Intervention

?? - posted on 11/30/2009 ( 9 moms have responded )

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http://www.aetv.com/intervention/index.j...



I've been watchin this show for quite awhile now - I've probably only missed a hand full of episodes since it began. I find the show to be fascinating (I wish it were longer and went a lil more indepth too) and I find the stories of the people to be inspiring and scary. I dislike the fact that TV is 'benefitting' from these people's illnesses but I see they get help too.



I was an addict and a lot of it clicks on some level - the addiction aspect. I've been clean since August 11, 2001 and watching Intervention sometimes it's a lil reminder to me of how I COULD HAVE turned out - and wow am I ever glad that I was never even remotely as bad as the people on the show.



Tonight is the season premiere of Intervention and Hoarders (which documents and tries to help people who are in dire need from their hoarding habits), I was just wondering if anyone else watches the show? If you have what do you think of it? Have you ever been a part of an intervention? Do you think they're bogus? Thoughts on the whole intervention topic?

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Charlie - posted on 12/01/2009

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Addiction is a disease and often a symptom of mental illness including anxiety disorders, unipolar and depression , bipolar depression, schizophrenia, and borderline and other personality disorders.
For those people who's addiction stems from mental illness it is not a choice and majority dont know they have a mental illness .
I think a lot of people are under the impression that addicts must be on drugs or alcohol and that could not be further from the truth , people can form addictions to anything from the before mentioned to food , coffee , sex ,certain people ,crime ,porn , TV , money , gambling , power , status ,computers , even sun tanning the list is endless and all are dangerous to a persons health and well being at the point of addiction .
Addiction also does not discriminate age , sex , color , religion or wealth .

Ive know addicts who are the stereotype low economic bracket , no job blah , blah , blah and ive know addicts who are CEO's of major telephone companies addicted to heroin , lawyers addicted to pot , and high ranking navy officers who took ecstasy regularly , each of them able to conduct their lives without outsiders knowing any different .

And then there are those who stood no chance and were born into addiction , those who's culture breeds addiction ( Australia has a terrible binge drinking culture ) and it has been said that addiction could be genetic .

I hate the stereotype that is portrayed of addicts its ignorant and blind , ignoring the type of addict that goes against the stereotype gives those addicts freedom to a certain extent as people wont assume anything as they just dont fit the mold .

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Sara - posted on 12/02/2009

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Having worked with addicts for several years, I think it can safely be said that MOST addicts are self-medicating. So, good for you that you're not mentally ill or didn't experience significant trauma during your development, but addiction is not a sign of weakness, it's a unhealthy coping mechanism that people turn to when they haven't been taught appropriate ways to deal with things.

?? - posted on 12/01/2009

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I think the support is a huge motivation too. I know there have been a few of the people who have NOT WANTED to go but went because they didn't want to lose this or that or someone in particular - they just figured they'd do it to keep them happy - not that they actually had to quit - they could do 30 days, say they're good and then go back to it...



There was one guy who ABSOLUTELY REFUSED to go. He was SO RUDE and SO MEAN to his whole family and the crew and Jeff the interventionist. He even tried to escape the intervention and in turn was arrested for public intoxication and he had the choice of going to jail or going to treatment so he went to treatment and he isn't ADDICTED anymore but he still drinks sometimes and smokes weed sometimes but his mother got the help that SHE needed in order to let him go and deal with his own shit. She supports his 'recovery' but she no longer feels the need to lie to herself about her responsibility or her part in his addiction.



There was another woman, she was an alcoholic for YEARS and YEARS she lost her kids she used to be an actress and she went to treatment thinking she would still be ok to drink sometimes and she found out that she couldn't do it it had to be NO ALCOHOL and her kids were the reason she got sober.



The one interventionist, Jeff, he is an alcoholic and he relapsed last year after years of being sober and he went on hiatus (sp?) from the show to get treatment for himself.





I think the show has a good point - I think it is a way to show people that even if you're kicking the shit out of your own mother to prove that she didn't steal your heroin... there's hope for you.

[deleted account]

I think interventions can work...Although they don't always. I think one of the reasons the show has been successful is that there's an underlying motivation with some of these people and they actually *want* to quit. I mean, think about it...They know they're taking place in a "documentary about addiction." They know they're addicts. They know what they're doing is wrong, and often they have lucid points in the filming prior to the invervention in which they moan about how effed up things have gotten for them. They're crying out for someone to set some boundaries, to help them, and then in swoops an intervention team with a way out. I'm sure some of them have refused the help. And I know from watching a few episodes that some of them leave treatment or relapse. So maybe that isn't always the case. But I think a lot of the people on that show are already at the stage of recognizing that they're addicts or they wouldn't participate in the first place.



I don't watch it very often because it's really depressing. I don't do well with really depressing stuff, especially not recently. The things that people do to themselves and one another completely blow my mind.



I have a certain sympathy for addicts, but also a conviction that there's always a possibility for change. The person has to really, really want it-and no amount of someone else wanting it for them is going to fix the problem. They have to want it themselves, they have to be willing to put in the work, and they have to have the opportunity as well. I don't think they can do it alone.

?? - posted on 12/01/2009

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I agree that the intervetion doesn't necessarily mean that it will make an addict change. What it does is allow the addict and the co-dependants a venue to put down some healthy boundaries, some absolute consiquences that previously were not in place. It gives everyone involved and affected by the addiction to voice their position and in some cases, that is what is needed for the people involved - not JUST the addict - but the co-dependants as well.



I agree that the addict has to want to change, and I think that even if they don't want to change - hearing your entire family say "I love you but you're on your own kiddo" is enough for them to just say "UUUGGGHHH FINE I'LL GO" just to shut them up, they figure they'll go for a couple days, amuse their family - figure the consiquences are bogus if they go and 'give it a try' they will come back from it beating this whole trickery - only to get there and see that they really can be happier. There are some people it won't work for because it's easier to not change - but for some people it's just what they need.



What always shocks the shit outta me is the obvious manipulation that the families don't realize they're being manipulated by. Addicts are usually liars and theives... it really blows me away when the family really thinks that the addict won't lie to them.



There was one I saw where the chick made her own mother undress down to nothing just to prove that she hadn't taken her bag of heroin. She was beating up her own mother and making her take off her clothes shirt, pants, bra, panties, everything just for the daughter to find the bag of heroin on her bedstand where she put it.



I would probably incapacitate my daughter if she ever tried to pull that shit with me.

Jocelyn - posted on 12/01/2009

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I use to love that show, then I became an addict and now I can't watch it without getting horrendously emotional. I had a mini-intervention (three of my closest friends and my boss that I am really close with). It worked for me, it made me realize what I was actually doing. But it wouldn't have worked if I wasn't already in that place where I needed to be. The only person that has any say is the addict themselves. If they are not ready, then of course the intervention will not work. But if the timing is good, and they are already at their bottom, then knowing that there are so many ppl that care for them might give them the motivation to clean up.

Sara - posted on 12/01/2009

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One of the most distrubing Intervention epidsodes I have ever seen is one where a girl was addicted to huffing compressed gas duster (like you use on your computer keyboard). A lot of those people are so damaged, it just makes me depressed, I can't watch it.



I don't know if I necessarily agree with Dana and Loureen though...Interventions are meant to create the users bottom. I think family and friend's have every right to say "No more" and give them one last chance before they cut them out of their lives and stop supporting that person's addiction. I do agree that the only person who can really help is the addict themselves, but I understand why people get desperate enough for an intervention.

Charlie - posted on 11/30/2009

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i havent seen it .
I have been part of an intervention for my drug and alcohol problem as a young adult did it work ? NO ,why? because i was the only person that could have dragged me out of that dark place , for me it was a case of i dont give a fuck about anyone , anything including myself and i sure as hell couldn't care less what others thought including my friends and family who all stuck by me anyway , i dont think a person can understand what its like to be an addict or the mentality they have unless they have been there its a dark and scary world where i found myself trying to end it at one point , its depression to the extreme ( although you think its " having fun " ) .

I think a person has to want to do it for themselves they have to find a bigger more meaningful picture or scare themselves shit less which is what happened to me , i stopped when i nearly killed 3 of my best friends and my fiance in a horrible crash , its one thing to hurt yourself its another whole different game when you hurt your loved ones .

I dont think interventions work BUT i do look back at that time in my life and i know those people are are my true friends and that my family did care ( as much as i thought the opposite ) i talk everyday with those friends they will forever and always be more than just my friends and i am thankful for everything they did for me including my family .

Dana - posted on 11/30/2009

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I don't watch it, I don't think interventions work out unless the person really wants help. My father is a recovering addict and I can't stand to watch shows like that. The people make me want to scream "Grow up, get a life, boo fuckin hoo."

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