School suspension over haircut?!

Jodi - posted on 05/17/2012 ( 20 moms have responded )

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http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/nba-ball-d...

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Shaving a picture of Matt Bonner in his head could net a young Spurs fan an in-school suspension

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.By Kelly Dwyer | Ball Don't Lie – 11 hours ago.. .
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A young San Antonio Spurs fan faces an in-school suspension on Thursday if he doesn't somehow find a way to alter the image of Matt Bonner that was shaved into the back of his head. You read the previous sentence correctly. The Spurs forward, who is averaging just 14.6 minutes per game in the postseason, has apparently made such an impact on Woodlake Hills Middle School student Patrick Gonzalez that the youngster decided to have a hairstylist shave an image of the Spurs sharpshooter into the back of his haircut. Via Tas Melas, here's the image that has the principals at Woodlake Hills Middle School in righteous fear of the apparently inevitable anarchy and lawlessness in the school halls that will result if Gonzalez comes to school on Thursday without changing the haircut:

The offending haircut (Courtesy twitter.com/Grace__White)

Because the image is so threatening, and so severe, if the style isn't "fixed" by Thursday, Gonzalez will have to take in an in-school suspension (the worst of all suspensions, because you don't get to go home and watch TV), because that seems very rational and fair to all the children. Here's the story, from Grace White at FOX 29:




"There was no permission that was given if the parent thought that then it was a miscommunication," said Aubrey Chancellor, Judson I.S.D. District officials say the haircut is a distraction. "Whether it's the spurs or whether it's the cowboys anything people obviously support, it doesn't matter."

You hear that, Texas schoolchildren? Whether you support spurs or cowboys or even Spurs or Cowboys (two teams that obviously play against each other several times a year for the World Finals of Stanley Bowls), shaving a rather benign image of a fan friendly forward that wears New Balance sneakers during pro basketball games seems like the least offensive infraction we can possibly imagine.

Especially when the hero in question was an Academic All-American at college, one who "never received less than an 'A' as final grade in any class throughout his academic career, until he received a 'C' on a chemistry exam in college, which led to a final grade of a 'B.'"

(No word on if Bonner's 'C' and 'B' marks were unduly influenced by a classmate featuring an image of Sam Perkins shaved into his head.)

We don't know the entirety of this story, or Gonzalez's history. Perhaps he was caught selling three-pointers in the parking lot outside of the school last month. Maybe he was previously suspended for telling a teacher to "square your feet" and "get your elbow under the chalk" as she attempted to teach her class. It's possible that he served a detention earlier in the year for drawing a three-point arc on the inside of a textbook.

Still, unless this youngster has some history that led to a reaction like this, the threat of a suspension for an innocuous haircut like this can only be termed an "overreaction.""




This is MY favorite part: "There was no permission that was given if the parent thought that then it was a miscommunication," said Aubrey Chancellor, Judson I.S.D." Since when do I have to have PERMISSION to cut my child's hair?! Oh my lordy! Should schools be able to dictate how you cut your child's hair?

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Jodi - posted on 05/17/2012

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My kids schools' have hair policy. And as parents, we know that policy when we apply to the school. I see nothing wrong with a school having certain standards, as long as they are clear and up front. In this situation, it depends on whether the school has a policy that it made clear to students or not.

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Jodi - posted on 05/18/2012

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Hair "graffitti"?!?!?!?! Om my lordy, that is *the* best term for unusual shave jobs I have EVER heard! lol Around here, football players all have their hair shaved in some aweful, ugly pattern for the homecoming game. A whole week or more of funny, ugly hair. It's a bonding thing or something for the players, it's just hilarious for the rest of us!

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 05/18/2012

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Many of the public schools here have somewhat of a dresscode. It isn't anything serious but a few schools, including my daughters, have just banned the tight leggings and yoga pants. The kids are wearing them and rolling them down until you can see their butt cracks. So, the schools said, "no more". As for hair though, there isn't any code for that. They can have all different colours and styles, icluding mohawks and fro's. LOL



ETA:

Also the girls must have their shorts and skirts the length of where the tip of their middle finger falls when at their side. They cannot have their boobs popping out and they cannot wear spaghetti strap style shirts.

Corinne - posted on 05/18/2012

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We too have strict dress codes that include hair. There was a boy in my class (17yrs ago) who had the Nike tick shaved into the back of his head, he was suspended until it had grown out. Hair graffitti and wild colours will earn you a suspension, having your skirt too short or wearing excessive makeup will get you a detention. When I was at school, we couldn't even have brand names on our coats and bags!
If you sign your kid up to a school, you should follow the school rules - end of. Like Tracey said, have his hairdo in the school holidays.

Tracey - posted on 05/18/2012

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All the schools around here have a strict dress code including hair that is similar to Jodi's. If this boy came to my kid's schools he would receive the same sanction or worse.

If it is a school rule to have hair is a certain way, tough - you do it or have this haircut during the holidays and change it before going back to school. You can't choose which rules to obey and which to ignore.

Jodi - posted on 05/17/2012

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After reading that, I guess you could call it extreme and distracting.

For me personally, I hold my children to certain standards, and I expect my children's school (if we send themt os chool, I would really love to homeschool) to trust my decision on what's best for my child. But, I don't think I really have to worry about that around here. I probably broke every rule they had in that handbook on dressing when I was in highschool! ;) I turned out just fine! lmbo

Jodi - posted on 05/17/2012

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Around here, dress codes are pretty lenient I guess. I have never even heard of hair having any special rules. Dress code includes length of shorts (varies from school to school, but they can get pretty short) amount of cleavage showed and vulgarity on shrits or pants. I've never heard of rules against jewlery, piercings or tattoos either.

I have also had to work in places with dress codes and never heard of not being allowed to have such and such a hairdo. In food service places, long hair has to be tied back, facial hair (and sometimes the hair on your head) must be netted. Piercings usually have to taken out for shifts. There is a lawyer in the neighboring town with visible tattoos and long hair, he's really good and does great business. My doctor has her nose pierced and a tattoo of a dove between her thumb and finger. etc etc etc. Things must be very different in Australia. lol

Jodi - posted on 05/17/2012

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It is more a "dress code" which includes things like hair, dress, jewellery, etc. It isn't specifically only hair. I don't send my kids there because of the dress code, but I am happy to comply with it. MOST schools here in Australia have a dress code, some stricter than others. It is about how they want their students representing them. It's like choosing to work in a career or workplace that has a dress code or uniform. Many also would have pretty strict policies about your hair, your piercings, your tattoos, etc. It's just another fact of life. If a policy doesn't specifically state you CAN have a particular hairdo and it is a bit on the unusual side, you need to use your common sense.

Jodi - posted on 05/17/2012

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I have to admit, I would be a bit miffed if my school had a "hair-code", probably would try to not send my kids there. It seems a bit extreme to me. BUT, if the school has one, and if this haircut is in CLEAR violoation of that rule, then I get it. But, a school official was quoted saying "There was no permission that was given if the parent thought that then it was a miscommunication." If parents have to ask permission to get a haircut, then the rule is NOT clear enough and this "case" if you will, should be ruled in their favor.

Jodi - posted on 05/17/2012

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For boys, hair may be no shorter than a "number 2" and no longer than your collar. You can't have it coloured, it must be neat and tidy, etc. Girls must have their hair tied back if they choose to keep it long. Basically, it is a very conservative policy and I have no issue with it. I can't recall the exact wording and don't have a copy handy right now. But I would expect a student with a hair cut like that from one of my kids' schools to be sent home to have the hair situation rectified before they can return to the school. Remember, my kids aren't in public school, but I do know there are public schools here who have similar policies (and others that don't). It is really up to the school to set its own policies, and as long as the parents are aware of it, I don't see the issue.

Personally, I see nothing offensive about this particular hair cut, but it would be terribly distracting. If it is against school policy, then you pretty much have to suck it up.

Jodi - posted on 05/17/2012

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Jodi, I am genuinely curious as to the hair policy. Could you give us examples of things NOT allowed? All that comes to mind would be afros (could be a visual obstruction to children seated behind that child) or mohawks for the same reason.

Jodi - posted on 05/17/2012

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I could understand if it were a swastika, or something truly offensive...but this? Come on!

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no, schools should not have anything to do with kids' hair. it's a matter of self-expression, and this school is trying to squash that, one of the most important things a kid needs to learn before they get older and get squashed by the workplace. this is bull crap.

Katherine - posted on 05/17/2012

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I think the hair curt is AWESOME! So artistic. Suspending him is ridiculous and like Jodi said, I would be having a shit fit too! Since when does a school decide? I know it's Texas, which does say a lot, but for them to suspend him is against his rights IMO.

Jodi - posted on 05/17/2012

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I dont' really care where it is! lol (although Texas is about as good an excuse as any I suppose! lol) If this were my kid, I would be throwing the biggest shit fit that school's ever seen. If they want to make a big deal out of a *haircut* for goodness sake...well...we'll have a BIG deal then! My lanta...it's HAIR! I was just flabbergasted by this!

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 05/17/2012

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Man, I think that is an AWESOME hair cut! Not that I support any teams or players but what a great job the stylist did.



Sorry but I don't think a school, especially public has any say on how a parent allows a child to cut their hair. It's HAIR! Gracious me, don't they have so many better things to worry about? So, they're worried other kids that cheer for a different team or player may get upset. Well, I fail to see how a haircut will cause an issue there. I mean, what if the kid had a picture of the player and posted it on his locker or walked around with it or had it put onto his shirt? Or what if all he did was talk about his favorite player and didn't have a pic at all?



I dunno, this is just silly, to me.

Jodi - posted on 05/17/2012

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The link has the picture, and you will see that it's not in the least offensive. At least, I don't think it is!

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