Restaurant Bans Children Under 6

Sara - posted on 07/12/2011 ( 280 moms have responded )

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So, what are your thoughts on this?

http://www.parentdish.com/2011/07/11/res...

All the noise, noise, NOISE! After 16 years, restaurant owner Mike Vuick has finally had it with all the crying and whining.

And that was just from his customers.

So he decided to placate them -- and soothe his own throbbing temples -- by banning children younger than 6 from his restaurant in Monroeville, Pa.

"Their volume can't be controlled and many, many times, they have disturbed other customers," he tells ABC News. He's talking about the small children, by the way, not the complainers.

Any 5-year-olds who wish to partake of the chicken strips at McDain's Restaurant and Golf Center better hop to it. ABC reports ban kicks in July 16.

"We feel that McDain's is not a place for young children," Vuick says in an email to regular customers.

Vuick describes parents who bring their young children to the restaurant as "impolite and selfish." He adds there will be no exceptions to the new rule.

"We've had the place here for 22 years, and the restaurant for nine, and I've noticed in those nine years there are certain parents who can't leave their children at home," he tells ABC News. "You know, their child -- maybe as it should be -- is the center of their universe. But they don't realize it's not the center of the universe."

Stephanie Kelley, a regular with her 13-month-old son Jameson, is outraged.

"I can't believe this," she tells ABC. "I am offended. This is just an ignorant policy. We really enjoy eating at McDain's, and Jameson is very well-behaved. If they're so concerned about noise, what do they plan to do about the loud people at the bar?"

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Mary - posted on 07/15/2011

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I"m not sure why so many of you think a restaurant needs to be expensive or "classy" to ban kids or place age restrictions on the clientele. Sometimes people want to enjoy their wings, fries and beer without the presence of preschoolers. I don't think that pleasure should just be reserved for entrees over 30 bucks.

Again, we come back to the fact that a business owner made a business decision. His customers complained and expressed their opinions. He not only listened, but responded.

So far, it seems to be both a financially smart move, as well as one that has the support of the surrounding population. A local TV station conducted a poll about it. Over 10,000 people responded. 64% were in favor of the ban, 10% didn't care, and only 26% were against it. As well, it's been reported by more than one article I read that since announcing the ban, his business has gone UP.

http://www.myfoxphoenix.com/dpps/news/of...

So, for those of you outraged or offended by this policy - boycott away. You'll be in the minority. Apparently, banning the under-6 crowd IS a good business move.

Isobel - posted on 07/13/2011

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I agree with Amie, and I'll take it one step further.



If your child throws a fit in a public place where people are paying to relax and you do not remove said child...you have ZERO manners.



That being said, my children HAVE had fits in public...most have, but I remove them because it's not a strangers job to deal with the fact that MY kid is having a rough day.



oh and, if I had a kid with Aspergers that was 9 and was prone to unpredictable behaviour and I saw a sign that said no children under 7...I'm pretty sure I would know it included us.

Mary - posted on 07/17/2011

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Chrissey, I don't mean this rudely, but I think your last post exemplifies why a restaurant like the one in question feels compelled to put an actual ban in place.



If more/most parents looked at a restaurant, and took note of the fact that there was not a specific kid's menu (or the absence of other things such as cups w/lids, crayons and paper placemats, etc.) and realized that it didn't really want small kids there, there would be no problem. When I am i the position of choosing a place for my family to dine, I always pick a place that I know offers these accommodations for the preschool crowd. There are a more than a handful of places in the city (Baltimore) that I like, but do not offer these little kid-friendly touches. I don't then look at the menu and say, "Well, she'll eat a bit of that fettuccine, or she can just eat some of my shrimp scampi off the bread plate"....I take the (not-so-subtle) hint that it is not a place that really wants kids. I either pick another place to eat with her, or (if I really want to eat there) I only go when I have a sitter for her. I do not blatantly disregard the fact that the restaurant is not kid-friendly, and take her there anyway.



Perhaps if more of the patrons of this establishment had read these cues, and refrained from bringing their kids, the owners would not have been forced to enact this ban. My guess is, they would have tolerated the occasional well-behaved kid. Instead, it sounds like despite the fact that the place did nothing to suggest they were kid-friendly, (some) people insisted on ignoring the lack of kiddie amenities, and still brought their babies and toddlers. Which in turn, forced the owner to clearly spell things out for those people who were either clueless, or just didn't care that it was not a place that wanted small kids.

Mary - posted on 07/14/2011

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I do wonder if some of the perspectives on here are shaped by the dynamics of the areas we live in.

My sister, who lives in a fairly affluent area of Northern VA, has a much different perspective on this when her kids were smaller. Her community is almost all families with kids. Pretty much every restaurant, store, or whatever is exceptionally kid-friendly. It's almost surreal just how much all of their businesses cater to families with small children. However, as I said, the vast majority of their population is made up families.

She used to really struggle when she would come up to the greater Baltimore area, and found that many of the amenities she was used to places having in place for the under 6 age group were not available everywhere. She was absolutely indignant at the mere thought that a restaurant did not have cups with lids, or crayons with paper menus, or any of the other kid-friendly things she just assumed were automatic in all venues.

She really didn't get that small children were NOT welcome everywhere. Baltimore (and it's surrounding suburbs) is a large, diverse city that is made up of many different age groups. There may be certain neighborhoods that are comprised of mostly families, but certainly not the entire zip code (like where she lives). There are many, many places that are family oriented, but there are also a fair number of places that are not. It's not that kids are banned, it's just that the establishment doesn't make special accommodations for them, since they are not a predominant part of their clientele. THey don't need to put in an age restriction, since most people have the common courtesy to not drag their small kids to these places.

For her, living in her small bubble in VA, it was a huge shock to realize that not every public place on the planet caters to families. I was appalled at how she expected the entire world around her to cater to her kids.

Mary - posted on 07/12/2011

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I think he is well within his rights to make that choice. For those who are "offended" - well - the solution is simple: Eat elsewhere. I really have no problem with establishments that want to make themselves a kid-free zone. I personally have no misplaced sense of entitlement about being able to bring my child everywhere with me. There really are some places where she's not wanted - and that's just fine by me.



This place is part of golf club. There is no children's menu. It's not a kid-friendly place, so why people would insist on bringing their kids there is a little beyond me to begin with. However, I do have to admit that I am one of those people who is very conscientious about not allowing my child to be disruptive to those around us, especially in dining establishments, even if it is just the local family pizza parlor.



If this was a place that the hubby & I frequented, it really wouldn't bug me that they had instituted this policy. We would either eat elsewhere with her, or find a sitter if I simply couldn't live without a fix of their crab cakes (or whatever). I sure as hell wouldn't waste my time getting pissed about it, or see it as a personal slam against the behavior of my offspring.



TBH, as a parent now, I almost wish more places did this. On the rare night I get to eat out without my little love bug, I really don't want to see or hear other people's kids, even if they are absolutely angelic. If there were a place around here that baned small kids, you can bet your ass the hubby and I would be checking it out the next time we got a sitter!

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Cyndel - posted on 08/21/2011

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It is the owners decision...and a few restaurants I think should ban children..not for noise but because of the inappropriateness of the atmosphere for children, either bar like atmospheres or very formal, neither are appropriate for children under a certain age. But it better not become the rule or they will start loosing a lot of customers.

LadyJane - posted on 08/18/2011

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I love Chuckie Cheese, we have one close to me and while I don't go there much with my kids, the last time I went was in 2006, but it's still there and in operation...

As for the ban, well, I really don't know of any restaurant where I live that has banned children under 6yrs old. So I really am not sure about it.

Where I am at... There are "Bar/restaurants that never get children at all there and I'm not sure if it's just because it's next to a McDonalds on one side and a Big Boy on the other. Could be. No kids have ever been seen in that one... So I guess we're not really all that concerned about it here.

Mary Renee - posted on 08/18/2011

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Here's the thing... I can see why someone would do this, people under 21 aren't allowed in bars, right? Although I would hate for this to become a "trend" with other restaurants.



To be honest, I actually hate when people invite me and my one-year-old out to dinner at a nice restaurant. I go but I'm always thinking, have you ever met a one-year-old before? She doesn't want to stay in the highchair, she's bored before we even get to order our food. I spend more time entertaining her and trying to get her to eat and don't get to enjoy the meal at all! I'd rather eat in someone's home or a family-friendly place so I can just relax.



I don't think it should be a "ban" though. That's discrimination. Maybe it would be better if they had one night designated as "family night"



Or have no kids menu and no highchairs or booster seats and then people would get the idea. Oh well, they're losing out on money from families eating there, right? Instead of a table for 4 they only get tables for 2.

Stifler's - posted on 08/17/2011

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I took my 18 month old son to the pub for lunch the other week and he just wandered around the dining room and went in and out of the kids room door 100 times. "He's very well behaved" said my friend's sister. I was like LOGAN COME BACK 100 times. I expected him to like start pulling the tables over and steal knives and forks but he didn't he was more interested in laughing at himself in the mirrors.

Stifler's - posted on 08/17/2011

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my kid makes a mess and stuff. i just pick up all the fries and stuff and put it on the plate with our leftover food and wipe any spills with a baby wipe. no one has ever said anything to me. as long as your kid isn't hollering non stop who really cares.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 08/17/2011

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But what is proper behaivour for say a 3 year old? When my older child was 3 she did know how to sit for a while and I would keep her entertained with crayons and such.

As for complaining about the mess are we also going to discriminate against adults with special needs next? Because I've taken care of a few stroke patients and they make a mess too

Maggie - posted on 08/17/2011

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If your kids can't behave then you shouldn't take them to any restaurant.

Sam - posted on 08/17/2011

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I agree with the owner, I work in the food industry and the little kids are the worst, the mess the noise. There is a big difference between a kid being loud in a reatraunt and someone being loud in a pub, you kind of expect that at a pub. The owner might lose a little buisness at first but he will very likely get some new customers because of his choice.

Nicole - posted on 08/17/2011

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i am a mom of a 17 month old and i am not out raged by this . not because i cant partake in eating there cause its a state over so it doesnt matter...but because its a curtesouy factor.

out of curtousy we get a sitter to frequent a resturant here ,stancatos. so we can sit in the lounge and enjoy an QUIET dinner. yes you get the loud ppl at the bar but they are not screaming like my daughter soes when she is tired of sitting in the high chair. and i dont have to let my food get cold cause i removed her and am now either in the bathroom or parking lot till the tantrum is over or the energy blown.

mothers day the first half of the meal was spent in the parking lot while my little one played wiht me and grandma while the rest of the family was waiting for the food at the table >

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 08/05/2011

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Well in Canada- or at least British Columbia where I live- a resturaunt can legally ban any under the age of 19 if the place is known as more of a pub than an actual resturaunt.

That said I'm a mom of 2 girls almost 7 and almost 5 months. No they aren't always the quietest or best behaived children, but my husband's closest family is 40 mins away and if we do go out we take them with us. This place could end up losing business from younger parents.
I agree more with the woman at the end of the article, what do you do with loud pub goers?

Jay - posted on 08/02/2011

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the word age-ism comes to mine.... illegal in Ireland anyway.... to discriminate because of someones age. I mean is the legal for him to do there? x

Becky - posted on 07/18/2011

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Yeah, that is the one thing that bothers me a bit about banning children under the age of 6. Typically, there is a big difference between bringing a newborn out to eat and a toddler, or even older infant. We ate out a lot more often when our oldest was a newborn than we do now, because it was easy. He didn't need a seat, he didn't need a meal, and generally, he'd sleep through the meal or sit contentedly on someone's lap. If he started fussing, I'd pop him on the breast and problem solved. I understand that it's probably hard to impose a lower age limit like that - like infants under 6 months are okay, but between 6 months to 6 years are banned. And of course, not all newborns are easy-going and will sleep through the whole meal. I can see it being annoying if someone brought their colicky newborn out to a nice place and he or she screamed the entire meal! But I can understand someone who had previously enjoyed this place on a regular basis and who now couldn't come because they had a newborn they couldn't leave behind being annoyed with the ban.

Stifler's - posted on 07/18/2011

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We used to go out once every week for dinner until Logan turned 1. I'd feed him before we went and he'd fall asleep in the corner with a blanket over the pram, his elmo and dummy. After that he gave up his dummy, was cranky, refused to go to sleep in the pram and we ordered our food once and ended up calling my friend and asking if we could drop him over for an hour and never have taken him anywhere nice again.

Michelle - posted on 07/18/2011

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As a mom, I applaud this owner. Like a lot of you, I was very respectful of others when we were our with our infant, then toddler, preschool daughter. My ex was very much a restaurant affecionado, so we ate out at nice restaurants at least twice a week. If / when she got fussy, and wouldn't be calmed (teething, mainly), I'd get up and take her outside. My ex would then have the waiter pack up our food to take home, or, if it hadn't arrived yet, get it 'to go'. Never, EVER, have we sat through a fussy baby night, or a tantrum. My parents (and his) raised us better than that.
I will say this, though. My ex is/was a regular at our local TruLucks, and took our daughter there for their Wednesday visit. If it was slow, he'd let her have free rein--the maitre'd and his 'partner', the chef, adored her. The maitre'd would let her accompany him on seating patrons, handing out the menus (in his defense, it was other regulars who knew and liked her and her dad)...and the chef would let her watch him cook. I never permitted it..but after our divorce, when she was 2, 3 years old..it was a weekly thing.
But, not all parents are like us, and I will say on date night, me and my husband do not want to get all dressed up and drop a big chunk of money going to a nice restaurant....only to have some kids running wild all over the place...and the parents sitting there, oblivious to the disturbance their 'darlings' are causing. But you can bet your bottom dollar, if their babies get hurt by colliding with a waiter, waitress, busboy...they'll be yelling at that worker while dialing their lawyer.

Hayley - posted on 07/18/2011

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oh definitely not...I agree. Kids can get very irritable when they're tired. Tired kids & food don't mix lol!

Becky - posted on 07/18/2011

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Yeah, I wouldn't be taking my kids out to eat after 8! That's bath and bedtime! Even if we're travelling and get in to the hotel late, we do roomservice or order in rather than going out at that hour. You can't expect young kids to behave when they're tired and over hungry.

Hayley - posted on 07/18/2011

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I don't think there is anything wrong with a no children policy in a decent restaurant. One near me says no young children after 8pm....i think thats fair enough as its late enough for a family to got out for dinner and leaves the rest of the evening for the grown ups. A flat out ban in my opinion is unfair and harsh :(

Becky - posted on 07/17/2011

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Red Robin closed in Calgary. I was quite bummed. We've never tried the White Spot. Our favorites for going out with the kids are Boston Pizza and Montanas. Actually, I just like Montanas because I love their corn bread!
We've only taken the boys to a fancy place once, and that was when my youngest sister got married. It was a very small, family only wedding and we went to a fairly ritzy place in Banff for the reception. So of course, the kids were with us. They all did fine.

Angela - posted on 07/17/2011

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Well when I was younger and my all my kids lovedf Chuck E Cheese. The pizza and salad bar were not the prime reason we loved it. I never considered it horrible food but then again we don't go out as a family for great food expectations but a great time. I guess I find it not any worse than Happy Meals but a lot more fun.

I liked it because I could take all kids, of all ages and they had fun! I could sit and relax and even have a drink of (not posh Beer or Wine) but still the whole point was I could relax the kids had a great time and all was well.

In fact I think in North America and sounds like Oz their is a great amount of choice and facilities compared to Europe in general.

If a place is not child friendly I just don't go...it is not fun for me at all! Not any high chairs, a wiggly toddler wanting to run all over the place... not eating the food... Crying...it is unfair not only to others but my toddler as well.

I think it is a fine line when we talk about discrimination. If you could not find any family establishments and everyone started to only cater to adults it would be heading down the road of discrimination.

I think some circumstance you should never be able to ban children and it is out right discrimination. I don't think it is fair to say you can only ride in the back of the bus or train etc... comfort should not be for adults only. (use as an example only) If you do not offer any services to families and they have not a choice you should not ban them.

Vegemite - posted on 07/17/2011

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Oh Chuck E Cheese. I wish we still had them, they were the best but the last closed down in the late 80's. They were called Charlie Cheeses in Australia.

Johnny - posted on 07/17/2011

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I just wanted to add that this can be challenging when traveling. Here, many towns do not have family chains. They have fast food joints or small family-run restaurants. They are not specifically catering to families but are generally happy to serve kids. We do not eat fast food (unless there is a deli or a Subway) so the local "casual dining" spot is our best choice.

Johnny - posted on 07/17/2011

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That place does not look good enough to ban kids. It looks pretty average and the menu is definitely nothing special. Many chains have kid menus but here most smaller places don't. That does not mean they are not welcoming to children. Many are but are happy to just make smaller meals off the menu. Which is great because a lot of times those kids menus have a lot of junk like fried chicken and onion rings.



I have never considered taking my child to a fine dining establishment or a comparable type of establishment. But when casual is in the name I would not worry about it. I expect my daughter to behave well, stay in her seat, keep her voice level down and show her manners. We always bring lots for her to do, colouring and books, but I do occasionally see some parents who haven't bothered.



It does irritate me because when my kid sees some other uncontrolled little hooligan running around the restaurant, climbing into other diner's booths and eating off the floor, she wants to know why she can't. And then the problems start and one of us ends up spending the meal sitting in the car with her so that she does not disturb anyone. Argh. Generally this happens when happens when we are at one of the "family restaurant" chains that some parents seem to have mistaken for Chuck E Cheese.



But this dump?.....HA!

[deleted account]

I don't see the problem if you don't like it eat elsewhere.

There was a girl of approx 2yo wandering and running around this pizza restaurant we were in, now although I wouldn't let my child wander around a restuarant I don't particularly have an issue with that, the running and screaming on the other hand, I do have a problem with. BUT this child was not only getting in the servers way (and she nearly knocked food out of the servers hands on several occasions) she was wandering/ running up to occupied tables and taking food off them and her parents did NOTHING they just continued talking to each other, the poor waitress tried to take her back to her parents several times but as soon as she moved away the girl was back to running around. Not only is this incredibly rude of her parents (their daughter was stealing food!), it was dangerous (the child could have been burned by the hot food, slipped and hurt herself etc) and it was not appropriate. However that is the ONLY case I have seen that I can remember.

Just because I have only been bothered by one incident (we eat out regularly or at least before I was a SAHM we did) it doesn't mean that others haven't complained or been bothered by children that I felt were behaving ok, to ban children under 6 the manager of this restaurant must have had several complaints about their behaviour, I'm sure if he gets complaints about older children they will be banned as well - but as it stands he obviously hasn't had enough complaints (if any) to warrant them not being allowed in the restaurant.

Stifler's - posted on 07/17/2011

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`Jodi they give kids colouring in and stuff here. We took Greg and Jos kids out for my 21st and their 8 year old was given colouring in to do and free ice cream and this place was like a place where entrees were $30 each and there was no kids menu.

April - posted on 07/17/2011

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If I were the owner, I wouldn't have gone for an all out ban. I would have set times where parents can bring their children in. Typically, those who are having a date usually do so in the evening or night, so why not designate a block of time, say 12 to 3, where parents can bring their kids? Seems like a way to save some customers, if you ask me. ps. the ban doesn't bother me, i'd just go somewhere else!

Vegemite - posted on 07/17/2011

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yeah I've never come across any of those things even at the places I know are kid friendly (having high chairs would be the indication here). As I said my kids don't eat off the kids menu as, I'd forgotten, it's not enough food. Even when they were one the portions were too small, especially for my 2yr old who eats more than my husband and I do. So I just look to see if there's plenty of kid friendly food and think that that's an indication kids are ok. Maybe I need to look at both kids menu and the regular menu or just ring to find out if they have high chairs but I've never come across a restaurant that didn't have high chairs except those that have celebrity chefs.

[deleted account]

Plus the food at Red Robin is just ok. Nothing to rave & rant about at all. Just OK food. Most of the chain restaurants serve just OK food here. Except the Greek restaurant we love. Great food and it caters to families. But yeah, the colors and activity placemats keep the kids occupied & entertained. Any place with a spearate kid's menu is expecting to serve kids. And trust me, Chuck E Cheese is beyond horrible-even my kid hates their pizza! We'll go there to play the games, but not to eat!

[deleted account]

Plus the food at Red Robin is just ok. Nothing to rave & rant about at all. Just OK food. Most of the chain restaurants serve just OK food here. Except the Greek restaurant we love. Great food and it caters to families. But yeah, the colors and activity placemats keep the kids occupied & entertained. Any place with a spearate kid's menu is expecting to serve kids. And trust me, Chuck E Cheese is beyond horrible-even my kid hates their pizza! We'll go there to play the games, but not to eat!

Mary - posted on 07/17/2011

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I have a Red Robin less than 5 miles from me. Molly loves it, although, I have to confess I try to avoid it because of the damned balloons they give out; I hate trying to get them home, and, OH, the drama if it slips out of her grasp and flies off into the sky...

I do like their food, though, and it really is a great place for families (unless you're a crap mommy like me!)

Angela - posted on 07/17/2011

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Well I think parents need to find family friendly places to eat, that is what we do for the sake of our sanity and others.

It is just too bad that a person would have to make a ban and parents did not use common sense. Especially in the USA their are so many great family fun places to eat! However even in NL we have less choice but I go online and find a family rest. I look for kids areas to play, etc.. If I want a nice quiet meal I would not think of doing so with my toddler!

It just sounds so harsh to say BAN, but I would rather know if a place was NOT child friendly.

Over here in NL I wish their was more family kid friendly places...I would kill for a Chucky Cheese ...

[deleted account]

There a two restaurants off the top of my head that provide everything Mary has mentioned, and they're both AWESOME, and if we're going out I have a hard time chooses between them. Do you have Red Robin in the US? I know you don't have White Spot, because it's exclusive to Canada's western provinces.

Jodi - posted on 07/17/2011

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I find that interesting :) It's pretty unusual here. I actually used to pack a few things in a bag to take with me when the kids were younger. And I always packed a sippy cup and their own kids cutlery to take with us.



I remember when I was a kid, kids were NOT catered for at all. Mum used to load up with entertainment whenever they took us out. And for us, a dinner out was at the local pub.

Mary - posted on 07/17/2011

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Ah, Jodi - most of the kid-friendly places, which have kid's menus, serve their drinks as either juice boxes, or they have plastic cups with a lid and straw that you can take home with you (joy, just what I need - more crap!). Molly pretty much drinks everything out of regular cups now at home, but the lid factor is nice when I'm out, and a little more conscientious about spillage. She's only two, so that is still an issue. At home, she only gets water or milk, but she quickly caught onto to the juice-when-out concept from her cousins!

I have to say, most places around here (that are kid friendly) do give out little packs of crayons and something for them to color with. I'm not sure it did the parents any favors, since kids pretty much learn to expect that whenever, and wherever, they eat out. My bag always has a supply of crayons, a coloring book, and other toddler-amusement crap to keep her occupied in restaurants while we wait for our food in the rare event they don't have such diversions on hand. However, around here, if a place doesn't provide these little niceties, it's usually a good indication that they don't want little kids. All the bigger chains, like Friday's, The Outback, or Applee's provide this type of stuff, in addition to a kid's menu. That's why I'm a little surprised when some posters who are from the US make statements that society is growing less tolerant of kids. Compared to when you and I were children, places seem to cater to them (and their parents) a whole lot more!

Jodi - posted on 07/17/2011

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I actually find this "cups with lids" and "crayons and paper placemats" very interesting, because I have actually NEVER come across a restaurant here with cups with lids, and the paper placemats are a rarity, as are the crayons.....which is why, when I check a restaurant out, I look at their menu, and whether there is actually a kids menu.



Our kids are now older, so I don't always look for a kids menu any more, but it is something that used to be a big deal for me.



Maybe that explains, however, some cultural differences?

Stifler's - posted on 07/17/2011

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HAHA I remember eating happy meals as a teenager. Sometimes I wish they let adults order the kids meals but in the fine print on the menu it's like UNDER 12 ONLY. Most places here kids eat free on Monday and get free ice cream with their meal every other day.

Jodi - posted on 07/17/2011

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But again, we are talking about the MAJORITY of kids. MOST children under 6 would order from a specific kids menu and it would be more than enough to eat. I know very few places that have kids menu sizes that are so small your under 6 year old would still be hungry. McDonalds Happy Meals are probably the smallest I've experienced. By the time our boys were about 4 or 5 they weren't big enough :D But they are actually TINY.

Vegemite - posted on 07/17/2011

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That's right I ordered kids meals for my boys before and got a piddly little meal and had to order more food. Ended up costing more than just ordering a normal meal. Have never even looked at a kids menu since so wouldn't know what they're about.
My boys can put it away, can't even imagine what feeding them is going to be like when they're older.
I still think it's a little strange to have mostly a kid friendly menu in a restaurant to start with, then banning kids under 6 as well. It's supposed to be a restaurant not hasty tasty. mmmm hasty tasty...KFC

Jodi - posted on 07/17/2011

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Chrissey, a kids menus is more about the size of the meal, and as a result, ends up, generally, about half the price of the adult menu.

Vegemite - posted on 07/16/2011

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haha I see the point but nearly the whole menu is a kids menu so one wouldn't need to be added on top.

Stifler's - posted on 07/16/2011

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Kids menus around here are always shit food. Nuggets and chips.. $9.95 Kids fish and chips... $12.95.. Spaghetti bolognaise $10.50 and so on.

Amie - posted on 07/16/2011

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Ya, I have to agree with Jodi. There is no specific kids menu. My kids can and have eaten everything that is on that menu. (Even chicken marsala, does that make me a horrible parent? LOL!!)

When I see a family friendly restaurant, I see a kids menu. Places that are a bit more upscale, it's generally close to the same as the adults menu with smaller portions for the child as well as a few of the steady kid friendly favorites.

This has none of that. I really don't see what's wrong with the decor either. From the descriptions I was reading I was expecting something a bit more rustic than what I saw.

Jodi - posted on 07/16/2011

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Chrissey, I think Mary is referring to a *specific* kids menu, you know, like family restaurants generally have.

Vegemite - posted on 07/16/2011

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These are the only things on their menu I wouldn't consider kids menu items.

Sirloin Steak

Stuffed Flounder

Reef & Beef

Chicken Ashlee

Chicken Parmesan

Stuffed Rigatoni

Egg Plant Parmesan

Shrimp Cocktail

Crab-Stuffed Mushrooms

Chicken Marsala

salads (mine can't wrap their heads around eating leaves)

Hearty Chili soup

Jalapeno Poppers

Shrimp Basket & Fries



Most of the menu is like a kids menu, that alone would make me think the restaurant is geared towards children.

Mary - posted on 07/16/2011

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Chrissey, are we talking about the same place?

http://www.mcdains.com/3.html

The dinner entrees range from $9.95 (pasta) to $21.95 (Reef & Beef). They do have a "lite fare" menu which has sandwiches and appetizers, and does have stuff that a kid would eat, like a hot dog or grilled cheese. However, I don't think that makes it kid-friendly; it just allows the customer to eat like a kid if they so chose.

Personally, I love grilled cheese. As a half-assed Catholic who doesn't like seafood, it's one of my favorites on those Fridays during Lent when I still refrain from eating meat (just in case doing so would send me straight to hell ;-) ). I'd go there just to enjoy a grilled cheese sandwich that I didn't have to make, and then share with my toddler!

Vegemite - posted on 07/16/2011

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Really I thought nearly the whole menu was kid like. Maybe it's just my taste but I wouldn't eat at a place with a menu like that unless I was taking my kids.

Mary - posted on 07/16/2011

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I agree with Cathy - when I initially googled this place days ago, nothing about it's website gave the impression that it was family-oriented. It's spartan decor and moderate prices aside, it does not have a kid's menu. That, to me, is a rather telling indication that it is NOT kid-friendly.

As well, even if it meets your definition of family oriented, it's obvious that the bulk of the patrons, as well as the owner, do not agree with your assessment.

Jodi - posted on 07/16/2011

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Imagine how much of a tip the waiting staff are probably now getting from the customer who HAVE maintained their patronage and are now getting a better experience!!!

Vegemite - posted on 07/15/2011

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Mary it's not just price of meals but the feel of a restaurant. If there's a restaurant with a family orientation, such as McDain's, then one expects to find family there with their small kids. I don't care at all if some restaurants don't want children under 6 there's other places to go. I just think it's a bit silly to have a restaurant like this, which is obviously geared towards families in the style it's furnished, the type of food on the menu and the prices then ban small kids. Saying it's "not a place for young children".

Sal - posted on 07/15/2011

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i think he was quiet aware of losing the family demographic.....he was aiming to keep the other demographics,

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