another child because I know it would be born early, I can't imagine being so lackadaisical about it.

Hannah - posted on 11/19/2010

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Well, what about a military family? Should inductions/csections be allowed to families who are going to be seperated for long periods of time due to deployments? If my hubby were being sent away for deployment I would want and early induction. Seeing the birth of your child is something no one should miss out on, I mean God forbid something happened to him, he would have never met his child if it werent for early inductions...

[deleted account]

I had an amnio at 21 weeks. The consultant who performed it had been working at the hospital for 25 years and in that time she had never had a woman lose her baby as a result.



I had mine because they found echogenic bowel at my 20 week scan. This is a big marker for genetic diseases. It is very rarely found on scans on only 1% of scans and of those about 1% will be born with a genetic disease such as down's syndrome, patua's syndrome, edward's disease, and cystic fybrosis. Or it can be caused by infection, early pregnancy bleeding or in some cases they never find a cause.



We knew the risks involved and even though we knew we would not consider terminating the pregnancy if our child did have one of those conditions we wanted to go ahead with it so that if he did, we would be well prepared for the birth.



Fortunately, all the tests came back negative and he was born perfectly healthy. Apart from being a small baby as echogenic bowel usually causes growth restrictions. They think it happened because I had a small amount of bleeding at around 10 weeks. I think it totally depends on the reason you're recommended to have one and obviously the person's own choice.

Jodi - posted on 11/19/2010

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I am 25 weeks pregnant with twins...and I am SO over this pregnancy already! Should I induce? Hell NO! Being "over it" is such a cop out excuse for getting a c-section before being full term. Unfotunately, my doctor is giving me little choice in this pregnancy, with twins, it's 38 weeks at this hospital and I have thus far refused to schedule anything until I hit that 38 week mark and they MAKE me! lol
I think women should be given the worse case scenerios about early induction/c-sections, I'm terrified to deliver these babies 2 weeks early, and I can't imagine CHOOSING to do so because I'm tired of being pregnant! (Medical reasons are a whole different ball of wax.)

Lacye - posted on 11/19/2010

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I think it is awful to induce before the baby is ready if there is not a medical reason. My cousin had to have a c-section this past week because they were worried about her and the baby, she's 42 and she was on high risk pregnancy. If there is not a medical reason, I think it should be illegal to induce or have a c-section. I had my daughter 2 weeks early but that was her decision, not mine. I wanted to carry her to her full date but that wasn't possible. It's insane. If you have carried a child for 36 weeks, just wait the last 4 weeks! The child needs those 4 weeks to develop. That is precious time that these people are taking away from them just because they are tired of being pregnant. That's just laziness to me.

Rosie - posted on 11/19/2010

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yeah i know erin! i wonder how the hell they can do an amnio with a child that big. i know it's possible to have a huge kid-loureen anyone?? but it just seems odd that they would even consider taking a 36 weeker. why not wait until 38 at least if they're worried about it's size? i just don't get it.

Ez - posted on 11/19/2010

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Kati, you're right in being skeptical of your friend's choice to induce for macrosomia at 36 weeks. It would be VERY unusual for a baby at that gestational age to be 9lbs (she'd be looking at close to a 12 pounder at term) and late-term growth scans are notoriously inaccurate. Not to mention the risks with amnio. Ugh.. that's just crazy.

Bonnie - posted on 11/19/2010

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Or how about the women who want to choose their child'[s birthdate, so they schedule a c-section for that reason? Just plain ridiculous.

Jenn - posted on 11/19/2010

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With my first I had to be induced at 42 weeks, and then I was induced at 38 weeks with my twins. I don't know why anyone would choose to have their baby early unless there was a medical reason.

[deleted account]

I think most of where I stand on the issue of inductions and c sections.
It blows my mind at the amount of women who choose an induction or even a c- section because they are over or even for the excuse of “convenience”.

“Do you think the process of informed consent is followed rigorously in cases of early induction or c-section?”
No I don’t. I walked into my dr’s office at 39 wks and 2 days and after and exam while I was fixing myself he was on the phone to the hospital trying to organize me to be induced that day.

Yes I do think a woman would take the induction or c-section even with all of the relevant information and knowing all the risks associated with it. Just look at how many American women give birth before their due date.

“I haven't personally heard of such cases happening in our public system, though that's not to say it doesn't. But I wonder if the health care system plays a role in letting patients dictate the treatment and management option”
I have heard of this happening where I live. Not as common as private patients.

I was a public patient and they threw induction upon me. Then there were all these restrictions on top of that. I honestly do not know why a women would choose to take that path. It’s horrible and rushed and it’s not natural.

Rosie - posted on 11/19/2010

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well, not at 36 weeks i don't think it's a good idea. a woman today at work said her daughter was having an amnio done today to see if the babies lungs were mature enough for delivery right now she's 36 weeks. they estimate the baby to be over 9 lbs right now. i dont' know, part of me gets that situation, she'd probably end up having a c section with a child that enormous left to go full term, but still it rubs me the wrong way.

my last 2 children were induced. vinnie was 40 w 1 day and i had an appointment. his heartrate would go up to the 200's for the last 2 months of my pregnancy. this time was no exception. i was already 3 cm dialated, and so i asked. they said yes. i feel that it was medically not really necessary, but favorable-yes.

with lucas i was induced at 39 weeks 1 day. they figured he was big, but i had no medical need to get him out of me other than my absolute misery. once again i was dialated 3-4 cm, 50% effaced and ready to go. so they induced.

my doctor said they would absolutely not induce before 39 weeks. i do find it kindof unethical that a doctor would induce before 39 weeks if there are no medical reasons. to me 39 weeks was reasonable, to others it might not be i guess. maybe it's just cause i feel secure with my doctors advice that i feel it's ok.

Ez - posted on 11/19/2010

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I've got no interest in taking choice away from birthing women. And I'm not talking about any of the examples you lovely ladies have given. Previous birth trauma, twins, SPD, GD, Pre-E, and mental illness are all real issues that can complicate pregnancy and birth.



This article is dealing more specifically with social inductions or elective c/s before the due date. Maybe there is family coming into town and they want the baby born while they're there. Or the EDD is on someone else's birthday, and they want to be sure baby isn't born on that day. Or, of course, just being sick of being pregnant.



For me, these will never be good enough reasons to jeopardise a baby's start in the world. The last 6ish weeks of my pregnancy were horrendous. I was so huge I could no longer drive because for me to fit behind the wheel needed the chair so far back I couldn't reach the pedals lol. I was in the middle of a disgusting heatwave, where we had weeks on end of 40-44C temperatures. I had terrible preggo insomnia, and didn't go to sleep before 5am every night. And the list goes on and on. It was rough, but would never have justified early delivery IMO.



Edited to add: The problem with being comfortable with induction or c-section at 37-38wks is that you may actually be only 35-36wks. And the odds of a baby born at that gestational age needing an admission to NICU or SCN are relatively high.

Corinne - posted on 11/19/2010

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I'm gobsmacked that women will actually choose to do this AND that the fact that they CAN choose to do this. I carried both of mine for 42 weeks before my midwives advised me to go into hospital to be induced, something which I didn't really want to do. Yes, it was uncomfortable, sometimes painful, waddling around like a fat penguin, but that's pregnancy! Nobody said it was easy or pretty. If you can't handle it, don't get pregnant! Grrrrr!

[deleted account]

Bonnie here they define 37 weeks as full term, that is why they held me off until then - that and my health took a drastic turn for the worse a couple of days before then.

I think if you've had previous children who have had issues it isn't really elective induction or c-section, our previous history has to be taken into account when deciding on the best route to take for the individual. The people I have issue with are people like a friend of mine who elected to have a c-section as she was too afraid of the pain of labour - her words not mine, I cannot understand that you would rather have major surgery than a few hours (a couple of days tops) of pain by labouring with your child.

ME - posted on 11/19/2010

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I had a scheduled c-sect. at 39 weeks with mayah...she weighed 8 lbs 6 oz...I had serious complications trying to give birth to her older brother, and it seemed like the best option for our family. I think that these things should be left up to women and their docs. I've never heard of a doctor giving into pressure from the mom before...that's kind of crazy!

Joanna - posted on 11/19/2010

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I was induced with Eva 5 days before my due date, for a few reasons. 1) I had SPD and it felt like my pelvis was breaking in half, I couldnt move in bed without help, etc. 2) I was suffering from depression and wanted back on the only drug that helped (and isn't seen as safe in pregnancy). And 3) my midwife brought up the fact that I was group b positive, have fast labors, and lived over an hour away from the hospital... With group b you have to have a certain amount of antibiotics before the baby is born. So with all that we induced. And part of me regrets it because of Evas health issue, wondering if that caused it.

I'm all for these things if medically necessary... We all know the end sucks, but why risk babys health? I wish I hadn't.

Becky - posted on 11/19/2010

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Well, I was over being pregnant by about 30 weeks! Earlier than that with my first, because I puked daily for almost the entire 37 weeks I was pregnant with him! But there was no way I would've gotten induced just because I was over being pregnant! Or a c-section. Especially a c-section. I was induced at 37 weeks with my first, like Toni, because I had Pre-e. He was healthy, but very tiny. I don't recall anyone ever telling me that there were risks to him being induced at that point. In our case, I would have opted for induction anyways, because we were both better off if he was delivered. But I would've been pretty pissed if he'd had some problems and no one had told me they were a possibility!
I think that except when there is a medical reason, inductions before the due date are irresponsible.

[deleted account]

Well, considering I was induced w/ twins at 37 weeks and scheduled my son's c-section at 38 weeks 5 days.... maybe I shouldn't answer. ;)

It is standard (here at least) to not schedule c-sections merely for convenience (though VBAC's are not an option) and it's pretty difficult to get them to consent to a c-section prior to 39 weeks.

I do not agree w/ scheduling an induction or c-section merely for the reason that someone is 'over it', but if there are extenuating circumstances... I'm all for it at the 37-38 week mark.

~Jennifer - posted on 11/19/2010

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I had an elective C-section 9 days before my daughter's due date. She was due 3/21/07 and we did the C on 3/12/07.

I opted for the elective C as i had already had one child die at birth several years earlier, and my son had a stroke @ birth (resulting in an emergency c-section) 2 years prior.

I simply wasn't taking any chances with my third and final child, and in that, opted for an elective C.

Sarah - posted on 11/19/2010

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I don't think women should be induced before they are full term (40 weeks).
I was induced with my youngest when I was 14 days overdue. I don't really see a problem with that.

Yes, the last few weeks of pregnancy are a pain in the arse, but I don't think it's a good enough reason to be induced.

I'm certainly not anti inductions or C-sections, I think they have their place, and are necessary at times. They shouldn't be used for no reason or for reasons of convenience.

Amanda - posted on 11/19/2010

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shame on any Dr who will perform a c-section or induction prior to the due date because i a patient is "over it". rediculous

Kate CP - posted on 11/19/2010

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I think it's stupid to induce for anything other than legitimate medical reasons. I also think it's stupid to have a c-section just because one doesn't want to push a baby out. Part of being a mom is being selfless which means we forgo comfort sometimes.

Bonnie - posted on 11/19/2010

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I think the main problem is that doctors always say, or at least they do here, that around 38 weeks is considered full term, so not only do they not hesitate as much when it comes to delivering at that point, but some mothers go for it because of that. I don't think an early c-section or induction should be given just because the mother is tired of being pregnant. There should be a reason for it. I was induced with my second son at 37.5 weeks for health purposes. I'm kind of shocked to read that a pregnancy at 37+ and an 8 lb baby produced respiratory problems and had to be taken to the NICU.

Sara - posted on 11/19/2010

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No, I absolutely do not think being "over it" is a reasonable request for induction. I was induced for a medical reason, but my doctor took the time to explain the risks to me and ultimately left a little bit of the decision for when I would be induced up to me. It had to happen before 40 weeks, but he gave me a window to chose. I was scared because of all the things that can go wrong with induction, and I would think that any reasonable person, if educated appropriately, would not opt to do this if it wasn't medically indicated. Honestly, I just can't believe there are doctors willing to do this for any non-medical reason. That's just irresponsible and I would think would make them liable if something did go wrong.

Jessica - posted on 11/19/2010

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No, I don't think they should induce early because women are sick of being pregnant. Suck it up, its only a couple more weeks! I also don't think many doctors inform women of the risks of these things- early inductions or c sections. And even if the women were well informed, I am sure there are still some who would do it anyway, sadly.

The problem too is so many doctors are induction-happy. They will find a reason to push it, and even many of the "medical reasons" they list are often crap. For example, the "big baby" excuse or mom is too small (for c sections).

[deleted account]

I live In the UK the same as Toni so here women can only be induced from 10-14 days after your due date depending on where you live, unless there's a medical reason which means early inducing would be safer.

I don't agree with inducing a woman because she simply wants to have the baby earlier as many induced labours end in an assisted or c-section delivery.

[deleted account]

I find that really disturbing, not only that woman are prepared to risk their babies health but that the doctors are too. The only reason for early delivery should be health reasons, either for baby or for mum.

I was induced at 37 weeks but that was because I was really ill with Pre-Eclampsia and had been since 34 weeks, the hospital were really keen to hold me off until 37 weeks because it reduced risk to my baby and I was happy for them to do so. I was terrified I would need an emergency c-section early because I knew the risks. Luckily my medication managed to maintain my symptoms for those 3 weeks and my son was born perfectly healthy at 37 weeks weighing 5lb 6 1/2 oz with a NVD.

I would never opt to have an early birth, even with my son being born at 37 weeks there were risks to his development but my health superceded them and the risks to my health (and as such my babies health) were worse than an early delivery.

I know that here they allow women to go to 42+ weeks (but never over 43 weeks) before induction, and I do feel for those women but I would always rather them have a chance to go into labour naturally first, as inductions often fail leading to c-sections being needed.

Sal - posted on 11/19/2010

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i am stunned that women are able to choose to have the baby early, i know when i was a almost a week overdue, living 120km from the maternity hospital and having a tough time with the heat (45+) i had to beg to be induced, and they still made me wait until i was a full week over.....with my last i was induced on my due day for special convieniece reasons ( my parents came to baby sit- over 600km and my mum got so ill she was airlifted out, i had my baby that day before my dad had to go so he could look after my son and daughter, (i'm not selfish, he was told to stay put until they knew where she was being sent, it was possible she would of been moved before he arrived to meet her) i don't think that unless there is a medical reason you should be allowed to be induced or have a c section early. I'm sure there is an exception to every case but they should be an oddity not a increasing trend. on this note i can't imagine why a woman would choose a c- section with out a medical reason, but i am a whimp when it comes to operations and have 3 times refused an epidural so no c-section for me...

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