Maternity Leave Benefits Around the World.

Samantha - posted on 01/05/2012 ( 66 moms have responded )

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I think these videos need to be aired again.









"In America, the Family Medical Leave Act guarantees most women 12 weeks of unpaid leave. According to recent census numbers (summarized by a Slate article entitled “Is 40 Weeks the Ideal Maternity Leave Length?“), many American mothers don’t – or can’t – take advantage of the 12 weeks off and return to the workforce quickly. More than 25% are back within 8 weeks. And 10% go back after only four weeks or less.



Such short maternity leaves impact mothers; many studies have tied short leaves to depression. But perhaps the bigger issue is how miniature leaves effect the babies, causing developmental delays and sickness.



Longer leaves can even save babies’ lives, according to Slate:



Two studies, one published in the Economic Journal in 2005 and another five years earlier,examined the results of the steady climb in paid leave in 16 European countries, starting in 1969. By charting death rates against those historical changes, while controlling for health care spending, health insurance, and wealth, the authors were able to attribute a 20 percent dip in infant deaths to a 10-week extension in paid leave. The biggest drop was in deaths of babies between 2 and 12 months, but deaths between 1 and 5 years also went down as paid leave went up. So what was the optimal amount of time off, according to all this research? According to Christopher Ruhm, the author of the first European study, paid leave of about 40 weeks saved the most lives.



Studies in Europe countries – which offer significantly more generous paid maternity and paternity leave packages – show that longer leaves actually decreased the odds that the babies would become high school drop-outs. Military draft data in Norway illustrates that longer leaves are also tied to increased male IQ and – interestingly enough – height.



How can these issues possibly be connected to maternity leave? Well, studies in America have shown that moms with shorter leaves are less likely exclusively breastfeed (breastfeeding has been shown to reduce the risk of illness such as bacterial meningitis and respiratory infections) and schedule their child for doctor’s appointments and immunizations.."



blogs.babble.com/being-pregnant/2011/12/22/1-out-of-10-usa-moms-back-to-work-after-four-weeks/

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Jodi - posted on 02/01/2012

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I still can't believe you people have to pay that much money to have a baby. That's just disgusting.

Jodi - posted on 02/01/2012

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I was simply trying to make the point, that for SOME people, 12 weeks without work would LITERALLY throw them in the poor house. Not people like you guys who *managed to scrape by*. There are people out there who are in that situation. I understand you did it tough, heck who didn't? BUT, there are those who genuinely would NOT be able to get by if they took a full 12 weeks off work. I am not talking about skipping the odd bill. I am talking about not being able to pay the rent for 3 months and being evicted and out on the street. I am talking not being able to pay for the heating for 3 months and having no heating in the house for the newborn baby, I am talking about having water cut off, those ESSENTIAL things.

Jodi - posted on 02/01/2012

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But some people don't have the choice. It's all good and fine to say you would suffer financially, but evidently, you can AFFORD to suffer financially if that is the stance you take. Others, when they say they will suffer financially, the literally mean they don't have the money to keep the roof over their heads or food in their mouths.

Krista - posted on 01/08/2012

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Man...that just seems so sad, though. I'm not anti-daycare, as you all know (my son's been in daycare since 8 months old). But I can't help but think that in those early newborn days, when a baby is still nothing but pure, animal need, it HAS to affect bonding with the mother, to spend that much time away from her.

My stepdad worked with a woman who had her baby on a Friday and was back at her desk on Monday. And there was no need for it -- she could have gotten maternity leave.

I just don't understand it...whether it's a baby human or a baby dog or a baby ANYTHING...it CANNOT be good for the baby to be away from its mother for long periods of its waking hours when it's only days old! It just seems really unnatural.

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MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 02/14/2012

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Here in Canada you get 12 months Mat Leave or Parental Leave. You can take portions and your husband take portions, you just cannot go over 12 months. However, most businesses do NOT pay for your leave. Some do but most that do are Government and they only pay up to 95% of your wage for the first 3 months and then you are on your own for the remaining 9 months.



I took a full year off, my employer hired someone in my place for that duration, I did not receive any mat leave pay. It was all E.I, which is only 55% of your regular pay but not to exceed $440 (approx)/week. So, I actually received about 40% of my regular pay. I took a bunch of RRSP's out to increase my monies to where they would've been if I were still working. If you need to withdraw RRSP the best time is when you have little or no income. ;)



Might I add, that if I hadn't had RRSP's I would not have been able to take ANY time off, except the 3 weeks vacation I saved... There is nothing wrong with those that had a beautiful baby and had to go directly back to work. Nothing at all! What are they suppose to do? Never have children? Gracious, we all do what we have to do, end of story...



Oh and 20+ years ago in Canada it was ONLY 6 weeks mat leave. We all grew up fine.. Just saying...

Jodi - posted on 02/02/2012

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"If you take 4-6 weeks and miss 1-2 payments on anything besides rent or mortgage you would be okay. So really unless you were a single mom who didnt qualify for assistance you do have a choice."



Firstly, we are talking about 12 weeks....the people who cannot afford to take TWELVE weeks off work, not 4-6 weeks. I believe the criticism was directed at women who go back to work earlier.



Secondly, someone may have a husband who is unemployed too, what choice would the mother have then?



And really, who the heck is ANYONE to judge why ANYONE else went back to work when their baby was 4 or 6 weeks. Fine, your situation told you not to, and that was what was right for YOUR family, but YOUR circumstances are unique to you, not to everyone else. Others have their unique situation that contributes towards their decisions, and quite simply, there are people out there who DON'T have a choice. The reason you can't understand other people's choices about this is because you are not in their shoes, and do not understand their circumstances or their decision making process because you were not in any way involved in it.



But when it comes right down to it, would it really matter why they made their choice? Would it matter to you that I was working again 5 days after having my first child, and back in the office by 6 weeks? You think I did that because there are things I couldn't give up? Not, I did that because my ex husband didn't earn enough, and he was actually off with a badly broken arm shortly after the birth of my son and couldn't work. We would have lost our HOME if I didn't work. But do those circumstances count? If you had been in that situation, would you still claim you'd never do it? You really couldn't say unless you were experiencing the exact circumstances.



And that is why I am saying, there is NOT always a choice. There really isn't.

Janice - posted on 02/02/2012

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@ Krista - I agree that makes a ton of sense. I wish it worked that way. Unfortunately, politician in the US have scared people into thinking that any social policies would equal loss of freedom grrr!



@ Suzie, I don't think you are a terrible mom. I really am trying to understand. I am from NY and they offer more services here than in other states. It does make sense that if you have a good paying job that you wouldn't be able to get help for just maternity. I'm assuming you didn't have insurance when you gave birth. That sucks! But I would have called the hospital and said I couldn't pay for x amount of months and worried about it later. My co-pay was only 500$ but that's what I did. My DD was born in Oct. and the hospital didn't get paid till March with my tax return.

However, I must assume that if you work at a gas station you should make little enough to get help. And if I had a job like that I would just quit, get government help for a month or 2 and then find another job.



In my area daycare for infants is average 220$, home daycare maybe 25-30 less and a nanny would be more. So unless you have a family member or friend who will do it for cheap or free it doesnt make sense to go back to a 9$ an hour job to have your entire check go to the person with your baby.



@ Jodi, in general you must skip 2 bills before anything is shut off or taken away. If you take 4-6 weeks and miss 1-2 payments on anything besides rent or mortgage you would be okay. So really unless you were a single mom who didnt qualify for assistance you do have a choice.



Of course it is absolutely ridiculous that family's have to choose between going in to debt or leaving their newborn in someone elses care. It is just terrible! I just have really hard time understanding why people make the choice they do. I get it why Suzie made the choice she did. However, I know women who chose keeping their newly leased car and cellphone over staying home with their child so I am a skeptic. Sorry.

Krista - posted on 02/02/2012

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Suzie, seriously. What is with you thinking that people are calling you evil or bad? NOBODY is calling you evil for having had to go back to work! Nobody.



I just don't understand why you keep persisting in seeing insults where none are actually given...

Suzie - posted on 02/01/2012

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.janice



well im a bad Mom i made the decision i had to to feed both of my children you cant get foodstamps or other help for maturnity leave so I had to go back to work and we still almost lost our home to forcloser. if it was a matter of not putting a roof over my childrens head then i would of stayed home longer . also 10,000.00 dollars in med bills for having my wounderful son and a mogage payments. its comon here in my area the girl that works at the gass station in our town only had 5 days after her c section and had to return to work. So yes I am evile i left my newborn with a wounderful woman and he is no worse for wear and quite the mamas boy to boot

Krista - posted on 02/01/2012

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@Janice: No, I know that's how your system works NOW. What I'm asking is why it couldn't be re-vamped so that you could draw unemployment while on mat leave. That's how it works here, and to be honest, it works extremely well.

Janice - posted on 02/01/2012

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Krista you can only claim unemployment if you are actually unemployed. If you intend to return to your job after maternity then you are still considered employed. And you cant claim unemployment if you quit because that's your choice. Really you can only get unemployment if you are laid off.

Krista - posted on 02/01/2012

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That's so sad that you had to resort to that, though! There's just no reason for it, really.



In the U.S., don't you guys have unemployment insurance premiums that come from your employer's payroll taxes? You should be allowed to claim unemployment after childbirth, for a period of time. Here it's a year, but if you guys even got 6 months, I think it would make SUCH a huge difference!

Janice - posted on 02/01/2012

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Sherri, I'm just curious/ nosy - how will you take maternity leave since you run a home daycare? People always ask why I dont run one or if I ever would and I always say no because - I dont know how those who do it ever get time off!

Janice - posted on 02/01/2012

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Jodi, my family can afford (just barely) for me not to work. However, I'm saying that if I had to, I would get food stamps and welfare before I would put my newborn in someone else's care. I would skip a gas/electric payment and or not pay my phone bill for 1 month so I could at least have 4 weeks with my baby.

Janice - posted on 02/01/2012

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I'm not judging because every situation is different but I just dont understand how a woman can leave her baby at 2 weeks. I dont care if I had to skip paying bills for a month or 2 there is just no way I would ever leave my newborn.

I was lucky by US standards. I got NYS disability for 8 weeks (120$ a week)) and my employer offered Aflac insurance so I had purposefully took out/ paid into a policy so that I received another 120$ a week for 12 weeks. But in the end I only returned to work part time for 4 weeks and then we just have been scraping by on one income.



Anyways I just dont get how anyone wouldn't find a way to scrape by for at least 4 weeks. I'm sorry if this sounds judgemental, enlighten me :)

Suzie - posted on 02/01/2012

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its also up to the state in which you live what the policy is and for the record Ethan is over a year old and had 1 ounce of formula when i was in the hospital and my dauther nursed to 22 months

Suzie - posted on 02/01/2012

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Laura i never thought i would agree with you but i do



all i had was 2 weeks and with out any pay some of us have no choice i have been with a small company for years andstill had no benifits. My friend in AZ has no maternity leave because her husband is army and they have been there less than a year however the state mandates that babys cant start daycare till there 6 weeks old so she will be off for six weeks and has no benifits in that time and no pay so they will be a strugle for them to make ends meat

Merry - posted on 02/01/2012

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Sherriim sure it varies greatly due to who you talk to. Most of the women I know did not have the option to take 12 weeks. Really, only women with established careers can take 12 weeks. All the rest of the population who works fast food or retail etc is only able to take 6 weeks unless theyve been at their job a long time and it's a big enough bussiness to let them qualify for 12 weeks.

I wasn't even allowed the 6 weeks!

But my boss was nice and promised me my job back anyways.

So some women don't even get ANY time legally protected of leave.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 02/01/2012

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I was told I couldn't drive for 2 weeks because if I got into an accident before then I might get injured and not be able to have any more kids. No idea how much truth there was to it, but not being able to drive or lift means I can't do my job.



Maybe I'm a special case :D Because of my ADD I get antsy and distracted easily and I need a change of scenery. I will say that because my line of work is flexible I'm always able to schedule dr appointments for myself or my children and get my shifts re-arranged or get a day off all together.



But I do understand what Krista is saying. Heck back in the 80's when my parents were adopting me my mom was required to take time off. And some moms do feel guilty about leaving their babies with someone they don't know very well or in a large daycare. The woman I left my baby with had also watched my older daughter, lived 3 houses down from my parents and had seen my baby a few times when I was out walking her. So I got really lucky in that area too.

Krista - posted on 01/31/2012

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That's the thing, though. Some women are ready to go back after 6 weeks. Or 6 days. And nobody is stopping them from doing so. They have every right to cut their mat leave short.



But there are other mothers who are nowhere near ready to return to work that early. Maybe they had a difficult birth and are still recovering. Maybe their baby has special health needs. Or maybe it just breaks their heart to think of leaving a tiny 6-week old infant in daycare.



So it's incredibly nice to have that choice -- the choice to do what is right for our own families.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 01/31/2012

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I took 8 and went stir crazy and statred thanking God for satellite TV and DVR. I think some American women only take that much leave because they don't want to go stir crazy

Janice - posted on 01/31/2012

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Sherri, I used to believe that most women did take the 12 weeks too. But my time reading posts here on COM has led me to believe otherwise. I'm going to search for statistics when I have time later.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 01/31/2012

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I could've gone for 12 when I lived in New York because maternity leave there is covered under disability leave- some states don't even do that. I did 6 weeks because I had also had 2 weeks prior to my daughter's birth of bed rest and I was getting antsy. So actually I did 8 weeks. I also didn't have to worry about losing my job (I moved 2 months after going back to work) because I'm a care aide and a good one at that.



Here in Canada our maternity leave is broken up into two parts. 15 weeks for the mom then another 35 to be split between the parents. You can also ask for it to be extended for another 6 months with no worry for your loss of job security.

Pam - posted on 01/30/2012

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awww, 12 weeks only? I get mat leave for 1 year here in Canada, full benefits because I worked wilts pregnant, plus child tax. SO its like they pay us to stay home with our babies and breastfeed them. free DR apts, and well, we are so very lucky.

Jennifer - posted on 01/15/2012

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I live in Canada and we are given up to 12 months maternity leave...I could not imagine going back to work at 8-12 weeks postpartum! I breastfed my children and could not have imagined quitting before they were ready (rather than my work schedule telling me to quit!) I feel sorry for those people who have to go back early and hope that they bond well with their children!

Brenda - posted on 01/11/2012

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In Canada we have 15 weeks of paid maternity leave providing you paid into and worked 600 hours in the last 52 weeks. On top of that we have 35 weeks of paid Parental leave for either parent (not both, although you can share and divide the total of the 35 weeks) to stay home, again following the 600 hours of work in the last 52 weeks. I could not even imagine not having this available to me after having a child. 12 weeks is not enough time, and unpaid at that! Wow, I'm very disappointed in the US.

Sylvia - posted on 01/09/2012

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Janice, I could never pump either. When DD was ~5 months I went back to my choir, which meant being gone for a few hours on Monday nights, and I used to try to pump some milk for DH to feed her ... with a syringe (!), because she wouldn't take a bottle and refused to drink milk from a sippy cup (water was acceptable, but not milk. Who knows?). I would pump on and off all day, including simultaneously nursing and pumping, just to get 3 oz ... and then DH would be all excited when I got home if he'd managed to feed her 1 oz, and DD would be like, BOOBIE BOOBIE BOOBIE WHERE IZ MY BOOBIE. I was reeeaaallly happy not to be working F/T and pumping, let me tell you.

Janice - posted on 01/09/2012

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IDK if I could find a nanny job with 2 kids in tow but maybe.



Back to the OP though ;)

I was just thinking that truly the American maternity leave system is based on arbitrary mother recovery time and have zero to do with babies at all because the length of time paid is linked to type of delivery. If you deliver vaginally you can get 6 weeks paid (I think its 55%) or if you deliver via c-section you get 8 weeks. This is based on the idea that a c-section takes longer to recover from.



I now know from experience that a vaginal birth can be a harder recovery and in general recovery time is different for every woman. Obviously maternity leave in other countries is based on the needs of babies not just some random time doctors think is sufficient for recovery.



ETA: I looked up the pay. Only a handful of states offer any pay which is covered by disability insurance. In NY you can get 50% of your pay up to 170$ which is crap!

Merry - posted on 01/09/2012

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Maybe a babysitting job? I did decently with a regular nanny type job where I brought my son along.......?

Janice - posted on 01/09/2012

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I am pumping some now but like you said pumping sucks! I despise it. I usually only pump 1x per day. Considering I cant afford daycare, I am just praying to find an overnight job and that I will be lucky and Gavin will start sleeping through or only needing 1 bottle. Of course that means zero sleep for me :(

Merry - posted on 01/09/2012

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Janis are you pumping now to save up milk for when you return to work? It keeps in the freezer for about 6 months so you can be saving now!

Janice - posted on 01/09/2012

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Pumping definitely does suck! and some women, like myself, are not productive pumpers. I cant pump enough to leave my baby for 9 hours even if I wanted to.
With my daughter I left my job to finish my degree and I made my class schedule so I wasn't gone for more than 2.5 hours.
With my son I wont have the luxury of staying home as long. I need to find a job by the end of April in order to start paying back loans. I will probably have to supplement with formula unless my body decides to start responding to pumping. He will be almost 6 months then.
He will be 6 weeks on Thursday and I just absolutely cant imagine leaving him and being back to working a week from now. I'm so glad I'm lucky enough not too. It is an extreme financial burden but worth it.

Merry - posted on 01/09/2012

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That's cuz pumping sucks! Most every mom I've talked to hates pumping! But I do know one mom who exclusively pumped for her boy for 16 months! She's a champ in my eyes.

Becky - posted on 01/09/2012

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I have several friends in the US who weaned before they had planned to because they had to go back to work and pumping just became too much for them. One of them had another baby a year ago and was able to be a SAHM with this one, and is now still breastfeeding him at a year and has no plans of stopping soon. So I'd say it definitely makes a difference!

Merry - posted on 01/09/2012

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Many women have the attitude or decision that they will breastfeed until it becomes too much to handle. So, if they're home they figure hey it's cheaper so I should nurse. But then any big bump in the road will make them stop. So if they have to go back to work they might say they'll pump but if the boss won't give them a good pumping spot, or if the baby then refuses the breast, or if they get mastitis due to not pumping often enough, etc. then theyre done!

The moms who are bound and determined to breastfeed might make it work but for many women breastfeeding is just a cheap way to get free milk for their baby for a time.

I returned to work at 6 weeks after Eric, thankfully it was short three hour shifts only 4-5 days a week so Eric stayed with dad and I pumped one bottle before I left and it was all easy and simple.

But had I needed to go to work two weeks after his birth full time at a fast food place where I could only pump in the bathroom or car and it was winter and the car was cold and the bathroom was gross nd I only got one break and I kept getting clogs and they got infected and my baby started preferring bottles anyways or o got post pardum depression......yeah I'd be done nursing!

Janice - posted on 01/09/2012

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100% agree with you Krista!

Sherri, I was saying before 6 weeks and you said the youngest you took was 8 weeks. I'm sure you are right it may be a family member who is home anyways. However, I dont care how clean your daycare is - home or center- a baby will be exposed to more germs in a group setting than if they were cared for at home. Plus if you are going back to work so quickly you are less likely to breastfeed plus the child has not had all of their vaccinations yet. So although it may not be the norm for infants to become seriously ill the chances are higher in group care.

Becky - posted on 01/08/2012

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My husband's boss is like that too, Krista. Apparently after her baby was born, she was back at work a day or 2 later! I guess her husband took the parental leave, so at least the baby was with daddy, but I still think that's sad! I couldn't handle being away from my babies when they were that tiny.

Becky - posted on 01/08/2012

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Good lord, at 2 weeks post partum with my first, I could still barely walk! I would've died if I'd had to go back to work! That can't be good for a mother's recovery!

Janice - posted on 01/08/2012

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So what i want to know is who is taking care of these tiny babies when mothers go back to work before six weeks? I know where I live daycares do not take babies under six weeks.

Janice - posted on 01/08/2012

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LOVE the video! Especially after watching a women blush and fidgit after saying breastfeeding in front of her grandson while being interview for the target nurse-in.

Krista - posted on 01/08/2012

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Oh, and I just watched that Sesame Street video, and it really makes me think that in some ways, since the 1970's, we've gone backwards. If they tried to show that on Sesame Street today, especially using the word "breast", I bet you'd get a LOT of parents complaining about it being "inappropriate." Sigh.

Krista - posted on 01/08/2012

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Gad, I can't IMAGINE going back after two weeks! After two weeks I had leaking breasts, a healing episiotomy suture, hemorrhoids-a-go-go, and my hormonal levels could be best represented by a Jackson Pollock painting.

To sit at a desk all day and actually be coherent? And to think of my two-week old newborn without me?

I would have lost my mind.

I feel really bad that you had to make that choice, Suzie.

Sylvia - posted on 01/08/2012

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Depressing, but not surprising. I remember the first 12 weeks of DD's life ... vaguely. There was no way either of us was ready for me to go back to work when she was 6 weeks old. We were just getting the hang of things then. And I really can't imagine being at all functional at work with such a young baby at home. And I doubt the daycare would have thanked me for handing over a baby who wouldn't take a bottle, wouldn't take a pacifier, couldn't sleep except in arms, and spent several hours a day shrieking because she was in pain (she was born with bilateral inguinal hernias; after she had surgery at 5 months things were much better, although she was and is a high-need, high-touch kid). No wonder American mums are so obsessed with getting babies to take bottles and to sleep through the night unnaturally early :(

Of course longer maternity leaves have to be phased in. Other developed countries have done this over many years -- 20 years ago my boss had 12 weeks of mat leave, 12 years ago my co-workers had 35 weeks, 9 years ago I had 50 weeks. But surely it's time to at least start *thinking* about it. It should be obvious by now that not only is longer leave feasible, it has a lot of benefits for the whole society.

As a manager, I can tell you that it's MUCH easier to hire someone to cover a 12-month maternity leave than it is to get a temp in to cover a few weeks' leave. Also, I'm not sure how it works in other countries but in Canada, maternity pay is treated as an Employment Insurance benefit: you pay into EI through payroll deductions, and then you apply for maternity and parental benefits (dads can take parental leave too). Employers can "top up" your EI benefits to a higher percentage of your salary (EI is 55% of your salary up to a certain ceiling), but they don't have to. So the employer isn't paying two salaries; at most, they might be paying, say, one and a quarter or one and a third. Nobody is *required* to top up maternity pay, so the burden on small businesses is not what you might imagine. Freelancers and other self-employed people get a raw deal of course ... no system is perfect.

Suzie, it's great that you made it work, but you know what? A lot more people would be able to make it work if the system wasn't so heavily stacked against them. And wouldn't it have been nice to have another choice besides (a) go back to work after 2 weeks or (b) not be able to pay the bills?

Janice - posted on 01/07/2012

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Suzie of course commitment plays a role and of course if you are very committed then you will try harder to make it work. However, to say returning to work quickly doesnt make breastfeeding more difficult is crazy. I think it is awesome that you made it work but many woman cannot.

Suzie - posted on 01/07/2012

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Wow this is wrong on so many leavels its the mothers comentment to make breastfeeding work that is an issue not short maturnity leaves. It also in most areas in the US Not hard to schedual those imunization. How can i say this I had to return to work just 2 weeks after my son was born I had no choice because we had bills we had to pay. My son is a healthy child and was exclusivley breast Feed and at 15 month is still a nursing little man that only had one set of shots delayed and that was due to a cold at a year old and Yes it was one of his first illnesses. that being said it dose sadden me that we have to be forced back to work so soon as our government pays for people to live on welfair but can not help familys through the birth of there child.

Janice - posted on 01/07/2012

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I worked in a daycare for six years and I completely agree that going back to work early can affect breastfeeding. Additionally, being in a group care setting automatically sets a child up for being introduced to more illnesses.

And I know from talking with the parents at the daycare along with parents in my own circle of family and friends that most employers do not offer a ton of time off to take care of your sick child.



So with breastfeeding the first few weeks are very difficult. If you go back to work before this is well established and is becoming easier than you are not likely to continue. Plus you must coordinate pumping with your employer which is not easy for most. Then you can factor in that many women can not pump successfully. I had zero issues feeding my DD to plumpness but got almost nothing when I pumped. If I went back to work at 12 weeks there is no way I could have continued breastfeeding with out supplementing formula. My discussion with other moms has led me to believe this is a very common road block in breastfeeding.



As for increased illness exposure - Of course in a daycare you do all you can to avoid spreading germs but its not easy!

Example: While the teacher changes a diaper a child with a runny nose puts a toy in their mouth then drops the toy and now another child picks it up and puts it in their mouth. This is the everyday reality of daycare.

Now mom gets a call her child is sick - this is the fourth time 2 months her employer is annoyed that she has to constantly leave and then is out the next 2 days. So instead of keeping her sick kid home she gives them tylenol to mask the fever and sends them to daycare and now more children are infected. Of course young babies are more suseptable (sp) to illness complications.



Please tell me how short maternity could NOT be linked to increased infant illness and mortality!

Jodi - posted on 01/06/2012

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I realise it is your opinion, and that's fine. I wasn't always supportive of paid maternity leave either. But I understand the benefits now, to the entire economy, and fully support it.

Jodi - posted on 01/06/2012

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Oh, I agree it would need to be done slowly. Business concerns is one of the biggest reasons our government is paying the maternity leave in Australia. I am sure, however, that eventually, costs of it WILL go back on business over time. But to do that in one hit would kill small business. You can't make ANY major industrial relations changes without impacting the economy.

However, having a goal to strive towards is a start.

There IS actually a benefit to business in paid maternity leave. They will have a higher retention rate of their female workers, amongst other things.

http://www.eowa.gov.au/Developing_a_Work...

Jodi - posted on 01/06/2012

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So are you saying, Sherri, that you can't see any merit in changing the archaic maternity leave laws in the US? That they are perfectly satisfactory?

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