School cancels recess...

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Tara, I have nothing against homeschooling and have even considered doing it for my children. I know many homeschoolers and have done some research and for the most part, homeschoolers do better in college and beyond. Plus all the homeschoolers I know are just really good people in general. You can't argue with results. But perhaps those results are what they are because of the type of people that generally chose to homeschool? Just a thought.

But I still disagree with your statement that children are being raised at school. As I teacher, I saw my students project what they'd been taught at home, morally and emotionally. Sure it can influence other kids, but then it's up to those parents to teach their children that not everyone will agree, and THIS is how I EXPECT you to act, not how little Johnny acts. Vigilant parenting can and will have a greater influence on a child than another child (or sometimes teacher) that they will only be in contact with for a school year.

Just so you know, I've personally decided against homeschooling, just because we live in the best school district in our state. My husband and I both grew up in these schools, my mom teaches here, I used to teach here, and I know the majority of the teachers and many of the families. But if we didn't live here, it would be homeschool all the way. =)

Sharon - posted on 08/25/2010

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LMAO @ the school girls servicing the boys - good lord. And um just where did they get this idea? I can promise you if there was a line of boys and a line of girls - the idea came from elsewhere. One girl & One boy I wouldn't be surprised, they talked each other into it. But I remember the backyard - I'll show you mine if you'll show me yours situations and 1. someone almost always backed out, 2. it took considerably longer than 15 minutes to talk each other into, 3. It took DAYS to get around to it even because of the nervousness and feelings of "this ain't right, we are sooo gonna get busted."

Tara - congrats on homeschooling - but I have my issues with that too. Including the "tied to the apron strings forever, never exposed to the real world in anyway or group situations that aren't carefully monitored and controlled by mommy" bullshit. But hey they're your kids.

I don't know what sort of crack neighborhood you live in but here recess is monitored by teachers and classroom aides. They aren't turned out like zoo animals relying on the walls to keep them out of mischief. Yes, some do better at monitoring kids than others. They also control the number of kids and age of kids in the recess area. Kindergarten through 2nd grade have their own playground. 3rd - 5th have their playground and 6 - 8 have theirs. Only in the morning before school starts are all the age groups out of the school at once and on their respective playgrounds. Throughout the day - recess is staggard so fewer staff are needed outside. The school is set up a bit like an octagon - 3 sides are play ground and sports fields and the other sides are parking lot. Each is fenced off and gated from one another as well as fenced off from the outside property. The institutional model has done quite well by my younger two kids - my oldest needed more from me - and they all test out well above their age groups and respective grades.

Recess is necessary - free time - free play - are necessary. Whether being homeschooled or institutionalised, as its been referred to. Fuck even the boxed up retards get free time. Supervised but free.

At home - we're always learning - its in everything - its a matter of looking into whatever raises their curiosity.

I love & nurture my kids at home - at school they are educated.

Tah - posted on 08/24/2010

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i wouldnt be surprised if they cancel class at this point, they arent preparing them for anything anyway....we rank like crap compared to everyone else...no music, no play, because someones feelings may get hurt..but again not surprised when they give everyone on teams a trophy so noone feels left out..i wish i had taped some of my developmental pysch class and posted it on here, i would take abnormal from him just to do it...like he said we set our children up for failure when we dont prepare them for the real world and you only get one chance to do it because when they are grown it's too late...

Jodi - posted on 08/24/2010

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Oh, for fuck's sake, what are they gonna do next?



Wrong. Kids do need unstructured play. All those reasons they cited "unstructured recess can lead to fights, injuries, or some children feeling left out." are an important part of our development and preparation for later life. But hey, let's not hurt anyone's feelings, because life is always going to treat them well - what do they need to toughen up for?

Jodi - posted on 08/28/2010

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@ Tara, Children only have about 1 hour of recreation time at school in which to heavily interact with their peers outside of the structured education in the classroom.



Unless you control who your children's friends are, and control all their time with those friends, your children would be exposed to children with different values too, and would face the same issues. There is absolutely nothing wrong with this, it is a way for children to learn some right from wrong. I think you underestimate how strong the values that come from home actually are. And surprisingly, I have found with my children, they tend to gravitate towards other children who come from homes with very similar values.



Having studied psychology, I know that values that are learned in those early years are very strongly ingrained in us. It will take more than an hour in a school yard per day to undo the constant teachings of a parent.



And that unstructured playtime is also the time that our children do learn what other people's values are, and it can be a way of learning right from wrong, actions and consequences. It teaches them to cope with this independently. Being exposed to other children's values is not necessarily a negative thing.



I am not knocking homeschooling, I don't think it is a bad thing, but I do think that you seem to hold some very skewed views of mainstream education, and that is possibly only due to your personal experience, so is understandable.

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April - posted on 08/29/2010

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children need unstructured play for their development. not only does it aid in physical development but it helps their brains too. im pretty sure there are a few studies that have already shown that recess helps kids do better in class.

Tara - posted on 08/29/2010

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Hi again, lol
This is a link to famous homeschooled people. It's an excellent read, with all kinds of names you wouldn't expect on it.
Did you know that all the presidents on Mount Rushmore were either self educated or taught at home? They had no formal schooling per say.
Anyhow thought it might be of interest to some of you.
:)
http://www.famoushomeschoolers.net/

Jodi - posted on 08/29/2010

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" My kids were peace makers at school."



When I read this, I just had a "wow" moment. This may be why my children do well in the schools they are in :)



Taylah is in a Catholic Primary School (the same one Jayden was in before High School), and it is a St Francis of Assisi .... and their value is "Peacemakers". And that is the basic core value of the school (which I love). They learn a new peacemaking value each week, and they bring that home and discuss it with us. Any time there is an issue, we talk about how that isn't being a peacemaker.



So you are right, it also depends on the child, but the school and that individual's school's values is important too. Maybe I am just fortunate that I have such a wonderful school nearby, and that I can afford the fees.

Tara - posted on 08/29/2010

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I would have to answer that it depends on the child. My oldest two children were in public school until grades 5 and 2 respectively.
My oldest child was an above average student, very bright but not motivated at school. He was always done his work before the other kids, he was told he should just colour at his desk until everyone else was done. After 6 months of him getting straight A's and the utmost praise from all his teachers, his grades started to slip, he stopped going over and above. He told his teacher that he was bored.
Once we had him home, his learning accelerated. He was free to read the books he wanted to, free to move ahead in his workbooks and free to learn whatever he wanted. He wasn't bored anymore, and soon enough he loved learning again.
My issues with school are many, but being told what to learn, when to learn it and how to learn it, is counter productive to my goal of wanting my kids to love learning and to learn how to learn on their own.
3 of my children are auto didactic, so they wouldn't do well in a classroom setting at all, but excel at home because they have the freedom to continue their learning free of any pressures of how and when etc.
2 of my kids like the hands on approach, they enjoy being "taught". We even play "school", lol
I understand your point about values being taught at home and it depends on how strong those values are whether or not a child chooses to live by then outside of the home. The fact remains that values taught at home should carry on into school life, but it's not always the case. My kids were peace makers at school. Regular UN type diplomats, lol but that didn't serve them at school. Even their teachers said "It's unfortunate but your kids are too nice and too fair." she then went on to tell me how my son was always trying to help others sort out their differences in a fair and respectful way, and ended up being teased for being a sissy, lol. It didn't bother him, his attitude was "if they want to fight, then fine they can fight, but not me."
I just wanted my kids to grow up with a very intact sense of who they are, what their place is, and be strong in their own convictions.
They could have done all that at school, just with more difficulty and more stress, which all take away from core learning.
If kids in school are prepped for a test, do the test and then are re-tested two months later, more than 50% of them won't remember most of the information they had learned previously.
That is not core learning, that is busy work intended to prove that they are indeed learning.
Core learning happens when the information is digested not force fed. What is the point in teaching anything if they won't remember it in 6 months???
Anyhow, way... off topic.
Been hs'ing for over 9 years now, wouldn't change a thing and have seen nothing but excellent results, academically, socially and emotionally.
:)tara

Jodi - posted on 08/29/2010

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I totally understand what you are saying Tara :) I agree that all children learn differently. I am just saying that mainstream education does not mean an assault on the basic values a parent is trying to instil in their own children. It really depends on how those values have been taught to the children in their very early years. As I said, I have nothing against homeschooling.



As per an earlier comment, are the homeschooled children doing better because those children, due to the home environment and the support they receive, would have done better in mainstream school anyway? We probably will never know, but that is a possibility. Because we all know that children with greater support at home will do better at school.



I know how much I have to support my son when he has major assessments due, from awareness on due dates, to being able to discuss his assignments with him (even down to reading his books). I have the education and ability to help point him in the right direction for his answers. There are a lot of parents who don't or can't do that. So is it that these kids would do well whether at school or homeschooled, whether in public or private, whether in a good or bad area?



Anyway, I guess we've gone WAY off topic, LOL. But it is certainly an interesting thought :)

Tara - posted on 08/29/2010

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Hi again Jodi,
my views of mainstream education are what they are due not only to my experiences but also from my research on early childhood development, emotional intelligence and physiology of learning.
A few good books are "the well trained mind" and "teach your own". Both of these books detail why home schooled children have an advantage over mainstream educated children.
School isn't evil, it's just not ideal to learning. There is a tremendous amount of homogenization that occurs within a school classroom. Meaning that education is not tailored to each child's on style of learning, but rather things are taught in a fashion that most kids will get. So if you are an auditory learner, or a visual learner or if you learn kinetically, it doesn't really matter in school, you are taught the way the teacher teaches. At home I can tailor my lessons so that I know all my kids will be learning things on a core level. They will not forget the lessons taught because they are taught in a fashion that matches their own learning style. They are allowed to progress at their own rate and in their own style, making learning easier and more applicable to their own lives.
Again, to each their own, my kids are receiving the best education I can give them, for their mind, body and spirit.
:)tara

Heather - posted on 08/28/2010

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Maybe if they feel there's a problem with children being monitored at recess and that's the problem they're trying to fix, they could ask for some parent volunteers to come to the school and monitor recess. I know lots of moms that wouldn't mind coming up to the school and spending 30 min. standing around the playground and making sure everyone's engaged in "safe play".(lol) Or split the difference. If they get two 15min. breaks a day, have one of them be free time and the other a structured play time.

I live in one of the worst school districts in CA and people pull their kids out of school everyday to homeschool. I think it just depends on where you live. Sara had a great point, if you live in a good school district with good teachers and safe classrooms then you would probably leave your kids in school, but if you live in a school district where there are drugs, sex and violence then if you have the ability to remove your children you probably would. I don't think we should judge homeschooling parents or make stereotypes because everyone of them are different. :)

Tara - posted on 08/28/2010

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@Jodi A
You read right. What I feel is that in the 35 +hours a week at school, kids are being raised at school. When they spend that much time there you can not separate the two. Sure we all teach our children our own set of values and morals etc. but that is not all there is to raising a child. When they spend that much time influenced by and learning with kids all at relatively the same level of emotional intelligence they struggle more with using the morals that you have given them. Again, backing out of this one graciously, as this is an argument I don't feel I need to have. To each their own, and not everyone is suited to homeschooling just as not everyone is suited to formal schooling.
I personally wouldn't change a thing!

Tara - posted on 08/28/2010

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"tied to the apron strings forever, never exposed to the real world in anyway or group situations that aren't carefully monitored and controlled by mommy"
It's too bad that is your opinion of homeschoolers, my experience is the opposite.
Other than one person I have yet to meet a homeschooler who doesn't encourage independence in their children.
If you remember I have the free range kids, they are exposed to the real world in many ways, they are not tied to any apron strings, and they aren't monitored by me.
They are raised to be good citizens, because that is what they see and live every day. They are exposed to real life situations where real life solutions are required.
It is not a requirement of childhood to be bullied or to bully others, it is also not a requirement of childhood to spend 6-8 hours a day with a bunch of other kids, whose to say that spending that time with people of all ages isn't more conducive to the goal of creating empathetic and compassionate people?
6-7 hours a day, 5 days a week leaves 20 hours during the week day for your children to model your values and 35 hours a week for them to be exposed to every other kids values or lack of.
Everyone in our town knows my kids, because they are around all over the place all the time. They get the mail, they go to the library,they go to the store, they visit at the Senior center. They are all known as those "wonderful homeschooled kids".
Some hs'ers do so for religious reasons and often those are the ones when you hear about kids being sheltered or shut in etc.
Tara
I love & nurture my kids at home ~~ same place they learn academics is the same place they learn emotional intelligence.

Jodi - posted on 08/25/2010

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@ Tara, I am just curious about this comment you made: " I don't in fact believe in nor follow the idea of institutional schooling as the best model for raising my kids."

Schools are only there to educate. They are not there to raise our kids. As parents, we have hours outside school to be instilling our values and raising them the way we want to raise them. But going to school for 6-7 hours a day, 5 days a week isn't interfering with the raising of our children......it is nothing more than education and socialisation.

If I have read this wrong, then please feel free to clarify for me :)

Lyndsay - posted on 08/25/2010

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WRONG. With all of the kids diagnosed with ADHD and hyperactive/behavioural disorders, you'd think this would be a no brainer. These kids need time to burn off their energy, or the teachers' classrooms are going to be hell.

[deleted account]

Wrong. As others have said, kids need the break. The school I taught at was the best public school in the state. They were terrified of losing that status, and think that increasing and intensifying structured learning time will keep that from happening. Don't know where that thought comes from as it is proven that kids who get exercise and free time do better (as Carol pointed out). Lunch was 35 minutes. That included all 12 classes in the grade level going through the lunch line, eating, and going to the playground. Playground time was only about 5 minutes for the last class in the lunch line. The students did have 30 minutes of P.E. each day which is wonderful, but doesn't have the same effect as a true recess. Within the classroom, we did small reading groups and centers 3 out of 5 days. I think that helped as the students got a chance to be out of their seats and change activities every 20 minutes. On those days without centers, I made an effort to have an out of the seat learning game or stretch time. That helped too, but not the same as a true recess. Sometimes I felt guilty for the pressure put on these kids. But by the same token, the district and school is doing something right for them to be the best! I just think loosening up a little would do more good for the school (specifically the students), not harm. Sorry that turned into a personal rant.

Johnny - posted on 08/25/2010

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Children who receive more short breaks throughout the day, such as 2 15 minute recesses & a 40 minute lunch are shown to have better test scores and get higher grades compared to their peers in similar socio-economic schools which only have a lunch break.

It seems like common sense. I know that my work suffers by the end of the morning when I've been working for 4 1/2 hours without a break. I'd personally rather break up my breaks too (same time, more frequency). My productivity would increase.

[deleted account]

My daughter got a concussion at recess last year cuz a boy accidently ran into her and she fell down and hit her head on the concrete. Yeah, it sucked and was scary, but they are KIDS! Stuff happens. Should we ban running and playing from their lives completely? NO!

Better for kids to learn conflict resolution and such while they are IN school w/ at least some supervision available then after school running loose in the neighborhood.....

LaCi - posted on 08/25/2010

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Oh, well then I don't really care. Kindergarteners got extra recess time, but once we hit the first grade we just had the lunch hour. Given that hour and gym class I don't see a need for two 15 minute recess breaks.

Amie - posted on 08/25/2010

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Laci, This recess I think refers to the morning and afternoon recesses. Here, anyway, the kids get 15 minutes in the morning, the one hour lunch and 15 minutes in the afternoon.

LaCi - posted on 08/25/2010

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I've heard of schools canceling recess altogether, rather than replacing it with structured active time. As long as the kids are remaining active I don't see a huge problem with it. I think recess is great because it allows the kids to burn off the pent up energy they accumulate after being stuck at a desk for so long and it keeps them moving. I don't necessarily think it needs to be personal/unstructured time, just active time. That being said, 15 minutes? that's all the play time they get? We had an hour set aside for lunch/recess, as soon as you finished eating you were able to go burn off energy until the hour was up and there were always games to play if you wanted, kickball, dodgeball, basketball, and the playground was there if you weren't into the sporty games. I don't really see why anything is wrong with that. Teachers were patrolling the area, there weren't a lot of fights, not a lot of bullying. I guess I just don't really understand the problem with normal recess.

Amie - posted on 08/25/2010

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I don't see the benefit of this. I really don't.



Most previous posters have given good examples of why. It does teach them skills, that will they will hone and mature with time, it will benefit them as adults.



It is a much needed break the kids do need. Sure some places have issues with bullying, fighting, etc. My kids school is fairly on top of everything. There's always someone with a complaint though. At some point it does need to become not about what the school is doing and what the parents should be doing.



My kids are well prepared for school and all it entails. We've never really had to deal with the bullying issue since they were small. It wasn't at school either, it was in our own neighborhood from an older child. It was dealt with between that household and our own. The school did know about it because both of our children attend the same school but the school did not interfere because we asked them not too. There was no need, it could have made it worse in the long run if they had.



My son has broken his leg twice, at home. He could have just as easily done it when he was older at school. He slipped and landed on his leg wrong, that's all it took to give him a fracture.



I also remember being a kid and loving recess. Even during the bad years when I did have to deal with other little snots I wouldn't have given up recess. It was time away from studies and adults standing over you telling you what to do.



My kids are fairly active away from school. This year is going to be one of our busiest. We've chosen activities for them though that, while structured, they have to work to succeed. (ties into other comments about all kids being given trophies and "winning") I'll never understand this new fad of "not hurting a kid's feelings". I succeeded in my activities because I had to work for it. I practiced, I trained, I loved it. When I got my trophies, plaques and awards I knew I had earned them. When my kids come home with those participation awards, I tend to not focus on them and focus on the awards they got for the activities they earned an award for, no matter the placing (if it's 3rd or 1st). Which is why we picked the activities for them we did. They did have a say and we wouldn't force them to do something they didn't want but they wanted to do these. Our oldest is in her 2nd year of cadets now. In her first year she earned 3 promotions. She's heading into her 2nd year as a Leading Cadet. Our son is in his second year of Beaver Scouts, his is one of a few troops that implemented badges for the younger ones last year. Ever badge he has, he earned. Just like our daughter who is taking dance this year, she knows to succeed and be able to make it to competitions she will have to practice and put in the effort. Same with Mano-Mano that they are both taking this year, to succeed and earn their belts, they need to practice and work at it.



Ok this is long but in short, kids do need and benefit from structured time but they also need those unstructured times to enhance their people skills, to learn how to deal in the real world. Everything starts when we are kids and matures along with us as we grow.

Tah - posted on 08/25/2010

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now school is a prison yard...and our children are what....convicts...well then..now im scared my 8 year old will get shanked while playing hopscotch...so now im all for it...

Jenny - posted on 08/25/2010

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My daughter's school is K-6 and there is no seperation of grades during recess. I don't really care though. I've never been a fan of segregation. I think it's great to let them run around and blow off some steam and hang out with their friends. My daughter started an animal helper club and during breaks they plan their club. She has most of her class signed up and they all wear badges if they're in the club. Sure, some kids get bullied and don't enjoy recess but that i show lfie is too and I don't beleive in molly coddling children. It doesn't do them any favours in the long run.

[deleted account]

I'm all for unstructured time. Sure, kids will get made fun of, bullied, feel left out, etc, etc, etc, but it teaches them. They learn from it. Maybe they learn how to handle bullies. Maybe they learn how to be more outgoing. The point is, they LEARN from it.

I live in Ontario. My sister went to middle school here. 1. I don't remember ANYTHING about a blow job coalition and 2. she was never with the 13 yr. olds until she was within the age bracket. When a child has been bullied at school, the parents don't scream about the supervision. Most of the good parents teach their children how to handle the problem. So you see, children aren't all by themselves in this great world. Schools educate in scholastics and parents educate in emotion and logic.

Amanda - posted on 08/25/2010

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Ontario Canada or Cali. Because in Ontario canada 5 year old DO NOT spend time with 13 year olds on the school yard. There are areas for Jr Kd - Sr Kj, and then Grade one - grade 4, Grade 5- Grade 8. Children only mix together before school starts, when its a parents job to watch their children.

Girls giving blowjobs at school has nothing to do with the school, it has to do with the parents. It is not the schools job to hover over every 10-14 year old like a naggy mother.

Recess teachs children, to stand up for themselves, to mingle, to learn how to make new friends, instead of having friends froced apon them. It teachs them leadership, and submission. All important parts of healthy adult life.

Sarah - posted on 08/25/2010

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I would echo everything Sharon said for start!
Plus, I think that *some* kids today have far too much structure in their lives. They do a million after school clubs etc etc. Training to be the next ballet dancer/piano genius/karate expert/gymnast. I think that having playtime during the school day is probably a relief for them!! Also, it gives kids a chance to make up their own games and ideas.

Also like Sharon said, different age groups usually have different areas for playtime, or different times. Tara said she wanted her kids to learn how to deal with all people regardless of age, well being in a playground where the age is to some extent mixed would be a good start to that.

I just think to take away the few times a day where kids can do what they want to do, is cruel. As Lindsay said, we'd all be up in arms if OUR breaks at work were replaced by "structured" activities! Sod that! I want my coffee and a cigarette.....not some god awful activity decided by my bosses! :)

Johnny - posted on 08/25/2010

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I've got to agree with the majority of posters on this thread. I really think that recess is an important part of the day. It gives kids brains a break from structured activities and allows more creativity and independent thought. They need to figure out for themselves what they are going to do with their time. There is (as has been posted) a great deal of research that suggests the importance of unstructured time for kids. Always having someone telling you what you are going to be doing and how you are going to do it does not allow the development of some of the skills necessary for metacognition, you can't learn to think for yourself if someone is always telling you how to do it.

As a kid, there were years when I didn't like recess so much. I was bullied. And learning to deal with it and overcome it has been enormously useful in my life. Recess may not seem to directly offer any specific skills, but there are things that children are learning in that setting that will serve them very well throughout their life and that can not be duplicated in a classroom. As someone who is currently being bullied in the workplace, I can tell you that the lessons I learned from dealing with it as a child are serving me well now.

Tara - posted on 08/25/2010

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I should add that I have a lot of issues with school in general so I should probably opt out of this convo altogether, since it will become increasingly harder to support structured recess when I don't in fact believe in nor follow the idea of institutional schooling as the best model for raising my kids.
I've done both, had my oldest two in school for a few years, realized that they could learn so much more, so much more in a more nurturing respectful way.
So have it, I'm off my soapbox on this one.
:)Tara

Tara - posted on 08/25/2010

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I would bet if it were an option, kids could still have recess but those who didn't want to be in the yard with the rest of them could take part in something more interesting like drama workshops, yoga for kids, painting, music jams, dance etc. you would see a lot of kids go.
Some kids don't have the resources to take part in those things outside of school.
Many children think that recess is anything but relaxing. A lot of children spend their free time avoiding situations that threaten them. And a few years back here in good old Ontario there was an epidemic of girls as young as 11 "servicing" older boys in the school yard, behind dumpsters, in the bushes etc. these were not girls in relationships, this was a line of boys being pleasured by girls.
And the argument that children need to learn how to deal with the typical school yard stuff is wacked. There is no where in society that mimics a school yard. There are not enough teachers to supervise the number of students. Kids as young as 5 are thrown in with kids who are 13. The language, the inappropriate conversations etc. are all unnecessary for a childs well being. Children need to learn their problem solving skills from people who know how to problem solve not from children who are in the same or close to the same stage of emotional intelligence are not the best example for kids.
Supervised free time allows children to learn how to deal with all kinds of situations, but learns how to do it in way that is going to actually assist them with real life scenarios.
There are many reasons I homeschool, one of them is that I want my kids to learn how to deal with all people regardless of age.I want them to learn to be peaceful problems solvers, confident in their abilities to speak their mind, but articulate and respectful enough to do it in a way that treats everyone fairly.
They are learning emotional intelligence along with their academic and social learning.
I will re- reply with I think it should be optional, and then see how many kids actually participate, ask those who do why they did and ask those who didn't why they chose to opt out. Then follow those kids for the next 15 years and see how they are all doing then.
Tara

[deleted account]

This is totally wrong... of course recess have fights, children being left out and all... It's always been that way and always will... It's part of life. Structured activities??? Well for fuck's sake let's make the kids even more like robots and prevent them from being creative and free-spirited. Just create a hardcore mold that we can all get our society to follow from kindergarten. Holy shit, if my kid went to that school, I would be raising bloody hell. I bet most of the people who decided to do this don't even have children... I'm enraged.

Lindsay - posted on 08/25/2010

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Tara, I think your view of recess may be slightly off. There are not hundreds of kids out with no supervision. Typically, it's a class or even a few out whenever the particular teacher works it out in the schedule of the day. The teachers are out there watching their students. It's just that the kids get 15 minutes of free time on the playground to go swing, slide, climb the monkey bars, run around or do whatever they want.

I personally think this is a horrible idea. Free time is when kids are able to form friendships. Some of the most important lessons and skills kids can develop are learned during recess. We'd all be screaming if adults were denied a break during their day. Why not have the same respect for our children?

Sarah - posted on 08/25/2010

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Really? No playtime (as we call recess) ?
Jeez, that just seems insane to me!
I don't know about schools elsewhere, but when I was at school, there WAS supervision. Ok, there wasn't loads of teachers around, but there was 3 or 4 stood at either end of the playground keeping an eye out. At dinnertime there was also dinner ladies around too.

Yes, kids can still manage to get into mischief or get hurt or bullied. I just don't see the point in ruining it for everyone "just in case". We're so concerned these days with kids being "protected" from everything, you CAN'T protect from everything, and if you did manage it, those kids would be in for a BIG shock later on in life!

Jodi - posted on 08/25/2010

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Some more resources on this issue.



But Tara, I will never agree with you. Maybe people just need to stop blaming and suing schools and understand that kids get hurt sometimes and it isn't anyone's "fault". Amazingly, neither of my children have yet been hurt in a school yard, not seriously. But they have had small altercations with school friends, and have managed to learn to sort it out for themselves, and they are both extremely happy.



http://www.kidsource.com/kidsource/conte...

Amanda - posted on 08/25/2010

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Unstructured play is the MOST important part of a childs mental emontional and physical development.



Structured activities actually disable, and debilitate childrens ability to function in the real world. Child whos whole lives are planned out for them, and micro managed for them, tend to have higher levels of depression and drop out rates in College. They also are less creative, and only know how to follow rules, because they missed the most important part of childhood, learning how to make ones own rules.



Seriously blowjobs behide the school? If your child is giving blow jobs in middle school, or younger (since Highschool doesnt have recess), you have bigger issues then worring about unstructured play time for your little darling. LOL

Jodi - posted on 08/25/2010

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And I don't think you can compare a school playground to a prison.

And your daughter could be having oral sex with her boyfriend under the window of her bedroom at night, you may not know that either. If she's going to do it, she's going to do it. There's better ways of discouraging the behaviour than banning unstructured time.

Jodi - posted on 08/25/2010

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The American Academy of Pediatrics is concerned about the lack of unstructured play in a child's day, and research has shown it contributes to a child's stress levels. Unstructured play also allows children time to adjust to a school setting, make friends, use their own creativity, practice their social skills, and solve problems. The study has shown that children who participate in unstructured play will become more resilient.



http://www.aap.org/pressroom/playFINAL.p...



I agree that children may be subject to injury or bullying, but that is also a part of life. Children need to learn how to manage these issues too, and it is only by experiencing them that they can learn from them, as well as their own mistakes. Sure, the school is responsible, but my kids could just as easily break a leg in my back yard doing something stupid - I don't supervise them 100% every moment of the day.



That unstructured play in the middle of a school day allows kids to relax, unwind and be themselves. In the long term, it will benefit them in their busy day.



Do you like to work all day, only with structured activities with no break to even grab a coffee and chat to a colleague? A 15 minute downtime break?

Tara - posted on 08/25/2010

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I can see their point. As a homeshooling parent I understand why they want to do away with the unstructured time that recess allows. To place hundreds of school children essentially alone on a school yard for even 15 minutes invites all kinds of possible negative outcomes. If you are going to send your children to school then the school is responsible for your child throughout the day.
If at recess your daughter is caught giving oral sex to a boy behind a dumpster, then most parents would cry "where's the supervision? How did this happen at school?"
If your child were beaten to crap by a group of bullies you would cry "where is the supervision??"
Teachers can not be everywhere during recess or lunch. I think it is better to have structured time that is supervised so that these kids are not left to their own devices.
Organized activities such as sports or reading, or games etc. are far better than sending them all out to the "yard" . Prisoners are allowed in the "yard" for set amounts of time every day, what often happens? Fights, stabbings, unwanted advances etc.
If you are a parent who disagrees with this what is your reasoning?

Jessica - posted on 08/24/2010

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lol Joce, weren't we just talking about this kind of shit earlier today in my backyard? Heaven forbid kids be aloud to just be crazy little, imaginative, worm eating, mud pie making little monsters and love their childhoods anymore.

C. - posted on 08/24/2010

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Quoting Jodi: "Wrong. Kids do need unstructured play. All those reasons they cited "unstructured recess can lead to fights, injuries, or some children feeling left out." are an important part of our development and preparation for later life. But hey, let's not hurt anyone's feelings, because life is always going to treat them well - what do they need to toughen up for?"

100% Perfect.

Jocelyn - posted on 08/24/2010

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*head-desk*
OMFG, they are kids. CHILDREN. Children need to be able to play how THEY want to. It's only 15 minutes to begin with! I seriously wish that everyone would stop trying to bubble wrap our kids into believing that the world is their fucking oyster and nothing ever goes wrong, and everyone is always treated the same. Cutting recess because "unstructured recess can lead to fights, injuries, or some children feeling left out." Well that goes right along with giving the losers trophies. Bull.

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