Opinions on ADD/ADHD diagnoses?

Bonnie - posted on 03/16/2011 ( 52 moms have responded )

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My 4.9yr old son has recently been diagnosed with ADHD. Personally I don't believe in it, period. There is reasonable evidence that suggests you cannot diagnose a child under 7yrs to have either ADD or ADHD, due to children all developing at different rates & having vastly different personalities as they are learning what is & is not acceptable (to society in general & to individual families/people). Not to mention the fact that my son doesn't actually fit the criteria to begin with.
While I can understand that, to someone who doesn't know me or my son very well, it does seem that he is "different" somehow (& I use the term "different" very loosely), it infuriates me to be told my son has something I know he does not.

Would you tell people, relevant to your child's life, that they have this "diagnoses"?
Do you believe in ADD/ADHD?
What is your definition of these "disorders"?

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Jenni - posted on 03/22/2011

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Well I can't speak for anyone else but for me, it taught me humility and to be much more cautious with my parenting choices. Do my full research, take into account personal experiences, read between the lines and ask more questions. So I guess I'm a living example of the positive effects a resource like COM can have on a parent. :)

Jenni - posted on 03/22/2011

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Yikes! That is just absurd. I think education is the key parents need when dealing with ANY medical issue. It's not enough to just trust a medical professional's word for it, sadly.

Jodi - posted on 03/22/2011

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I misread your post didn't I....forgive me, I've had a long night, LOL. Its almost 1am here and I am only just having my down time (and this is how I choose to spend it???? I need to be committed......)

Jodi - posted on 03/22/2011

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jennifer, I DO think there is a problem putting a name to a behavioural issue when it isn't the correct name, because THEN what is happening is that they are dealing with "ADHD", and not necessarily the underlying issues. Therefore, the behavioural treatment needs to be different. ADHD IS a chemical/biological disorder. When environmental factors come into the equation it needs to be dealt with differently. A situation where a child's behaviour is a result of issues with their family environment, that is NOT ADHD, and it should not be treated as such.

Linda - posted on 03/22/2011

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I agree 100% percent with you. Any time one of these doctors want to drug your children know that they have to inform you about the "INFORMED CONSENT" about these drugs. It is the law of coursethe majority of the time they never tell you because they think you may not know it, and that is mainly ture. Look uop the black box warnings that the FDA puts on these drugs that mainly cause depressions, and eventually turns into sucidial attempts. I basically feel that this stuff is motivated about the money these Dr's receive from the pharmecutical industries. Check out the CCHR website and contact them to receive a documenry "Makinf A Killing' Very informative about the Pharmecutical industries and the money these doctors get [not chump change] and the FDA. The motivations that are behind these harmful, killing drugs.

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Jeanine - posted on 03/23/2012

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I have had the same experience and it took a 15 minutes, $400 session for the man to come up with that ridiculous diagnosis.

Furthermore, the "doctor" proceeded to tell me that my son had a blank expression because he couldn't think straight. I wanted to punch him right there! When I disagreed with him that medication was not the only option for him, he told me that it was because I didn't know what I was talking about.

I agree that my son needs extra assistance because his mind races through a million things at a time (I have the same problem) but its bs that all doctors do these days is prescribe medication.

We'd lost all faith and hope but then was referred to Queenscliff Family and Child Health Centre in Sydney and they are amazing. They have taken our concerns and various observations into account before Councilling or recommending and we are definitely coping a lot better because of it.

Get a second opinion and remember that the council funded centers (although under resourced compared to paid for services) have less of a hidden agenda that some paid for services.

My 2 cents - I wish you luck and the world of strength.

Carlie - posted on 11/30/2011

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Hmm...Again, I am a 37 year old single mother with ADHD, recently diagnosed in December 2010. I take 8 Ritalin pills a day. Nothing to sneer at let me tell ya. I know that ADD/ADHD are controversial diagnoses, and I also understand why. However, my diagnosis was the best thing that ever happened to me. I responded a while back, to another member's post regarding ADD/ADHD.....and I don't know how your child feels....because, well...I'M NOT YOUR CHILD....!! :) But I live with the negative affects of ADHD everyday and have since I was about 7 years old (my doctor's suspicions).

The ONE thing I cannot fathom? When you tell someone, "Hey look, I'm sorry. I have ADHD...and sometimes I "forget" things." And THEY say, (laughing first) "Oh yeah, I'm a little ADHD too." Great. Well. It's NOT FUNNY. It's nothing to sneer about and it's DEFINATELY NOT FUNNY.

End of story.

Bonnie - posted on 03/30/2011

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Kati, yes my son has seen a psychologist. We were originally seeing a different psychologist because I wanted my son assessed to see where he was developmentally. We continued seeing her because, as a single parent with NO help, I needed to talk to someone about some of my son's behaviours & get some ideas of how to better manage/change them. She has since had a baby & is on maternity leave so she referred us to the current psychologist, who made this "diagnoses".
I never asked this psych to give a diagnoses because I'm 90% sure my son's unwanted behaviours are due to environment -moving a lot, family issues, etc - & inconsistency with rules/boundaries on my part.
My son is about to start at a childcare centre closer to home & I have decided NOT to tell them of this "diagnoses" because his behaviour has improved dramatically with the use of a communication book at his current centre. However, in looking for a new centre I did tell one that my son had recently been diagnosed ADHD. Their response was horrid. I was told my son would not be allowed to start there until a specialist worker was approved to "help out" with my son!
The new centre has just been told that we use a communication book because his behaviour is sometimes rather challenging. So far they've been very understanding & are willing to help & work with us. Although that may have something to do with the fact that they have a boy, in the room my son will be in, who I think has Down Syndrome.

Rosie - posted on 03/22/2011

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yes it's real, yes it's overdiagnosed apparantly (i've never seen it, but i hear it is). and NO i do not believe a 4 year old can be diagnosed with it. did your child see a psychologist? who told you he has ADHD, and why did you take him to get diagnosed if you know it can't be diagnosed until later? i'm confused.

Jenn - posted on 03/22/2011

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I agree - nobody wants to feel like they are doing something wrong and the natural reaction is to become defensive. And yes, we would HOPE that people would reassess their own situations, but I don't know that that is always the case, and even if they do finally realize their own faults, it may be too late - like when the child has already grown.

Jenni - posted on 03/22/2011

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Not to go too OT but when I was a newer mom I held the idea that some 'flawed' parenting practices I believed in were the right choice for my family. When I was called out on those choices on COM I was naturally defensive. Take for example my use of CIO with my first born. At the time I had researched methods by googling sleep techniques. Settling on CIO without taking into account other people's opinions or personal experiences with it. I was heavily influenced by a site advocating CIO. In retrospect, it was a piss poor decision and I didn't research nearly enough resources before deciding to use it.

When I defended my methods on COM. I of course was attacked by many anti-CIO moms. Or maybe I took it that way because no body wants to admit they've made a mistake with their child. It took awhile for the comments, opinions, suggestions to sink in but I eventually conseded and did even more research on the subject.



When I had my daughter I was no longer an advocate for CIO and used gentle, natural sleep techniques with my daughter.



Anyways, the point I'm trying to make is that even if these parents seem defensive at the time. MOST people will eventually take into consideration and reassess their original stance on those 'flawed methods'. At least I hope in most cases that's true! That we have the ability to re-evalute our parenting choices.

Jenn - posted on 03/22/2011

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Oh good god! I just made the mistake of clicking on a link on the right that was an older thread on the welcome page regarding ADD/ADHD and it just reaffirms my belief. I saw someone say that their child was diagnosed at 11 months! WTF?!? Another lady said that at age 2 her son couldn't even sit still for a half an hour to watch Blue's Clues - ummm.....isn't that normal bahaviour for a 2 year old?!? Or how about this one - a mother of 4, 2 with ADD, and the youngest one is just fine at daycare but not at home - gee lady, maybe that should tell you something - it's YOU! OK - I better stop before some of you give me a tongue lashing LOL!

Jenn - posted on 03/22/2011

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I also think of the doting parent, who enables the behaviour, rather than correcting it. I know in the past I've used the term "crappy parenting", and sometimes I think that is the case, but to be more specific, I think misguided parenting would be more accurate. Even think of things you've read on COM, where you are shocked at what a Mom is saying/doing, but she has nothing but the best of intentions and perhaps just doesn't know any better. So I wouldn't say that she is a "crappy parent", but most definitely misguided. And if you ever even hint to these parents that their own actions have caused these unwanted reactions in their kids - well look out! Now you're the bad guy for pointing out what is obvious to the rest of the world, because they take it as a personal attack, and instead of taking a step back and reassessing their situation, they get defensive and only work harder to maintain their current, flawed methods as a way of "showing us" that they are right and doing things like they should - even if that isn't the case.

Jenni - posted on 03/22/2011

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Haha Jenn, I knew I should have included that in my post. If the routes of hollistic approaches are showing little to no effect then there may indeed be an issue of a chemical or biological factor. IE: a mental illness... potentially in the case I have described and in the case of my brother. Careful monitoring by parents and a specialist would help determine if that is indeed the case over time and as the child ages.

And absolutely it doesn't necessarily mean the parent is a 'bad' parent. That must be a hard struggle for parents to feel like it's their fault even though they had the best of intentions. Sometimes tramatic events (IE: a divorce, death) are beyond our control, also I believe that one parenting style may work on one child but another child needs a completely different approach. Usually based on different personalities and the fullfiling the needs of those personalities.

Jenn - posted on 03/22/2011

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OK - so if ADD/ADHD is a chemical imbalance like bi-polar disorder etc., wouldn't it NEED medication? So in cases where medication is not needed, and changes are brought about by changing routines/parenting techniques etc., it wouldn't actually be ADD/ADHD. I personally feel like a lot of these "problems" that kids have come from the parenting style that is chosen. It doesn't necessarily make you a bad parent, or mean that you have an unhappy household. I see examples all the time of parents with good intentions, providing a happy house and lots of love and attention, yet the kids act out or misbehave constantly or show signs of "ADD", when really it's just the parenting style (or lack of parenting) that is the real problem. If/when the parents change their tune, the kids do too.

Jenni - posted on 03/22/2011

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I agree that the diagnosis largely coincides with environment in most cases. The scary thing about it is when we hear "ADD/ADHD/ODD" we automatically think medication. When a child receives a diagnosis behavioural disorder we should be thinking about finding the root of the problem if it is indeed environmental with the help of a behavioural specialist. Acknowledging those potential causes and developing a plan of action through holistic approaches. A combination of BHM, theorpy, family councelling, changing parenting styles or whatever else would be necessary.
As a mother pointed out in an earlier thread about ODD (her daughter received the diagnosis) she sure sounded like she had all the right ingredients for a happy, stable home. Yet her daughter received the diagnosis. She attempted to go the route of non-medicating but her daughter was self-injuring which opted her to medicate. However, they are also tackling the disorder with holistic approaches under the supervision of a behavioural specialist.

Jodi - posted on 03/22/2011

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I think the issue I had with the situation I read (and often see) is that the behavioural issues conincide with major life changes, and it is pretty normal for children to react to that in a negative way. So, when there is a situation where the parents split up 1.5 years ago, and at the same time, that child has been booted out of 2 daycare centres in the last 1.5 years, I think it is pure laziness on the doctor's part to diagnose ADHD rather than deal with the true reason for the behavioural issue.

Jenni - posted on 03/22/2011

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No, not at all... if you read my earlier posts I said I wouldn't accept a diagnosis under the age of 7.
And yes, you're right. I do agree that it is often a blanket diagnosis for other underlying issues. I think that's because it's hard to diagnose children with mental illnesses. IE: bi-polar disorder.
From my own personal experience I believe this is true. My brother received the diagnosis of ADHD/ODD. When he reached 11 years old he was then diagnosed with bi-polar disorder and skitzophrenia. So I definitely believe the original diagnosis was a blanket for more serious issues.
So I guess I'm sort of on the fence on this one, in a way. Most of it is due to my incomprehension of *how* difficult it is for a pschologist/psychiatrist to diagnose mental illnesses in children.

Jodi - posted on 03/22/2011

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Also, are you suggesting that an ADHD diagnosis at age 4 is appropriate? A true diagnosis?

Jenni - posted on 03/22/2011

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@Jodi I don't think the problem stems from putting a name to behavioural issues in children. The problem is when the answer to behavioural issues is medication. Putting a name or identifying a pattern of behavioural issues on its own is beneficial. It would help parents tackle those issues in a holistic way. IE: behavioural modification, theropy, family councelling, parenting techniques.



It's when parents and doctors take the easy way out and opt to medicate and not address the issues that are contributing to the disorders where the problems lie.



Oh and I'm speaking of when environment is a factor to the disorder. There are true cases where chemical, biological factors develop into a behavioural disorder.

Jodi - posted on 03/22/2011

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An example of ADHD being overdiagnosed:

http://www.circleofmoms.com/welcome-to-c...



And I see this sort of thing ALL the time around here. My kids has behaviour issues, my kid has some instability in his life because of this that or the other, but hey. he has ADHD. I think that sometimes people are looking for the easy short term answer.



I do believe that ADD and ADHD are very real, but I do believe it is used as an excuse sometimes, which ultimately makes it difficult for the REAL cases because they end up painted with the same brush.

Jenni - posted on 03/22/2011

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Linda, I do think you're on to something there. Phamraseutical companies are big business with big business agendas. That would definitely explain the overdiagnoses factor and the pushing of drugs. Thanks for your insight. It's really helpful. I myself, am strongly against prescription medication and believe in holistic approaches. Luckily for me I found a doctor who is also strongly against medicating. If my son were diagnosed with ADHD or a similar disorder. I would definitely go the route of behavioural modication and theorpy and avoid medicating at all costs. I strongly advocate non-medicating, especially children.

Monique - posted on 03/18/2011

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i dont believe in it!! kids are suppose to be active and hyper! The meds mess with their heads and in my opinion its wrong!!

Meghan - posted on 03/17/2011

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I believe ADD/ADHD exist, but I think they are way to quickly diagnosed. From personal experience, some kids don't sleep enough, don't eat properly and don't receive enough healthy emotional support- imo even one of those things can have negative affects on children that in turn cause them to act out in a hyper/attention seeking manner.

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Hi Bonnie, you dont have to accept such a diagnoses. My son was only labelled at that age, got OT, which did not help, and then at age 6 in Grade R was 'diagnosed' by a Neuro-Pediatrician, Psychologist and OT was severely ADHD and the all recommended Ritalin. We tried in, reluctantly, and side effects was horrible so I took him off and started to look for alternatives. I found Brain Gym therapy and a wonderful therapist. if you want more information contact me @ meerkat@iafrica.com. If you are in South Africa I can help you locate a practitioner in your area. If not I can do distance work on your child, I am now a registered Brain Gym consultant. The soonder you start helping your child the better.Within 3 months my son was not ADHD anymore. He is top of the class and no sign of any of the predicted learning problems.

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Hi Bonnie, you dont have to accept such a diagnoses. My son was only labelled at that age, got OT, which did not help, and then at age 6 in Grade R was 'diagnosed' by a Neuro-Pediatrician, Psychologist and OT was severely ADHD and the all recommended Ritalin. We tried in, reluctantly, and side effects was horrible so I took him off and started to look for alternatives. I found Brain Gym therapy and a wonderful therapist. if you want more information contact me @ meerkat@iafrica.com. If you are in South Africa I can help you locate a practitioner in your area. If not I can do distance work on your child, I am now a registered Brain Gym consultant. The soonder you start helping your child the better.Within 3 months my son was not ADHD anymore. He is top of the class and no sign of any of the predicted learning problems.

Jenn - posted on 03/16/2011

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I think we've all been guilty of that at some point Bonnie - don't beat yourself up about it. :) It's a shame that you had a tough situation to deal with with the housing, and I'm sure was something that wasn't really in your control. The best thing now is like you said, to recognize it and make the needed changes. Sounds like you're on the right track and I hope you get the results you're looking for. Just stick to your guns, especially at those times when it's the hardest - remind yourself why and who it's all about. I wish you all the best.

Bonnie - posted on 03/16/2011

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Yes Jenn, we had very little structure when my son was younger due to our housing situation- we were homeless for 6months when he was 18-24months. That has had a huge impact on my son's behaviour & I wish I had been able to get the help we needed then instead of it escalating to this degree but it's something we're working on. The reasons you pointed out about so many misdiagnoses being more because of parenting style is also a big reason why I'm so sceptical of ADD/ADHD. I know, without a doubt, that some of my son's behaviours are my fault! One of the big things I've had to work on is not swearing at bad drivers! I don't drive but have almost been run over multiple times because of drivers talking on their phone, not paying attention, or who just don't know the road rules! Unfortunately one of those incidents involved a mother, with a child around 9-10months in the back seat, who was speeding & talking on her mobile. She stopped less than a foot short of my son's pram. The fact that she not only put mine & my son's life in serious danger, but her own child's... Lets just say that what came out of my mouth should NEVER be heard again!

Jenni - posted on 03/16/2011

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That link I gave you was a bit general. I think there's a little more to it.

But the thing about these disorders and why people question them is because they *can* develop due to environment (ie: lack of structure). But it's usually a combination of 2 of three things: Biological, Chemical, and/or Environment.

What sets the true diagnosis apart from normal childhood development are two factors: the severity of the behaviour and that these children don't grow out of the developmental stage. That's why as others pointed out they usually wait until 7 years old before they make the diagnosis. Not saying I wouldn't address the issue but I'd certainly look for another opinion when my child is around 7 years old. I personally wouldn't accept a diagnosis before that time. The child could just be immature.

Generally, in a true diagnosis of ADD/ADHD the child never grows past the terrible two developmental stage or is exceptionally delayed socially and emotionally.

Jenn - posted on 03/16/2011

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OK - so without trying to sound like a bitch - but this is part of the reason why I don't think some kids actually have ADD/ADHD. That link to me just describes what you should be doing as a parent - and has nothing to do with a child having ADD/ADHD. I do think that many times when a child is "diagnosed" it's due to the parenting style. Now I'm not saying this is the case with you Bonnie, because I don't know you or anything about you other than what you pointed out, although you yourself said that your child had no boundaries or structure.

Jenni - posted on 03/16/2011

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I added more to my post while you were posting yours ;) but I think you may find what I added encouraging.

Do your own research on the disorder as well. Join Inet support groups so you can compare ideas and remedies with other parents managing children with ADD.

Be forceful to get the support you feel is adequate for your son. Don't let people blow you off because they can't see past your demographics. Show them you are willing to go to whatever lengths it takes to help your son.

See if his psychologist can tell you *exactly* how he determines your son is ADHD.

Jenn - posted on 03/16/2011

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I guess I'm a bit confused why he was seeing a psychologist. But, I do think ADD/ADHD is real, but WAY over-diagnosed. If you don't believe your child has it and are able to manage their behaviour/activity level, then just wait it out. As the others stated, it's usually something that is diagnosed at an older age, so if there is still something going on down the road, perhaps revisit the psychologist. And as for your child being different - how are they different? Your example of the falling down thing - that is how I am as well with my kids. I don't go running and over reacting to a little scrape or bump, and as such my kids tend to not be overly dramatic about hurting themselves. But I don't feel like that makes my kids "different", because a lot of people are like that.

Bonnie - posted on 03/16/2011

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Also, the psych's suggestion was behaviour modification, which was why we were there in the first place!
Another thing that makes me even more sceptical about the diagnoses is that the psych has only spent an hour with my son, in a small office with lots of toys, when they'd never met before. My son will push the boundaries with anyone new, as most children do, & so he pretty much ignored the psych.
My son has also had a very disruptive life thus far. As far as I'm concerned ANY psychologist should be taking that into account when making a diagnoses but this guy seems to be completely ignoring environmental factors, which can cancel out the relevance of some behaviours.

If behaviour modification doesn't help, although it already seems to be, then I may consider accepting a diagnoses of ADHD. But given my son's age & life circumstances thus far, it's not unreasonable to expect his behaviour (I'm not saying it's acceptable, just reasonable given the circumstances of our lives). Psychologically he's been through a hell of a lot for any child to deal with, let alone an almost 5yr old little boy.

Bonnie - posted on 03/16/2011

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JuLeah, I requested a referral to a psychologist about a year & a half ago for an assesment due to my son doing almost everything months earlier than the delevopemental average (his verbal skills at that point were approximately 2yrs ahead). At that point we'd also had a lot of housing issues which caused a lot of confusion for my son with boundaries- we had different rules at almost every place we stayed! My mother also seems to revel in undermining everything I do or say! Because of that we were having issues with my son's behaviour which is why we continued seeing that psychologist. However, she took maternity leave last year & referred us to someone closer to home, which is the psych who has given this diagnoses.
As to the criteria from Cathy & Katherine, while my son does have some of those symptoms, he doesn't have enough to be diagnosed with either ADD or ADHD. My son does have some of the major symptoms but they are all environmental, which the psych is completely ignoring!
My son doesn't sleep anywhere near enough, which is something we're *supposed* to be working on with the psych... Diet isn't a problem. I can't have artificial anything & can't use chemicals of any sort as they cause severe migraines that put me in hospital! As a result my son has a VERY healthy diet!
The main reasons I was given for the diagnoses were my son's lack of fear, his "lack" of attention span, & his MASS of energy.
I refuse to make a fuss if my son hurts himself. To the piont where he rolled his scooter down a ramp last year, got a hug while I gave him a quick check, & rode off again. All he got was a bit of a fright. Had any other child done what mine did, they would have been screaming blue bloody murder! I see far too many parents making a huge fuss over a small scrape that will be gone by the end of the day. Because I don't I've somehow made my son "abnormal". I just don't see any reason to make children afraid of everyday childhood activities.
His "lack" of attention span is due to a lack of dicsipline & boundaries, which is partially my fault & it's something we're working on. Childcare's inability to communicate & tell me what was going on each day was a huge problem but we have a communication book now & my son's behaviour has improved greatly with it's use.
As to my son's energy, it's a family thing. Not one person in my family could ever be accused of a lack of energy, especially when we were kids! My son spends a lot of time playing outside & running around. I would never consider that abnormal in any way.
I guess my big thing is my son's childcare staff have been informed of this diagnoses & are now more relaxed, for lack of a better word, about my son's behaviour. I'm going back to study at the end of the month & we're looking at centres closer to home (the current one takes us an hour to get to as I don't drive). Whilst I don't particularly believe in ADD/ADHD I'm not entirely sure that it's a bad idea to inform a new centre of the diagnoses. As a young single parent with almost no family it is constantly assumed that my son's behaviour is based on my demographics &, in the past, I've found that to be detrimental to improving my son's behaviour- staff don't want to help or implement the same strategies in care as those we use at home. Whereas with an "official" diagnoses staff are more willing to help, at least at his current centre!

Jenni - posted on 03/16/2011

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If you are skeptical, I'd fish around for 2nd, 3rd, 4th... opinions.

See, the tricky thing about these disorders (IMO) and why they are over diagnosed is because most children can exhibit these behaviours (that Cathy pointed out) at different points in their developement. So it comes down to a matter of degrees when compared to *normal* childhood developement. True ADHD/ADD children are at the far end of the spectrum of what's considered normal childhood behaviour. So this is a slippery slope when it comes to diagnosing a child with the disorder. IMO a teacher, school counsellor, family doctor is not qualified to make the diagnosis alone. They may bring to your attention their concerns but as Sara suggest; I'd bring my child to a certified psychologist.



Keep in mind if your son is ADD/ADHD you don't have to take the route of medication unless absolutely necessary. You can find support groups, look into behaviour modification, and councelling to help both you and your son to cope with the disorder.

Many children can be taught to cope with this disorder and function at the level of other children in their age group with the right kind of support, behaviour modification and parental involvement.





Sharon brings an interesting notion to the table with her husband; if directed in a positive way the disorder can have its positives. Were you aware that children with ADD/ADHD are usually very intelligent. They tend to excell at math and science. My sister and I taught my brother (ADHD) how to do multiplication in an afternoon before he even started JK. In grade one he was able to do triple by triple digit multiplication questions in his head. He was/is freakishly quick and smart when it comes to math and science and was always in the top of his class in these subjects.

Sharon - posted on 03/16/2011

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Yes I believe in it.

Yes I think its way over diagnosed.

Yes my oldest was diagnosed with it.

I had a feeling when he was a toddler that he had some sort of hyperactivity disorder. I couldn't get him to sit still for a toddler chunky book. He was only still when he was sleeping. But I didn't go looking for a diagnosis at that age, I just worked around his issues. I was pretty sure he was just a happy active toddler. But when we went out, I was mentally comparing him to other kids we'd meet. All my friends had kids that were grown up so nothing in our recent lives to compare to.

My SIL is a kindergarten teacher, has been for over 20 years. She saw the signs. But I kind of ignored her.

By the time he was 8 his adhd was in full swing and making so many issues for our lives. I HATE medication for what seemed like a discipline issue. But the school was having issues with him daily because he would disrupt class with his activity. We tried diet modification, supplements, so many different things and all of them had to be tried for so long before declaring them failed efforts.

When he was about 11 we tried stratera(sp?). it worked but he hated it. there was so much bad press about other add/adhd drugs that we really didn't want to keep him on it.

My biggest clue about my sons' add/adhd issues - is his dad. when we met I thought "OH wow, he's so young and active! this is awesome." After we got married I thought 'omg he's not young or active, he's a spazz!" he can't sit still to watch a football game, fix a cabinet or fold laundry. He can watch a football game, fixa cabinet AND fold laundry in 15 minute bursts. UGH.

what Katherine and cathy posted was very helpful. My son saw several doctors before we accepted his diagnosis even then, a year later I saw a medical show where they claimed add/adhd can ONLY be 100% verified with an MRI plus the list documentation the ladies mentioned here.

[deleted account]

Who gave the diagnosis? Doctor? Teacher? Psychologist? That's important. Make sure it's a diagnosis from a certified psychologist.

Katherine - posted on 03/16/2011

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Mine are banking on more often than not.

And they do. They just check away. They don't usually do a formal evaluation on the child. Not at first.

Katherine - posted on 03/16/2011

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Sorry you posted the criteria, not JuLeah. I've been up since 5:30a.

Katherine - posted on 03/16/2011

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No, I was just giving her an idea. Which is why her child probably isn't, or may not be ADD.

JuLeah - posted on 03/16/2011

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How did he get diganosed if you don't believe in it? You took him to a doctor? Most doctors don't really know much about ADHD ... they ask a few simple questions and write you a script for drugs.
There are a set of behaviors that can be the result of so many many different things, but often we just call them ADHD.
There are so many reasons a kid might have this set of behaviors, including that they really do have ADHD, but more often then not, they don't. The reason for the behaviors is not ADHD, but the real reason is never addressed, because we don't look for the real reason, just slap an easy lable on it.
Diet, lacl of sleep, long term stress, allergies are just a few of the underline reasons you might be seeing this set of behaviors .... if he does have ADHD, that is okay too .... there are some good things to come out of that, some very positive things, but diet, lack of sleep, stress, and allergies can make the symptoms worse.
It is important to know the real reason so that can be addressed - don't do meds ...
But, no shame in having ADHD - many famous people do and many brilliant (rich) people do -

Katherine - posted on 03/16/2011

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Well...how is he "different?"

I have very mixed feelings about ADD. One time my moms entire class, well 70% were diagnosed with it. I do believe children can be hyper, but children ARE hyper. If that makes sense.
It's so hard to say at that age.....like you already stated. And what would they do? Medicate him? Hell no!!!

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