School fund raiser?

[deleted account] ( 16 moms have responded )

I heard this while listening to the radio at work tonight. I don't think it's a good idea but I'm wondering what others think of it. I didn't catch the name or location of the school where they were trying this new fund raiser.

There's a school that's raising funds by awarding marks on tests. The more money you bring in, the better your grade. Example: you bring in $20, that's good for 10 points on 2 different tests. In some cases that could mean the difference between a failing grade and a passing one.

While I'm sure the school will raise a lot of money this way, I don't think it's an honest way to get a grade. What incentive is there for kids to study and earn their grades? Because some kid is rich, does that mean he can buy 100% on all his tests? And what does that mean for the poor kid? Is it fair for one to study their butt off and earn their grades while another is buy himself straight A's?

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Jenny - posted on 11/12/2009

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A millions times NO. I have not heard of this so am going on face value but I would freak out if this was considered at my daughter's school. Grades are for earning academically, not for fundraising.

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[deleted account]

I think that if a parent wishes to reward their child with a monetary reward for good grades is between the home, and should never be brought to the school level. JMO though. Kids work for food rewards that are far cheaper than paying for a good grade, which is an expectation to do well in school. School wide food incentives can easily be pizza parties, popcorn parites, ice cream parties, root beer float parties, or even a non-food incentive like showing a school wide movie for good grades.

JL - posted on 11/14/2009

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Laura, I do the same thing. I sponsor my daughter for grades. However, she is only in first grade so we just do 5 dollars for each A she gets and 3 for each B. She gets only 5 graded sections. So if she gets all A's she gets 25 dollars. Which so far that is what she has gotten because she has had straight A's.

Isobel - posted on 11/13/2009

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Is this really how it happens...cause I could see it going another way. Perhaps somebody sponsors them for getting certain grades?

Here, we sponsor kids for certain events , like the Terry Fox Run (for cancer), where they get more money, depending how many laps they run. Is it possible that the true mission of this program is to encourage them to get better grades in order to bring in more donations... It just seems a little more rational to me.

(I sponsor you $5.00 if you get a C, $10.00 if you get a B, $20.00 if you get an A)

Jodi - posted on 11/13/2009

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I just don't understand why they can't do the standard school fundraisers, like raffles, fetes, Fathers Day, Mothers Day and Christmas stalls, walkathons, trivia nights, Scholastic book fairs, and so on. There are so many things that can be done, I just don't get the logic in something so ridiculously, morally wrong.

[deleted account]

Quoting Traci:

Bad idea. What brainiac thought of that???



The News & Observer of Raleigh reported Wednesday that a parent advisory council at Rosewood Middle School in Goldsboro come up with the fundraising plan after last year's chocolate sale flopped.



What a disgusting idea and I hope this "parent advisory council" gets dismissed along with the principal who apparently approved of the fundraiser. 



I run the fundraisers for our National Jr. Honor Society and proudly say we run legit fundraisers that don't cheat a child's education or tamper or bribe test scores.

JL - posted on 11/13/2009

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Crappy idea and I personally would not let my child participate in something like this and I am glad they stopped the "fund raising."



When my daughters school needs items they send out letters asking for parents to donate those items. Most of the parents I know donate those items in a heart beat. I have already this school year sent in 3 different bags full of items and 3 boxes full of reams of copy paper for the office. Each parent in my daughters class has signed up to bring snacks for the class on certain days of the week to aleviate the financial burden that has been placed on the teachers because of budget cuts. When they need funding they do actual fund raising events like they have family Spaghetti nights, family movie nights, they sell items at the school store, and they have popcorn fridays.



They also encourage the box tops program to help with funding and work with scholastic to have book fairs to help earn books for the library. There are so many more constructive ways to earn needed funding...this just seemed like a lazy and easy way to get it done and what does that teach kids.

[deleted account]

Quoting Amie:

GOLDSBORO, N.C. - A middle school in North Carolina is selling test scores to students in a bid to raise money.

The News & Observer of Raleigh reported Wednesday that a parent advisory council at Rosewood Middle School in Goldsboro come up with the fundraising plan after last year's chocolate sale flopped.

The school will sell 20 test points to students for $20.
Story continues below ↓advertisement | your ad here

Students can add 10 extra points to each of two tests of their choice. The extra points could take a student from a "B" to an "A" on those tests or from a failing grade to a passing grade.

Principal Susie Shepherd says it's not enough of an impact to change a student's overall grades.

It's wrong to think that "one particular grade could change the entire focus of nine weeks," Shepherd told the News Observer newspaper.

Wrong lesson?
Education officials were not as sanguine about the grades-for-cash exchange, telling the paper it taught the wrong lessons.

"If a student in college were to approach a professor to buy a grade, we would be frowning on that," said Rebecca Garland, chief academic officer for the Department of Public Instruction. "It might even be a reason for dismissal. We're teaching kids something that if they were to do it later, they could get in trouble for."

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/33854822/ns/...

Even if it's only for the duration of the fundraiser it is still wrong and still sending the wrong message to the kids.



Thanks for posting the whole story.  Like I said, I only heard a blurb on the radio while working.  I still think it sends the wrong message even if it's only for a short time.

ME - posted on 11/13/2009

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This is horrifying!!! I have, and continue to, offer extra credit assignments to my students, but they are NOT easy, and the 20 pts. I offer will not raise a failing grade to a passing one.

Jodi - posted on 11/12/2009

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Its disgraceful. It is not teaching children that in order to get by in life and succeed, you need to use your own skills and merits, but rather, that as long as they have money they can get waht they want. What a horrible thing to teach children. There are hundreds of better ways to fundraise, just the way every other school does!

Krista - posted on 11/12/2009

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Thanks, Amie, I just read your post which explains a little more. I can see how parents might think this would be motivational for their kids, but I still can't believe that teachers, and the principal (?!?!) would agree to it!

Krista - posted on 11/12/2009

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That is a horrible idea! There are thousands of valid ways to raise funds at a school...what kind of idiot came up with this idea? A student's grades should reflect what they know, not how much they can raise. Every student's grades in that school would be invalid as they would not be a true representation of the child's achievement. Why even bother with grades if they are going to skewed like that?

Amie - posted on 11/12/2009

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GOLDSBORO, N.C. - A middle school in North Carolina is selling test scores to students in a bid to raise money.

The News & Observer of Raleigh reported Wednesday that a parent advisory council at Rosewood Middle School in Goldsboro come up with the fundraising plan after last year's chocolate sale flopped.

The school will sell 20 test points to students for $20.
Story continues below ↓advertisement | your ad here

Students can add 10 extra points to each of two tests of their choice. The extra points could take a student from a "B" to an "A" on those tests or from a failing grade to a passing grade.

Principal Susie Shepherd says it's not enough of an impact to change a student's overall grades.

It's wrong to think that "one particular grade could change the entire focus of nine weeks," Shepherd told the News Observer newspaper.

Wrong lesson?
Education officials were not as sanguine about the grades-for-cash exchange, telling the paper it taught the wrong lessons.

"If a student in college were to approach a professor to buy a grade, we would be frowning on that," said Rebecca Garland, chief academic officer for the Department of Public Instruction. "It might even be a reason for dismissal. We're teaching kids something that if they were to do it later, they could get in trouble for."

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/33854822/ns/...

Even if it's only for the duration of the fundraiser it is still wrong and still sending the wrong message to the kids.

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