Keeping dogs tied up

Nikki - posted on 09/18/2011 ( 392 moms have responded )

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Do you think it's cruel to keep dogs tied up for most of their life? Or necessary for some dogs?

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Sarah - posted on 09/20/2011

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America:
That's really out of order.
We moderate this group free of charge out our own time, we cannot be on here 24/7 just to deal with childish bickering between 2 grown women.

If you don't like the way this group is run.......feel free to leave.

Mary - posted on 09/18/2011

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How can it ever be "necessary"?

To answer the question - YES, I think it is cruel to keep a dog tied up, especially if you are leaving them outside unsupervised. If you do not have the luxury of fenced-in yard, then you need to be taking that dog outside for walks on a leash. The only time I can sort of see using a tie-out system is if you (briefly) let the dog out to take care of business, and stay at the door watching them for the duration that they are out there. It's not something I think should be done on a regular basis, but I could sort of justify it in cases of bad weather, where the owner, for whatever reason, is unable to walk the dog.

If you are unable to properly supervise and exercise your animal, than you have no business having one. Leaving a dog tied up outside for hours on end unsupervised is (to me), no different than leaving a toddler tied up outside alone.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 09/20/2011

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Settle down America.....People are volunteers to Mod these communities. They are NOT paid jobs to be here ever second. A post gets flagged, and the first Mod on to see it goes to deal with it.

Kate CP - posted on 09/28/2011

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"What is enough socialisation then?"

I'm responding to this question because it's a very good question. What *IS* enough socialization? How do you know? Well, there are the temperament tests you could go by...but, some dogs may not pass those but still be well socialized animals. As a pet trainer my rule of thumb is this:

A well socialized dog will still function normally (not salivate excessively, cower, pant, whine, whimper, bark, snap at, bite, jump up, lunge, or act "panicky") when put into a new situation.

This means if they hear a loud noise they will still startle and look around like "What the hell was that?!" but won't attempt to run away or bark or bite at the nearest person or animal. They can show interest in other dogs and humans but not be overly eager to get at them. They are calm and relaxed around humans and animals, even in noisy or unfamiliar settings. They won't become aggressive or defensive when a toy or treat is taken away. They will show defensiveness of their territory by barking at a person who approaches their territorial boundary but they won't attempt to bite the person, climb the fence, dig UNDER the fence, or be overly aggressive towards a newcomer (especially one who is invited onto the property or into the home).

If your dog exhibits any of the behaviors I listed above then you may want to look into training classes or socialization classes with a professional pet trainer. One who specializes in positive reinforcement techniques will give you the best results (and you'll have more fun, too!).

Charlie - posted on 09/21/2011

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Cats are meant to be outdoors , all animals are meant to be outdoors its just that humans have MADE them indoor creatures by introducing them to foreign country's where they havent got their natural predators to keep the population down and due to humans breeding them there are a great many more than what nature would have intended ..... now cats when outdoors in these numbers present a big risk to the native animal population especially here in Australia where natives are becoming endangered.

Humans are great at fucking the ecosystem !

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Danielle - posted on 12/12/2012

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we keep my dog tied up because we have hens in our backyard and he killed one so its to stop him going after them..but he is off the lead for bot 3 hours everyday:L

Julie - posted on 10/09/2011

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She's a good dog most of the time and I know she was abused when she was younger. She's a rescue so don't know a lot of the details, but I think it may have something to do with that since she came to us mostly trained other than that.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 10/09/2011

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Having a dog or cat pee in the house is terrible. But, there are ways to correct it.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 10/09/2011

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Julie, it sounds like your dog has behavioral issues, and needs some training. But, some dogs that are trained, will still escape when they see the chance. That usually indicates leash walking. I hope you are talking about tying your dog out for maybe 15 minutes at a time to do her business rather than all day and night. Perhaps the peeing in the house issue is an indication of a medical problem? UTI perhaps, or diabetes....diabetes usually makes them drink a lot, and in turn need to pee a lot. There are other conditions that could be the culprit, but these are the two most common. Especially if this is a newer problem. Just a suggestion.

Sal - posted on 10/08/2011

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my dogs don;t get tired up, i do lock one in the car port at night as he is still a puppy and i don;'t know where he will end up by morning as he is a bit of a huoudini, but i don;t see the issue with dogs being tired up over night or for short periods during the day, we live rural and almost every other house has a working dog (blue heeler, kelpie or colie) and they work during the day and are tired at night, it is the safest thing i think as they will chase alomost anything that moves (not attack just chase and try and muster) and lord knows where they will end up or what animal they will move..

Merry - posted on 10/08/2011

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I don't worry about w pit bull any more then a golden retriever. More dog bites are recorded for, I think collies?, then pit bulls. ANY stranger dog is a danger IMO. No mattres breed. I judge their body language, not the breed

[deleted account]

I think it's cruel to keep them tied up 24/7 even when they sleep. I know some people who only do it for short periods and I don't think that is so bad.

Julie - posted on 10/07/2011

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My dog climbs the fence if left out and pees on the floor if left in. She will wake me up at night after she pees on the floor. When we're awake, she'll go to the door and ask to be let out. Then she'll come scratch on the door to be let back in. So yes, we do keep her tied up at times, but we let her off so she can get her excercise too. Doesn't seem to bother her one bit, she'll go sit and wait to be put on the chain and gets all excited when it's time to get off of it.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 10/07/2011

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It's not the breed it's the people who raise the dog. Every pit I've met (full breed and 1/2 breed) has been very sweet and good natured. All they want is what every dog wants, A nice walk, a nice family, enough food, and a comfy place to sleep.



The only issue I've had is with my aunt's pit/ german shepard cross. As she's gotten older she's gotten territorial over my aunt. But that can happen with any breed.



Edit: I seriously can't tell you how many dobermann's I've also met who bark at you then go to sleep somewhere.

Sherri - posted on 10/07/2011

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I have to admit sorry I have heard wonderful things about Pits but I will never allow one around my kids. I don't care if they are the friendliest dog in the world.

My sister has a pit/lab mix that I doubt would harm a fly but I will never trust her. I always keep my kids well away from her.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 10/07/2011

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Yes because heaven forbid someone should have a breed they've done research on and know how to take care of because they don't have it in a certain environment. Believe it or not a lot of people own certain breeds because they love the breed and they know what to do with it.

My brother has a pit mix. This dog is the most friendly, loyal, sweet dog I've ever met. Unfortunately some people like to make judgements on the dog because of his breed. Now that's something that ticks me off

[deleted account]

Laura, some of the people out there should not even have a pet fly if I can exaggerate, LOL.

It bugs me when people just get their rise picking out a "hip" breed and can say, "oh I have a xoloitzcuintli". I'm king of the dog owners on this block. Ugh, get a clue (or yes a cat) people.

Merry - posted on 10/07/2011

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"but if you can't be bothered to walk your dog on a leash to "do his business" then perhaps you are a cat person. "

Yup! Exactly! Haha I realized I really hated taking the dog outside to the bathroom or for walks and so I'm not going to own another dog for a while until my kids are old enough to help, for now, we are a cat family and loving it :)

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 10/06/2011

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Oh and what was the mixed breed's name? I'm sure that has everything to do with lifelong chaining of dogs in backyards. "

Kitz, are you naturally this good natured to everyone or am I just extremely lucky? When was it said that these dogs were chained up for a life time? Seriously just because you don't agree with the fact that my grandfather had mainly working breeds as pets and that they were in city backyards (and as far as city backyards go this was a nice sized one since the house was slightly smaller than others in that neighbourhood) doesn't give you the right to be so rude towards me.

Kate CP - posted on 10/06/2011

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"Oh and what was the mixed breed's name? I'm sure that has everything to do with lifelong chaining of dogs in backyards."

Is it really necessary to be snarky just because some one doesn't agree with your point of view?

[deleted account]

Oh and what was the mixed breed's name? I'm sure that has everything to do with lifelong chaining of dogs in backyards.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 10/06/2011

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Kitz, you didn't know the dogs, you didn't know the families. You don't know that they were taken out into the country every weekend to have some excersize. Vets do say you can have a beagle in a town or city, but they aren't good Apartment dogs because of their distinctive bark. As long as you excersise and play with your dog the dog will be fine. Fudd got to run with Lucky- my grandfather's last beagle pretty much every weekend.

No! You're kidding me! A pointer isn't a beagle! Wow! I'd never have guessed! A GSH is still a type of hunting dog, but bred to flush out water fowl instead of rabbits. I stated that the dogs my grandfather had were happy and healthy, I never said he owned nothing but beagles. I said he owned beagles. He also owned a mixed breed between his second to last and last beagle.

Kate CP - posted on 10/06/2011

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I used to work with Blue Bonnet Beagles (Beagle rescue here in North Texas) and I have to say that any dog can do well in the city OR the country. If a Beagle gets enough exercise and attention they do very well in a city or suburban setting.

[deleted account]

These dogs do best out of town. Do some research. Talk to vets, local shelters, breeders, breed specific rescues. Beagles are so active and instinctual, they do not do well as city family pets.

Insn't a FENCED IN YARD some sort of enclosure?

A GSH is not a Beagle.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 10/06/2011

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Kitz, my mom had beagles growing up in the city and all their dogs were just fine. My grandpa took good care of all of his dogs up to the last one, a German Short Haired Pointer named Moe. My dad also had a beagle named Fudd and they live in the suburbs. Fudd was a good family dog and a good hunting dog. We kept her in the house when we didn't let her out and run in the FENCED IN YARD and she was never a trouble maker. Later on in her life my brother got a pit mix named Guy and he did keep Fudd company until my dad had to put her down since her legs hurt her so much she couldn't walk.

By the way, the beagles my granpa owned and the beagle my dad owned were also hunting dogs. But in my family we don't believe in having dogs simply to make them work for us.

[deleted account]

Beagles in town is just wrong. They're so cute and just beautiful little dogs, but people forget or just don't consider what they were bred for! Hounds do best in groups with other hounds on a farm, penned when not hunting or running with their masters. If they live alone as a "family dog", many are neurotic and driven to follow scents, dig, look for game or companions and just get into trouble. They are notorious tire-chasers too, that's why they get hit all the time.

Pens are best though, don't chain dogs up!

LadyJane - posted on 10/05/2011

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Yes that is definitely true... Before I was born my mom had a beagle. She had it out in the front yard while she was planting some flowers and it ran out into the street and got hit by a car.

It wasn't until I was 2 years old before she got another dog, by then we got a cocker spaniel instead and she never wanted to leave the yard unless she was being walked by one of the family, but we never used a leash with her, didn't need to. She never left our side when we walked.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 10/05/2011

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Beagles need fenced yards too unless you have them out in the feild. Those dogs will start running on a scent and just not want to come back.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 10/05/2011

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Thanks for clarifying Elizabeth. It sounded like you don't like fences at all for dogs....like it was owners lazy way of taking care of them letting them run loose in a protected yard.

Jane - posted on 10/05/2011

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Ideally, children and dogs should roam freely and explore, returning safely home every day for food and sleep. But we know that isn't possible these days, if it ever was. The next best choice is a large fenced yard where both can explore and play without danger.

However, there are situations where people cannot have a fenced yard, and to be honest, a fenced yard is not absolutely necessary to raise a happy and healthy dog. If it were, there would be no dogs in Manhattan.

A dog that lives indoors with its people, goes for several walks a day on a leash, and sometimes goes to a dog park can be a perfectly happy and healthy dog. Of course, I have bulldogs, who like to spend large amounts of time dozing near their people, who do not do well if out in the heat and sun for very long, and are perfectly thrilled to go on daily walks. If you have a dog that needs to run, such as the Vishlas my uncle had, then a fenced yard becomes a lot more necessary, unless you do as he did, take the dogs running three times a day. He wasn't very good at sitting still either so it was a good match.

What I find unacceptable is chaining or tying a dog outside. I know there are all sorts of reasons that people give, but if you can't be bothered to walk your dog on a leash to "do his business" then perhaps you are a cat person. Or maybe goldfish are more your speed.

Elizabeth - posted on 10/05/2011

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Plus, how many dogs in the world live a COMPLETELY happy life with apartment dwellers? They have no fenced yards. That's not necessarily what makes a good home for a dog. They can be cared for completely and effectively without a fence if you are willing to put in the time and effort....

Elizabeth - posted on 10/05/2011

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My reply was in response to the post before mine. In their subdivision they are not allowed to have fences. We have a nice colourbond fence in our back yard and we love it, especially since our dog cannot get out.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 10/05/2011

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Well, I totally disagree with not needing a fenced in yard. I am all for letting them out and just letting them run. No safer way to do that than in your own yard with a high fence for a certain amount of time.

Elizabeth - posted on 10/05/2011

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Any dog that is a pet, a part of the family, should be indoors anyway! No need for a fenced yard if your dog is in the house. Dogs are perfectly capable of living inside and being taken for walks on a lead everyday to go potty and get exercise. Look for an off-lead dog park in your area for more exercise once a week if you can. Dogs should be an important part of our lives. Sad but true... our heart is where our money is! Invest in your dog. Get proper training. Keep your dog healthy with regular vet visits. These people who throw their dogs in their backyards and forget about them, the majority of those dogs never get vaccinated, get the cheapest dog food on the market, or even just table scraps, have no training. If you get a dog that dog needs to be a priority from day 1. It's no different than having a child. It's a living creature that relies on you for it's care and you are solely responsible for.

LadyJane - posted on 10/05/2011

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However, there are laws where I live that state that any dog being outside unsupervised MUST be tied up during the time they are outside. The only time they can be untied, is when someone is out there with them to keep them from getting out of the yard. Exceptions to this are if the owner has installed an approved fenced in pet run or the dog is inside a dog cage large enough for exercise and within 10 feet from the sides of the property lines...



This law was put in place due to where this sub division is located. There's a school right across the street, there are no fences allowed except those specifically approved for dogs, so any child can walk through someone's yard and possibly get bit. They were actually going to ban these paticular homes from owning dogs of any kind, but instead came up with this compromise. The school is located right in the middle of a square block where the only way walkers can get home is by going through the yard of someone's home. There is one street that allows the buses to come through for dropping kids off, but no other cars are allowed except during non-school hours. So there's not much room to avoid going through someone's back yard. There's only about 25 houses that this law applies to and it's the only way home owners would have been allowed to have dogs.





Other in the situation I listed above, I personally wouldn't tie my dog up if I had a fenced in yard. If I didn't, I'd probably stay out with the dog until it was time to come in for the night. All the dogs I've had stayed indoors at night and when we were not home.

Kate CP - posted on 09/30/2011

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Laura, that's the Easy Walk harness which is made by Premier (same company that makes the Gentle Leader). I've found that dogs respond to the Easy Walk harness better and it's easier to wean them off of than the Gentle Leader.

For dogs that pull a Houdini (like Greyhounds can) a martingale collar (or a Greyhound collar if you prefer) works great. They also tend to come is really pretty patterns:
http://www.2houndsdesign.com/

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 09/30/2011

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None of my dogs have tugged hard enough to go the collar. My parents and my brother take their dogs to a very small vet where there is usually no other dogs in when they go.

I did have an aunt who had to use a harness on her cocker because when the dog pulled on his leash he threw up.

Vegemite - posted on 09/30/2011

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Meggy the reason I don't use a regular collar for walks is the dogs can very easily slip them off while on a lead even if it's done up tight. At work if a dog comes in with a regular collar we will put a check lead on. It's a soft material lead that has a ring at the end to feed the lead back trough making a loop. This is because we've had a lot of dogs in the past slip out of their collar. In a stressful environment and a tiny waiting room it's very easy for a fight to break out even with the calmest well behaved dogs. Also it's nicer for the dogs to have a loose lead around their neck for a walk and only tightened for correction

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 09/30/2011

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You all will think I'm strange. When I see everyone talking about harnesses and martingales I keep thinking about horses. Because when a horse has trouble not obeying commands with a harness, bridle and bit (or hackamore sometimes called a bitless bridle) they will add a martingale. A running martingale works best if you do jumping btw.

Thankfully I've never had to use anything but a regular collar on any dog I've walked. For some reason my BIL uses a choke on his dog (I'd love to choke him with it sometimes because he hardly pays attention to his dog) There's really no need for that type of collar on her because she's an older dog and pretty laid back except in the back yard.

Vegemite - posted on 09/30/2011

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Yeah I'm not a fan of "choke" or check chains as we call them here because most people don't know how to use them properly or will leave them on after walks. I've just swapped my corgi over to the half check from always using a check chain as the noise of the metal is the only thing that will grab his attention with out me having use words or make noises all the time. I never have to pull it tight, just give a jolt on the lead so it makes that sound or it will naturally make noise and correct himself when he goes for... "that bird over there or the flower, smelly bit of grass, oh look another dog, gust of wind, some imagined thing, oh wow what's that or this over here". I'm sure that's what's going through is head over again for the entire walk. He's a smart dog but has a complete lack of attention span. Arrrgg he's worse than a 2yr old.

Kate CP - posted on 09/30/2011

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For training purposes the collars I absolutely HATE are quick-release collars, choke chains, figure 8 harnesses, and slip-leads. I *love* flat buckle collars, five point harnesses, martingale collars, and the Easy Walk harness.

I will occasionally use a prong (or pinch) collar, a Gentle Leader, or a special combo of Gentle Leader and harness for dogs who have problems with pulling on the lead.

As you all know I'm actually a positive reinforcement trainer. I don't like using punishment to train at all. But when I'm having problems with a dog pulling on the lead I don't like the Gentle Leader that much...I prefer a prong collar. Why? When properly fitted and used as a gentle deterrent (NEVER "pop" the collar!) it works beautifully, doesn't hurt the dog, and is comfortable to wear and easy to wean them off of. The Gentle Leader, however, can be very hard for the average Joe to put on and use, most dogs HATE the way it feels and spend more time clawing it off their face than they do actually walking, and it can be harder to wean them off of it eventually.

All training aids are meant to be just that: an aid. Too many people use prong collars and Gentle Leaders as a crutch. Drives me batty. :P

~♥Little Miss - posted on 09/30/2011

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For collars, I do like the "Maringale" the best, but still do not like collars around the neck.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 09/29/2011

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You should've seen my brother's dog when my older daughter was a baby. The two of them grew up together and that dog was always outside my door or laying near the crib.

Jane - posted on 09/29/2011

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Pits were bred to be dog aggressive but NOT aggressive at all to humans. They used to be used to help watch children and were known as "Nanny dogs."

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 09/29/2011

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Marina true. He was usually just outside with my dad's dog and we brought him in when he scratched at the door. We actually didn't have to tether my brother's dog until he figured out he could jump the fence. We found that out when my dad's dog wanted to come in and my brother's dog was in our neighbour's yard.

I abhore dog fighting. That's part of the reason people think pit bulls are violent agressive dogs. My brother's dog is part pit and he's one of the most loving dogs I've known. I've met a few pure bred pits who just sniff you and then plop down on the couch.

Sherri - posted on 09/29/2011

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@Marina she is 8yrs old now they have learned she just can't be walked now has an invisible fence for her. She is a great dog she just is plain horrible on a leash.

Jane - posted on 09/29/2011

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I am involved in dog rescue and I have seen many embedded collars. One of my own dogs had an embedded collar when he came to me and still has scars. Another dog I met had bits of rusted chain links sticking out of the skin of his neck. We had to have them removed surgically. Several of the dogs had been used as bait dogs and all I have met have been bone skinny.



Because so many of my dogs have scar tissue on their necks I prefer to use harnesses when I can. I have had to train a lot of dogs not to pull, whether on collar or harness, and it is quite possible to do that, especially when you are dealing with people-loving breeds like the various bull dogs that I live with. There is a leash law in our town so anytime we go for walks I use leashes. I have also taught my dogs to sit and stay seated when someone comes towards us so the dog is less frightening and so he/she is calm, in case the person wants to meet him.



None of the dogs that live with me, either my own dogs or my foster dogs, have ever been chained while in my care. In fact. any time one of my guys sees a chain or hears it jingling he growls, letting me know that he doesn't like being chained one bit.



I check all harnesses and collars every day as part of daily petting. Since I have bulldogs who tend to ignore pain this is very important. The dogs just figure I am loving on them but I am looking for sores, hot spots, lumps, and just anything out of the ordinary. Although the dogs go out two or three times a day in the yard they much prefer to be in the same room with me (and with my husband when he was alive), preferably close enough to put a foot on one of mine.



Yes, I invest a lot of time in my dogs, but they deserve it and they enjoy it. In return, I enjoy them.



Edited to add: I tried the gentle leader on my very energetic pit-lab mix rescue, and he hated it so much that he managed to get it off and eat it. He has since learned that pulling means we stop and no one gets to go forward.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 09/29/2011

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Damn...sounds like she needs some professional training for the dog.

Sherri - posted on 09/29/2011

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Oh no she did she has a lab that chokes herself to almost passing out in a collar and pulls so hard on her harness it created bleeding sores from rubbing herself completely raw and not caring. She tried the gentle leader too Dutchess hated it so much she ripped it off her face and they got a second one and she managed to bite it off.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 09/29/2011

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Never heard of that. I would prefer a sore though, and have to find a new harness that fits better, than deal with the potential neck damage that can occur with a collar. She probably just didn't have the right harness for her dog. When they fit properly, they don't pull nearly as much. She should look into a gentle leader if she is having that much trouble...and a harness that fits better? Just a suggestion.



Edited to add stuff.

Sherri - posted on 09/29/2011

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Be careful harnesses can leave huge sores on them too, depending on how much they pull. My friends dog doesn't feel much pain and pulled so much on a harness rubbed her self completely raw.

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