Is five too soon to start school?

Charlie - posted on 08/31/2010 ( 45 moms have responded )

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Compared to most other western European countries, English pupils are extremely early starters in the classroom.

While compulsory education begins in England at the age of five (with many children actually starting at four), in countries such as Sweden, Denmark and Finland, school doesn't begin until the age of seven.

English children are ploughing through a fixed curriculum while their continental counterparts are still ploughing up the kindergarten sandpit or playing at home.

But which system delivers the best results?
This far-reaching question has been raised by the Cambridge-based Primary Review which is scrutinising how primary education is organised. And its conclusion challenges the idea that an early start has long-term advantages.

"The assumption that an early starting age is beneficial for children's later attainment is not well supported in the research and therefore remains open to question," says the report.

So why do English schoolchildren start at five, when almost everyone else in Europe starts later?

Apart from the Netherlands and Malta, the only other education systems beginning at five are Scotland and Wales (with Northern Ireland even earlier at four).

The origin of such an early start, introduced in 1870, had little to do with education, says the Primary Review report.

Entering full-time education at such a tender age meant reducing the malign influence of Victorian feckless parents - it was about child protection and social conditioning rather than learning.

And it was an attempt to appease suspicious employers, who were worried that starting any later would remove their supply of juvenile workers. An early start meant an early school leaving age.
The result remains with us - and as a consequence one of the most distinctive characteristics of English schoolchildren is how little time they spend with their family.
Children are full time in school up to three years earlier than in Scandinavia - and the summer holidays in England and Wales are shorter than anywhere else in the European Union.

And the pressure on schools is now to become "extended schools" which would create an even longer day, with optional activities before and after school hours.

But this is far from straightforward territory. If children were not in school, what would be the impact on working parents? Long hours in childcare are already a reality for many pre-school children.

Last year's teachers' conferences heard concerns that children were spending so little time with their own families that they were showing signs of aggression and de-socialisation, taking their behaviour from their peer group rather than absent adult role models.

But what does it mean for education standards?
One of the most intriguing statistics from international comparisons is the lack of relationship between hours in the classroom and educational achievement.

Finland, a global superstar in education terms, is consistently among the top performers. But it is also at the very bottom of the league in terms of the hours spent in the classroom.

Finnish pupils start formal education at seven and then enjoy 11-week summer holidays - and they end up with the highest educational standards in Europe.

Poland, a rapid-climber in international education league tables and overtaking England at reading skills, is also another country where pupils do not start until the age of seven.

There is another egalitarian argument for starting school early. Pupils from poorer homes, with parents who are less able to help their learning, might be held behind if they didn't start lessons until six or seven.

Level playing field

But a rather sobering set of statistics published by the government earlier this year showed that the length of time spent in school does little to level the playing field.

When pupils start school at five, the children of more affluent families are already ahead. But this "attainment gap", instead of closing gets wider at each stage up to the age of 16. As every year passes in school, the results of the richest and poorest grow further apart.

There have been some other cross-winds of concern about children starting school before they are ready. The government has highlighted summer-born children, whose parents could now be given the right to delay entry by a year.

It followed research showing that the disadvantage of being the youngest in a year group persisted right through primary and secondary school. While 60.7% of September-born girls achieved five good GCSEs, only 55.2% of August-born girls achieved the same.

The Primary Review, taking an overview of the evidence, suggests that there is no clear link between quantity and quality in education.

Or put another way, the early bird doesn't necessarily become the bookworm.

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[deleted account]

Last year, I was upset that my then 4 year old, who would be turning 5 just 8 weeks into the school year, was not allowed to start school until this year. Some of you might even remember my worried posts on these boards...I was also very worried about his ability to adjust socially given our decisions not to enroll him in day care (b/c I stay home).

This year, I am extraordinarily grateful that he got the extra year at home, and even more grateful that we decided to skip out on preschool.



What did we do all year? We played. Sure, I taught him things--he knows how to read, I taught him at HIS request, he knows simple math, he knows how to conduct experiments, scientific method, he knows a good bit about structural integrity and physics (he wants to be an architect). All of that (except the reading), he learned only by playing.

He is also very confident. I noticed that many of the children in the classroom crying on the first day, were kids that had been in preschool, which baffles me a bit, but my son was confident and ready to take on school. Even now, three weeks into the year, the children who have the most behavior issues were in preschool before. It completely contradicts the common hypothesis. I am NOT saying that preschool is bad, but that there are benefits to more free play.

[deleted account]

I've been thinking about this, and Loureen brings up a very good question. Creative or Free Play has long been proven to stimulate parts of the brain that are associated with imagination, problem solving, and self discipline (I forget the actual terms for the brain parts, but I remember reading about this in college and a few times since).

Children may be "ready" for school, and able to perform and adjust to the structure and curriculum at 5 yrs old, BUT are we robbing them of the ability to develop further those parts of the brain, which, as it happens, are not stimulated at all by compulsory learning techniques used in most American and (I am assuming) British schools?

In other words, is it possible that the children in the more advanced countries are more advanced because they have better developed the parts of the brain that help them to govern themselves, solve problems, and come up with creative ideas (through the additional 2 years of free play, which stimulates that development), whereas the children in our schools may have learned a greater QUANTITY of information from school, but lack the development necessary to "think outside the box" so to speak, and form original ideas on a very grand scale due to the limited free play they are alloted from age 5 up?

Amie - posted on 09/01/2010

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I think it depends on the kids as well as the school that the parents choose.



I know my kids school leans heavily towards learning through play for Pre-K, Kindergarten and parts of the first few grades.



For us this is fine, our 3 year old just started Pre-K today. She loved it. =)

Kate CP - posted on 09/01/2010

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The problem is that standardized learning DOESN'T WORK. No two adults learn and absorb things the same way, why do we assume that children do? Children learn by experiencing life and mimicking others. Sitting children at tables or desks and lecturing to them doesn't work. It doesn't work for adults and it doesn't work for kids.
"...education is a natural process carried out by the human individual, and is acquired not by listening to words, but by experiences in the environment.” - Maria Montessori

Jacquie - posted on 09/01/2010

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Completely depends on the individual child. I hate polls and studies because no two kids are ever alike. Success in the education of a child depends on so many other factors, not just age. Intelligence, temperament, motivation, teachers, resources, parental involvement, etc. Weigh all of the factors and what you know of your child- then decide :-)

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[deleted account]

I wonder if it is possible to offset the ill effects of starting a compulsory curriculum too soon by insuring lots of free play time outside of classes. Like, almost as much free play as they would have gotten if they were not in school yet.
I know a lot of kids who are in so many activities outside of school they literally NEVER have time to think for themselves, much less think about what THEY would like to be doing.
Do you think it would be possible?

After reading this article and doing a little more research on it, I decided it was worth a try, so we banned TV in our house all days except for Sunday to try to get in more play time, and put limits on computer time.
This was my first step b/c TV works the brain very much in the same ways as compulsory education, so I figured he gets enough of that at school and should focus on something different at home. Obviously, I have no real way to measure the results, but it can't hurt right?

April - posted on 09/08/2010

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Amie Turnbull.... If I am correct, when in school we did this and it was called "Field Day" It was when we all went outside as a school and there were different activities set up that you could play, almost like a fair but no rides just kick ball and what not, you made shirts that had your class team on them and for lunch there was a big picnic outside!!! :o)

April - posted on 09/08/2010

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I would love to see my boys be able to have another few years to just learn things on there own... My four year old can already count to 30 (50 if he really wants to that day), do his ABC's, write his numbers 1-10 and ABC's, and knows his full name and birthday and how to write and spell his name. All this on his own time that he asks to do. Not forced, so I could see how maybe children would find learning more fun if they had a little bit more time to just try to figure it out on there own. My other son is only 6 months so as far as different learning abilities Im no there yet, but My oldest I am very proud of, he I feel can do it all. He will work on all his learning and he can play a video games like the adults can and still play outside. So he has a great mix of everything in his world right now, it's just what the parents decide to do with it all!!

Stifler's - posted on 09/07/2010

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I went to kindy at 3, preschool at 4 and grade 1 at 5 i think. Most of my grade are illiterate and on the dole or still work shit jobs while NOT going to uni. Sad really. Starting school at 7 sounds like a good idea.

Amie - posted on 09/04/2010

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My kids came home from school yesterday and something they said reminded me of this thread.

Their entire school (K-8) had play day together. In lieu of their regular classes they all got together outside and learned through play for the entire day.

Which is neat, I didn't know they did that. I know their individual classes did but not the entire school at once. lol Maybe it's something new they're trying this year.

[deleted account]

Sheesh, for a moment there I was confused until I realized that I was responding to the OTHER Christina when I last posted... ;)

Christina - posted on 09/04/2010

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Most states don't require 5 year olds to start school, umm, have you ever heard of home-schooling? A parent has a right to state they will be educating their child at home or alternative schooling, so you can't be thrown in jail. That is pure nonsense.

Anyway, it depends on a child's birthday and when they are the appropriate school age for that state. In all states I have lived, it depends on what month the child is born. It used to be if the child turned 5 before the end of the calendar year (many, many, many years ago), but now the child has to turn 5 before the beginning of the school year, which usually starts late August. Oh, btw, I know plenty of mothers who have opted to start their children in K at age 6 and I didn't see shackles around their wrists or ankles.

[deleted account]

Kindergarten is not required in many states actually. The local school board is not going door to door seeking unenrolled 5 years olds. Plain and simple, every kid is different. If a 4 year old is eligible for Kindergarten and is socially and emotionally ready, then great. Some 5 year olds are not ready. What I loved the most about my son's former preschool is that everything was all about play. Play, play, play. Oh, and the reading, writing, math, and science and mature was all built into the play. Preschool was a great foundation for Kindergarten, which my son started a few weeks ago. But he was very ready for Kindergarten based on the previous years of preschool and daycare. He went into Kinder already knowing the curriculum. We also supplement a lot of homeschooling here because he actually loves to learn. I've been doing the supplemental homeschooling since he was 3 1/2. But not all kids are at that ready to learn milestone and the parent and teacher has to take that cue. Perhaps another full year of simply playing is all that the child needs. But in so many instances, a child's veyr first exposure to any learning atmosphere is upon entering Kindergarten. Some kids will adapt well, others don't. I'm getting a kick out of the papers my son comes home with and the homework worksheets. We were doing the exact same things a year ago-the Carson Della Rosa workbooks. The primary lined paper to write his name, the math matching. I'm loving his Kindergarten and I now my son does well. It's the right enviornment for him.

Cindy - posted on 09/03/2010

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Being in Canada, western canada to be exact. I look at this issue as nothing more then Glorified Babysitting. My little Man can not go to school in Western Canada until he is 5. I was wondering around this site trying to get a feel for What Junior needed to know to qualify for Kindegarden.
HOLY CRAP is the first thing I have to say.
There are "Parents" out there that are expecting children to KNOW HOW TO READ before they go to school. WHAT THE HECK? They are our BABIES??? Children...Where is the time to play and have fun. If Jr can read before Kindegarden what is the Teacher going to teach? man o man.
As it turns out - thank goodness - out here Babies get to be babies. Junior needs to be able to print his name - not perfectly - but just so they know who's page is whos. Junior needs to be "Interested" in learning how to read. And Junior needs to be able to recognize the alphabet - not write it out - in order.

Thank goodness. Still, it's glorified babysitting so that parents can go back to work earlier.

[deleted account]

Are you sure that it's most states, Christina? I thought it was closer to a 50/50 split on which ones do or don't require it. Unfortunately I don't have the link on that though I'm sure it's easy to find. I know over here a child is not required to be enrolled in school until the school term that starts after their 6th bday.

Tah - posted on 09/02/2010

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They have added a birthday cut off for kindergartenin the 2 states that i have lived in, in PA and VA if your child hasnt turned 5 by the time school starts in Sept they start at 6, it seems to me that it puts them behind, it's fine for parents who gave birth between jan-sept, but it's unfair to the others, all of my children are born after, in oct and dec. i started school before i was 6 and graduated at 17 and am none the worse for it. The k i attended actually used to test you at 4 and if you passed you were accepted so we were all 16 and 17 when we graduated for the most part if you attended that school or schools with the same policy

[deleted account]

Kindergarten is not a requirement in my state. I don't know if you are referring to me (probably not) but I want to point out I was debating on starting school at 3. She'll start by age 4, even if it's just a part time program. But the free public pre-k program is 5 full days a week, which I'm leery about.

C. - posted on 09/02/2010

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JUST A SIDE NOTE, HERE: I saw a couple posts about women in the US who weren't sure when their child would be starting school b/c they hadn't yet decided if they would start at the usual 4 or 5, or even later.. Most states REQUIRE ALL 5 YEAR OLDS to enroll in Kindergarten, so PLEASE check the laws in the state where you live and be sure your child is enrolled somewhere b/c yes they can get you and POSSIBLY throw you in jail, depending on how lenient their laws are. But most likely at least a court hearing. Anyway, just wanted to mention that for those who aren't sure just yet what age to put your children in school.

Meghan - posted on 09/02/2010

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My daughter will be 4 when she starts school. She would of started preschool at 3 years turning 4 but she missed the cut off line due to her birthday being oct. 25th. It just depends on the the kid and type of school they go to. I am starting mine out in preschool.. Good luck!

Meghan - posted on 09/01/2010

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I think it IS too soon...but it's cheaper than daycare and they get to socialize and learn so meh.

Christina - posted on 09/01/2010

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I agree that it might depend on an individual child's readiness for school, but looking back my daughter was not ready for the social aspect of school.

My daughter is 15 now and she entered school at age 5. She was a summer baby and turned 5 a week before school started. Although she did not have any initial adjustment problems, her problems came later when she had difficulty dealing with social issues that most of the kids encountered who were significantly (sometimes over a year older) were dealing with, such as dating, premarital sex, and drugs & alcohol. She was not and still is not emotionally and socially mature enough to deal with her peers.

I believe this may be a reason to make sure that children are with their proper age groups when entering school. Perhaps a universal standard needs to be imposed that states that all children need to be the same age - all 6 or 5, or whatever. I don't have the answer. All I know is that the disparity of ages of children within the US in one grade has an long-term affect on socialization.

As for my son, he won't be entering K until he's 6 years old and I'm glad. Although he goes to day-care/pre-school, the nature of structured learning bothers me. He's not ready to sit at a desk for several hours of a day to learn concepts at this point. He needs to play, draw, and express himself visually and artistically. Kindergarten won't allow him to do this and by the time he gets there, he'll be ready.

As for Sharon's remarks - I don't know what to say about such comments. Except to state the cycle of poverty is hard to break and parents without formal education find it difficult to have the resources to teach their children the importance of education. To state that they wish to be in that predicament is to make a sweeping generalization and is not an open-minded approach to dealing with a social issue.

[deleted account]

Thanks for posting this, and Kelly thanks for the brain information you've given. I've been pondering this. My daughter will be 3 in May. Most of my friends have started their children in a pre-school program at age three. Our public pre-school starts at age 4 and is a 5 day a week, all day program. I've really been agonizing over what I should do. I want her in the pre-k 4 program, because they feed right into the kindergarten program she'd be in. But going from being at home all day to being at school all day is a big jump. Which is why I was considering a putting her somewhere at age 3 for just a few days a week (like everyone else has been doing). Maybe I'll just keep her home that extra year before pre-school, but I'll do a little more of my own research before doing so. =)

Jenni - posted on 09/01/2010

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@Sharon which 'races' do you consider to be uneducated?
Also, you don't think that the 'uneducated trailer trash' are uneducated b/c of lack of resources and ignorance b/c of their environment? I mean sure there are the 'exceptions' who are able to break free of their mould but those are the exceptions. Generally it's very difficult for someone to break free of the only life they've known.
I agree with you that it does give children from impoverished/abusive/broken/or generally bad environments at least the same chance as other children.

Sharon - posted on 09/01/2010

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the countries that start later - have a very different social attitude than the other countries mentioned.

You also don't hear much about psycho drug addicted parents from those countries.

I think the victorian model of school is still applicable in this day & age because of our rampant trailer trash (applies to all uneducated races who insist on remaining uneducated) population.

WE, here, on this forum, are the minority - well most of us, in that we are moderately educated and are willing to expand our thoughts and take in new ideas.

This is not true of a very large portion of the american population.

Jenni - posted on 09/01/2010

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I'm not very knowledgable on the subject b/c my kids aren't school-aged yet. But as far as I know in JK and SK kids are playing with playdoh, drawing pictures, playing with toys, building blocks and socializing with each other. I may be wrong but from what I remember they weren't sitting at desks yet and being lectured. It was more like a daycare setting. Of course they are being taught their alphabets, numbers, shapes etc. but it's all through play. And the benefit of it is early socialization. I realize that we as moms also socialize our kids in playgroups or other activities but some moms do less than others. Early schooling also teaches independence, structure, discipline, behaviour expected of them outside the home.
Now having said all that... these are things that can be taught to them just as easily by their parents. Unfortunately, we live in a world where some parents are far less attentive to their child's education at home than others. For these children it is definitely beneficial to start school early to give them the same opportunities as children of attentive parents.
Like i said earlier... in our economy, and i'm mostly speaking about the north american economy, not all parents have the luxury of being able to work and afford daycare. For these parents having their children start school earlier is essential.
I don't think it should be manditory to start school at age 4... I think 5 is an appropriate age. I don't know if i just think that way b/c that's what i grew up knowing or if i just had a good experience starting kindergarten. I still remember how excited and grown up i felt to be going to school and how many new friends i met. I still remember snack time, all of our classroom pets, the rice table, the playhouse, my best friend who would only talk to people through me, hearing a new joke of the day and getting my turn to be 'special me'.

C. - posted on 09/01/2010

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I mean, I guess it's quite a possibility. There are some people with advanced intelligence coming from other countries, so I wouldn't say it's not true. I suppose that very well could be why. But like I said, the people that I know that started early, did exceptionally well in school and are successful now.

With that being said, I will say that when we (brother, sisters and myself) started school, we were ahead of what they were teaching. But I've always thought that our school systems were lacking a bit where we got stationed. So, maybe it's not that the children should start later, but that the schools should up their ante?

Charlie - posted on 09/01/2010

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Ok i get that a lot of children say they are ready and do well in their schools some even do well overall by their countries standards but do you think perhaps if children were to wait the standard of the entire countries education would increase to meet these countries who are well above uk , America , Canada and Australia ?

C. - posted on 09/01/2010

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"Christina if you had read the entire post you would have seen that the countries that start at 7 years are amongs the top performers in the world , they have the highest reading age in the world ( from another article ) and have the highest education standards ."

Loureen, I didn't have the time to finish reading the entire article. But from all the people that I have met through the years, starting earlier was better. The ones that started at 4 or 5 actually had better success when they got older. And I am looking at how my niece, nephews and my own son are and how intelligent they are. You're right, it is beyond our community or country. But I am saying from what *I* have seen. And really, how can anyone on this thread debate it if the stats are the way they appear? If that's all you're going to say about it, then I guess everyone that has the opinion that schooling earlier in life is better, would really be wrong. Right?

[deleted account]

My daughter was five starting..she has always been advanced and was asking to go to main stream school at 3 but i sent her to playschool which kept for going as she always wanted to learn.Shes been in daycare school from one..She could spell by 3 and all sorts.I do however have to say i found it very hard going for her even though she is bright so much was expected of the children and a test was given at the end of the first year and a few up to then..i found it way to much for five year olds.She did excellent and the teacher had no problems with her or her work but i was shocked,even the school written report at the end of the year..i couldn't believe it was written for a five year old.To much expected at such a young age but thats the norm in Ireland for school goers actually from 4.

Whether or not we have bright children or children learning at there age pace, there not geniuses and there in school to learn not go to school already knowing it all.

My daughter had words to colour each night and she knew all the words in that sentence one night so she coloured them all.The next day in school she stumbled on one and the teacher said in a stern voice "come on now you coloured it,you must know it"which made my child go into herself and was afraid after that to answer things in fear of getting something wrong.I was mad,come on ease up, there young children in there first year of school..

Sarah - posted on 09/01/2010

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My eldest daughter is a "summer baby" so she started school when she 4.
I think she was totally ready for school to be honest.

I want to point out as well that in Reception, it's not like they're sat at a desk reciting the times table for hours at a time or anything. A lot of the day IS made up of play. Many of the activities are set up as games that actually teach as you play etc.

Each year they move up through the school, they lose a little more play time in the classroom, and get more structured lessons. (at least in my daughters school, I assume that most UK schools are similar though)

So I think 5 is just the right age.

Johnny - posted on 08/31/2010

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Depends on the child, but I generally agree with Tara's post. I think younger children learn very well through play. Given the social need for kids to be in care due to so many parents working, my suggestion would be that kids start a non-compulsory play school type thing around 4 that is very unstructured. And slowly as they grow towards age 6, they introduce a bit more structure until they start real "school" at 6 or 7. That way all children have access to higher level care and learning environments.

It would be ideal, to me, to keep kids at home until they are ready to enter school at the right age for them, but that just isn't feasible in today's economy.

Jenny - posted on 08/31/2010

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My daughter started public school at 4 with no preschool first and 3 years later is still at the top of her class. The logical conclusion is...it depends on the child.

Some are ready, some are not.

Rosie - posted on 08/31/2010

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yeah, i guess i don't see my kids doing much more than playing. so far vinnie has been practicing writing his name, and his teacher has him following simple instructions by cutting out shapes and gluing them where the paper says to glue them. he's also learned how to open a banana (his biggest thrill so far, lol!), and his teacher made me go in front of the class and do the sprinkler while he (the teacher) played the drums with his hands, lol!! they are playing, learning proper manners-he's turned into mr polite, today he raised his hand when he wanted to tell me something, lol-, and throwing in a bit of educational curriculum in the mix. i have no problem with his school so far, they don't seem to want to make him grow up to much.

[deleted account]

I think 5 is a good age to start school. My 5 yr old has just started elementary school and he was definately ready for it. I don't think 5 is too young for school, but I do think it's way too young to be doing any serious learning. I think school should be more about social interaction and learning through play for the first few years. I prefer the Kindergarten style of learning we have here where the kids are mostly using glue sticks and paint rather than proper schoolwork. The serious curriculum starts too young for most kids in the UK and there's no evidence to suggest that they turn out any better for it. I would even go as far as to say that some kids could be learning less even if the curriculum and test scores say otherwise.

Jenni - posted on 08/31/2010

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I'm in Canada in the kids start JK (junior kindergarten) at 4. It use to be half a day but i think now they'll be going for a full day. I guess it's good for working parents who have to otherwise pay for daycare. I don't think it should be manditory however.

Tara - posted on 08/31/2010

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"...Knowledge which is acquired under compulsion has no hold on the mind. Therefore do not use compulsion, but let early education be a sort of amusement; you will then be better able to discover the child's natural bent. --Plato"

I am firm believer that early childhood education should focus on learning through play and experiences. Kids that young should be with their families. This quote from the article echoes my own feelings about this scenario of early schooling...
"Last year's teachers' conferences heard concerns that children were spending so little time with their own families that they were showing signs of aggression and de-socialisation, taking their behaviour from their peer group rather than absent adult role models. "
Children need emotional intelligence at that age far more than they need to learn to read, write or do math.
I think that some kids can handle that kind of early exposure to school, but I think most kids would benefit from staying home, in the dirt, making cookies, building confidence and self-awareness.

Rosie - posted on 08/31/2010

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i don't know. my children have both started school at age 5 and seem to be doing well. grant is a little genius, and vinnie just started, but he seems to emjoy the socialization, and he loves learning new things (at least so far, lol).
i personally like it cause it gets them out of the house faster, lol!!! JK!! (well, a little)

Nikki - posted on 08/31/2010

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I have always believed that 5 is too early to start formal education, as a pre school teacher is is obvious that children learn better through play at 4-5.

How lovely would it be for children to be given an extra couple of years to play and explore and learn about the world through their own eyes before being forced to learn about the world from a rigid curriculum that a bunch of old bureaucrat's have come up with.

Charlie - posted on 08/31/2010

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Christina if you had read the entire post you would have seen that the countries that start at 7 years are amongs the top performers in the world , they have the highest reading age in the world ( from another article ) and have the highest education standards .

The benefits rank on the world stage not just our community or country .

[deleted account]

Hmm... I don't know. I heard somewhere that boys would do a lot better in school if they didn't start formal education until they were 10..

I know for my family personally... my girls started K at 4.5. They are almost 9 (December) now and in the 4th grade. They've always been in the top of their classes, but I think that's just them... not the age. Ask me this question again when I have to put a boy in school. ;)

C. - posted on 08/31/2010

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Wow, sorry, Loureen.. Couldn't read the entire thing. BUT, no 5 is not too soon.. In fact, I think it's a little late. My niece and nephews have already started school (well the babies haven't b/c they are 1 and almost 1- but the oldest are 4, almost 4, 3 and almost 3- and they have already started, but my sisters are homeschooling them, so). But Liam will be starting no later than 4 years old, possibly 3. No way do I think that 5 is too soon.

Kate CP - posted on 08/31/2010

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Samantha is already in school and she's only 4. But, she goes to Montessori school and it's very different from your standard classroom. So I guess it depends on the kid and the type of school and how they respond to it. If Samantha hadn't responded well to school we would have held off longer.

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