Obesogens

Sara - posted on 12/22/2010 ( 13 moms have responded )

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http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/understan...


We blame weight gain on eating too many burgers and burning too little fat, but scientists are discovering that chemicals we’re exposed to everyday could be a big part of the obesity epidemic. Called obesogens, or endocrine disruptors, these natural and man-made chemicals work by altering the regulatory system that controls your weight—increasing the fat cells you have, decreasing the calories you burn, and even altering the way your body manages hunger.



What do you all think?

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Becky - posted on 12/23/2010

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There are a lot of factors besides poor diet and lack of exercise which can contribute to obesity. Stress, which causes an increase in cortisol, which causes an increase in belly fat. Lack of adequate sleep. Hormonal or thyroid problems, to name a few. Yes, people need to take responsbility for their diet and exercise levels, but it's not fair to paint everyone who struggles with weight with the same fat, lazy, poor diet slob brush either!

[deleted account]

It's possible that it's one factor that makes people more prone to gain weight, but it still goes back to the same thing, over eating and under exercise. There are studies showing all kinds of reasons for obesity, but how many people who eat mostly vegetables, only minimal fat/sugar and exercise at least 20 mins per day are obese? Probably Zero.

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I think genetics, personality, and lifestyle all play huge parts in a person's weight. I also think that a person who pays attention to what they put in their body and makes sure they keep active will have more success than someone who sits back telling themselves it's all in their DNA or in these somewhat unavoidable "obesogens" and that they can't help it. I'm not saying that as a fact, just as an opinion, based on personal experience.

*was just thinking, why do i feel like i have to put a disclaimer on something when it should be an unspoken rule of thumb? huh...anyway...*

~♥Little Miss - posted on 12/22/2010

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LOL...I am reading this while eating chinese takeout...

[deleted account]

Oooh, ooh....I'm totally interested but headed out the door so I'm posting this so I receive email notifications and can catch up later!

Thanks Sara -- I'll be back!

Stifler's - posted on 12/22/2010

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I think obesogens probably do affect us, but we also don't actually do that much exercise. We don't boil coppers and use mangles, or walk 10km to school barefoot anymore. 30 minutes a day of walking is recommended but all that is going to do is maintain your weight.

Tara - posted on 12/22/2010

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Look to the frogs!!
Years ago we had a lot of frogs on our farm that were born with too many toes, one eye, no eyes, genitalia on the external side of their bodies etc.
We contacted a University and they sent out a team of researchers and they took a lot of water and soil samples.
They told us that frogs are the proverbial canary in the coal mine when it comes to the human endocrine system.
Scary stuff.

Sara - posted on 12/22/2010

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I was breastfed for longer than 12 months and have struggled with weight my whole life.



While I do understand the points some of you have made, when you say things like "Rather than accepting responsibility and making changes to their life, they can say it is out of their control and have science to at least partially back up their claim" (not trying to pick on you Cassie!) it makes me think, would you say that about research for cancer to someone with lung cancer who smoked for 30 years? Or someone with skin cancer who sunbathed or never wore sunblock? I don't think researching these kinds of things make it easier for people to find excuses to remain the way they are. I think if they do prove that things like this have an impact on obesity or one day discover an obesity gene therapy, it would help a lot of people.

Tara - posted on 12/22/2010

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yep, it's also true that some the same chemical can also trigger precocious puberty seen around the world (more so in countries where certain pesticides etc. are still sprayed heavily)
I think genetics is the new frontier of medical science and I find all very interesting. I read somewhere that breastfeeding for a min. 12 months can "turn" off the obesity gene.
Hmmm.... going to look that up now.

Cassie - posted on 12/22/2010

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I think it is very interesting and possibly an additional factor that contributes to obesity. I have to agree that people, especially Americans, have adopted such a seditious lifestyle with so many comfort foods and over-processed foods that is the main contributor to our obesity epidemic. While I think it is important to research these contributing factors and make the public aware of them, I think they could be used as just another excuse for why the overweight are the way that they are. Rather than accepting responsibility and making changes to their life, they can say it is out of their control and have science to at least partially back up their claim....

Sara - posted on 12/22/2010

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Well, technically there are athletes that exercise everyday and are in the obese category of the BMI, but I see what you're saying. I do think, however, there is some merit to suggesting that preservatives and chemicals we come into contact with have changed the way our bodies process things.

Sara - posted on 12/22/2010

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Where you find them

The short answer: everywhere, particularly because high fructose corn syrup, which can be found in every kind of food, from sodas to yogurt to pretzels, is an obesogen. The ubiquitous, viscous sweet stuff makes your liver insulin resistant and tampers with leptin to increase your hunger, setting up a vicious cycle where you crave more food that is then more easily turned into fat.


Other common places to find obesogens:

•In your faucets: Pesticides seep deep into the soil and find their way to the water table and into your tap water. The main obesogen in tap water is atrazine. Banned in Europe, but found around the United States, atrazine slows thyroid hormone metabolism. Another culprit found in tap water, tributylin, a fungicide painted on the bottoms of boats, stimulates fat cell production.
•Cans and water bottles: Bisphenol-A (BPA), a synthetic estrogen used to make plastics hard which has been banned from baby bottles, but is still present in many other plastics (especially sports water bottles) and the lining of most cans, has been shown to increase insulin resistance in animal studies.
•Nonstick pans and microwave popcorn: Animal studies have shown that early exposure to a chemical used to make items non-stick – Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) – leads to obesity in later life. It also is known to affect thyroid glands, which are important regulators of hormones that control weight. Found mainly in products like Teflon pans, it’s also hidden in microwave popcorn bags and pizza boxes.
•Shower curtains and air fresheners: Phthalates, chemicals found in vinyl products such as shower curtains and fragrance products such as air fresheners, may lower testosterone and metabolism levels, causing you to gain weight and lose muscle mass. They’re also found in vinyl flooring and industrial-grade plastic wrap used to shrink wrap meat in the grocery store.

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