Obese But Healthy????

♏*PHOENIX*♏ - posted on 10/03/2010 ( 16 moms have responded )

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Do you think its possible to be overweight or fat and be healthy...???

Is it possible to be fat and fit? Perhaps, researchers say, but losing weight may make you even better off.

A new study, published in the September issue of the journal Diabetes Care, finds that people who are obese but metabolically healthy (meaning they have healthy cholesterol and blood sugar levels as well as normal blood pressure), can still improve their health profile by dropping a few pounds.

The study contradicts an earlier finding that people who are obese and yet healthy may actually be worse off if they lose weight. What the new study can't do is explain why some people manage to be both obese and healthy - or whether there's really such a thing.

"Right now, we are in a gray zone. Is it really protective to be metabolically healthy?" said Martin Brochu, an obesity researcher at the Universite de Sherbrooke in Quebec. "There's a huge debate in the scientific literature right now."

Obese, but healthy

Researchers have long known that excess weight doesn't affect everyone the same way. Obesity is defined as having a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or over, a measure that includes height and weight but not other related measures like the ratio of muscle mass to fat. At the population-wide level, BMIs over 30 are associated with numerous health problems, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes. But the measurement is less sensitive when it comes to predicting individual health.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/livescience/2010...

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Jodi - posted on 10/04/2010

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It is not uncommon for sports people to be classified "obese" when you calculate their BMI, when in actual fat, their weight is muscle mass, which weighs more than fat. So of course you can be "overweight" and still healthy.



Many indicators are now also using waist measurement to assess how healthy you are, because it is the fat around your middle which is the most dangerous, as it generally indicates fatty tissue around the heart, and other major organs. So if your BMI is a little high, but your waist measurement is within range, as a general indicator, you are not really obese.



BMI is one of many tools which should be used to assess general health, certainly not the only one.

Dana - posted on 10/05/2010

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An oxymoron if I ever heard one...no you can't be obese and still be healthy. So you pass some tests and are not at a high risk for Cardiovascular disease. . Big whoop. You still have all those fat pockets crowding all your internal organs and straining them. Not to mention that you can't do any exercise in that condition.

I think it's bs and the last thing that people need to hear when they are looking for any excuse for being obese.

Petra - posted on 10/05/2010

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Yeah, your typical body builder these days (I've known a few in my time, lol) has a very strict diet with little to no carbs, a lot of artificial supplements (creatine, high fat weight gain), and they go through harsh cycles of dehydration to cut weight for shows/photos, etc. The guys who body build to meet chicks at the gym are pretty healthy, but the pros or the wannabes, not so much.

And Emma - I tend to agree with you on the health/obese issue - being a little chubby or soft is one thing, but obesity is a serious excess of body fat. Its hard to imagine how someone who has been classified as obese can also fit into the healthy category.

LaCi - posted on 10/05/2010

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Actually, if bodybuilding properly, one follows an extremely healthy diet, works out with both cardio and weight training, and puts on weight slowly.

Increasing strength of muscles decreases strain on joints and bones. Weight causes problems for joints when there is too much weight for the skeletal and muscular system to handle. Increasing muscle strength and mass (in the appropriate way) decreases your risk for joint and bone injuries, as well as arthritis.

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Tracy - posted on 10/05/2010

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I think its different for each person. I have been thinner than now but I have never been able to run 10km in my life. I recently accomplished this :)
My BMI is about 29 and I feel the healthiest I have ever felt. I think its more important how active you are and to eat in moderation. Just because your skinny does not mean your are healthy. Just because your BMI is between18.5-24.9, this person could smoke two packets a day or eat very little but not healthy food and still be thin.

Stifler's - posted on 10/05/2010

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I didn't say they all did but often the strain of the weight of their muscles on their bones take its toll and they get premature arthritis etc. I was obese at 90kg and I'm 5'4 and I still don't feel "healthy" now at 75 even though I'm not considered obese anymore.

LaCi - posted on 10/05/2010

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I said less any drug usage, and no, you don't have to use steroids to build muscle. BMI is used for everyone, including bodybuilders, and plenty of thin people have far too much body fat. So no, the BMI is not an accurate indicator of health in itself.

Stifler's - posted on 10/05/2010

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The BMI only really refers to adults that are not body builders. Body builders aren't that healthy IMO and a lot use steroids, not very healthy.

Stifler's - posted on 10/05/2010

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No!! If people are healthy it means they are exercising for at least 20 minutes a day and eating healthy food. Is it really possible to be obese if you're doing that?

LaCi - posted on 10/05/2010

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Well technically a bodybuilder would have an obese or overweight BMI, but yes they're still healthy, less any freaky drug usage.

There are plenty of people who are "thin" but still have a high body fat percentage and the same risks as those who are obese/overweight. There are plenty of people who are overweight who are covered in fucktons of muscle. BMI doesn't take enough into account, is a tool to be used in conjunction with other measurements of health, like body fat percentage.

Sharon - posted on 10/04/2010

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yes. I'm not sure about obese, but I've known plenty of people who are rotund and can do more situps than I can, run farther and longer than I can, swim farther & faster than I can.

Being skinny or thin is no guarantee of health or fitness.

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Yes, it is POSSIBLE to be both by that standard but I agree with the article, that losing weight will make you even better off.

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I think that being obese and having normal levels of blood sugar and cholesterol can make you think you are healthy when in fact, you are putting more stress on your body than is healthy. You heart has to pump harder to get the blood flowing properly, the excess weight damage the articulations and the spine, pretty much all the organs have to work more than necessary to do the same job. blood tests may show that everything is "normal" but IMO, obesity is never healthy. It may not show now but it is only a question of time before the body has had enough and becomes ill.

Sara - posted on 10/04/2010

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I think that it depends. I think like other ladies have said, it depends on the size of your waist and your neck, and how much fat you have as opposed to muscle. But, IMO, if you have lead a sedentary lifestyle, whether your BMI is obese or not, and if you eat a lot of crap all the time, then no, you're not healthy.

Tah - posted on 10/04/2010

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It is funny the way you assess overweight and obese on a chart. People have taken to measuring you neck and other areas because of the way it is calculated. The answer to the question is yes. you can be both

Petra - posted on 10/04/2010

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I'm going to veer off the scientific track and use a personal example. My mother is morbidly obese and in her 60's. She has very healthy blood sugar and cholesterol levels and is, apparently, in no danger of developing adult onset diabetes and has had no respiratory, cardiovascular or circulatory issues whatsoever. She uses her state of health to defend her continued obesity - it is not affecting her health, therefore there is no need for her to lose weight. She eats pretty healthy food most of the time - its just that she eats four times the amount she needs to. Her annual doctor appointments always end up the same - everything is good, but you need to lose weight. She hears the good part and disregards the remainder of her doctor's advice.

It is possible to be obese and also healthy - but only for a matter of time. I am talking about extreme obesity, of course. For now, my mum is healthy, but somewhere along the line it is going to catch up with her. Her skeletal frame is supporting a huge, huge mass and she can not evade the strain this puts on every part of her body forever. Her doctor knows this, she knows this, my entire family knows this, but as long as she remains "healthy", she is going to continue to deny the need for her to lose weight.

Obese, but healthy is possible, though also something of an oxymoron - the two can't coexist forever.

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