Sleeping in their own bed.

Sarah - posted on 07/22/2011 ( 112 moms have responded )

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I know we have a few attachment parents here, so I was wondering what you all do if your 6yr old was still wanting to sleep in the same bed as you.

This is how Jo Frost aka "SuperNanny" would deal with it : http://www.channel4.com/programmes/jo-fr...

Would that fit in your attachment parenting principles? Or would you just continue to let your child sleep in your bed until they were ready to go into their own bed?
How many sleepless nights would it take for you to use a method like Jo Frost's?

It's not a problem I have, I've never bed shared (unless they're ill) but I'm interested to see what attachment parents would do in this situation.

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Merry - posted on 07/24/2011

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I always liked super nanny, we watched her before we had Eric and we thought she was brilliant because in the end she had happy kids who weren't acting out.
When I had Eric I began seeing her treatment of the younger ones as mean. I couldn't imagine treating Eric like that. (forced weaning, refusing to pick up, abandonment method of sleep training.) at that point I thought her methods were only ok with children 3yrs or older because she seemed to nt understand young ones have strong emotional needs.
Jo doesn't seem to understand emotional needs.
I have used her time out method a few times when Eric purposefully disobeys me. And it's been quite effective. (he only needed replacing a few times anyways)
But as time goes on I just don't like the idea of training my kids like dogs. Ya now? I justdont want to make them obey cuz I said so.
I mean I want them to know my word is to be obeyed, but they are always able to talk and discuss and ask questions.

So, if Fia was still in bed with us at 6 would do this?
No.
She won't be with us at 6 because when I get pregnant again I will transition her out of our bed, hopefully into erics bed so they can bed share.

At 6 I would want to ask why shesin our bed, why she doesn't like her bed, when does she think she will go into her bed, what can we do to make her bed a good place to sleep.
On and on, I'd figure out by talking what's wrong and how we can fix it.
I don't agree with ignoring emotions.

Kylie - posted on 07/23/2011

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I think Jo Frost is mean when it comes to sleep and weaning. I dont like the quick fix, ignoring techniques, "it's not asssseptable" BS. You can't allow something to go for six years and then retrain the child in a weekend in front of cameras. It's unfair.

I love co sleeping, but when the kids get bigger they have the option to sleep in their own rooms. I dont like sleeping with my 6 year old, as she takes up too much room. So if i were in the position of having to transition her to her own bed I'd do it gently, and do my best to make it a positive thing and make it as easy for her as possible. If changes need to be made in a family dynamic, there should be a flow to it to give time for everyone in the family to adjust. Breaking a kid down by ignoring them and leaving them to scream themselves to sleep is not something that i could ever do.

Minnie - posted on 07/23/2011

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I don't think it's wrong for children to sleep separately from their parents. Not at all. I'm not sure why I have to keep explaining myself...maybe I'm not doing a very good job...

I'm simply saying it's not wrong for children to sleep with their parents either. No one is saying that parents who prefer to have their own bed don't love their children.

Again- the question was directed to AP parents. It was about whether WE agree with the methods. And we don't. Not that our way is the only way, we just wouldn't do what Jo Frost does. Because we're AP and Jo Frost's techniques and philosophy doesn't fit within the spectrum of AP.

Amie - posted on 07/23/2011

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Cathy, I never said it was the only way. If you read my PP you'll see that. I even suggest never starting for families that get to this point. The problem isn't the children, it's the parents. They do things without knowing what it all entails and then turn around and end up punishing their children for their own mistakes. That's hardly fair.

No family has complained of a lack of sleep. If a lack of sleep is the problem, then obviously something needs to be done. That is never what I or anyone against this has said.

The problem is the method. You don't need to break your child to find a solution. Which is what the "ripe a band aid" off method does. You are breaking your child, you are not preparing them properly, you are just doing something to them which they most likely don't fully understand. Even 6 yr old need a bit more time and adjustment than an explanation that "this is how it is now and you will do it". That's not any kind of philosophy I can agree with. I am my childrens parent, I am not their dictator.

Minnie - posted on 07/22/2011

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Meh. I think she's full of hot air, bells and whistles. Exactly what people want to pay to see. The OP was about AP parents and their thoughts of her techniques. AP parents generally don't seek stark black and white quick fixes to issues because usually they understand that their children have certain needs and capabilities ad choose to foster a strong bond of trust and acceptance. Punishment doesn't have a place within AP. An AP parent generally wouldn't turn to TV to 'fix' her 14 month old nursling or bedsharing tots.



There is NOTHING about Supernanny that fits within a slice of what it means to be an attachment parent. Completely different perspectives.

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Traci - posted on 05/03/2013

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Help new mom...my 2 1/2 yr old has to sleep with me and my husband, and its getting a bit cramped..legs and hand everywhere. How do I get her in her own bed???

Dolly - posted on 08/27/2011

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I have allowed my children to sleep with me until they are secure enough to sleep on there own.

My 10 year old 2 weeks ago came up to me

and said I'm very sorry I can't sleep with you any longer I need my space.

So cute !

Meg - posted on 08/24/2011

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I figure that if my son is ready to sleep in his own bed he will, He's 5 now, and sometimes crashes wherever he is.

I would NEVER use any of the ideas Jo Frost suggests. NEVER EVER. Her ideals are at complete odds with attachment theory and practice.

I figure, if he's still sleeping in our bed when he gets his first girlfriend we'll just have to get a bigger bed! jk ;-)

LadyJane - posted on 08/07/2011

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While I'm about a week or so late for this thread, it seems that what people don't get about that SuperNanny show was that it was fake for the most part. She actually admitted it on a news show. The children were asked to act horribly while she then proceeded to give advice that would probably work in those situations. Sometimes those will work, and sometimes they won't. To me it was pure entertainment, none of her methods worked with my son. NOt a single one. He was having none of that. We had to use a whole different method than what she had advised.

As for Co-Sleeping, My son decided when it was the right time to sleep in his own bed. Now the only time he sleeps with me is when I go to be early and he wants a story. No big deal for me. My daughter never liked sleeping in her bed until she was 9 years old, then she would once a week sleep in her own room. At 11 years old, she totally wanted to sleep in her own bed... I see nothing wrong with it at all. When I was in my late 20s we went to Florida and stayed in a neighbors camper. I slept with my mom, my brothers slept on the other side. There was no issue with ir or anything... I do believe it's just something some parents do. Either they co-sleep or they don't, but no one has the right to say that one is heathier than the other or that one is wrong over teh other. It is just a matter of personal preference.

Minnie - posted on 07/27/2011

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No, I don't think it's old. It was just within the context of what we were talking about previously, re: independence vs. dependence and cosleeping.

My position: cosleeping is not a factor in a person growing up independent in personality or not.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/27/2011

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Emma, I am trying so hard to not have her in my bed anymore. I don't mind the occasional like you, but I need a good night sleep too!

[deleted account]

It's strange my kids have all been sleeping in their own beds for the last week. 'Touch wood' i hope it lasts. The one plus with my kids and them coming into muy bed is i only have one per night and because i'm single it's not an issue to share.

Stifler's - posted on 07/27/2011

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That is exactly what I"m like Marina. I don't mind the kids coming in but I refuse to have them in our bed every night and go to sleep in there. Logan has come in the last 2 nights for the first time in his life and I've had the worst sleep ever because he is constantly rolling around and kicking me.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/27/2011

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WOW! I had no intention of getting you so defensive. I just felt it was an unfair blanket statement to make. It made it sound like "you just cannot understand until you have been doing it since birth" and I have, and I still don't feel the same way. I was not arguing to argue, I was debating your statement.

Jenn - posted on 07/27/2011

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Fine, I retract my blanket statement. Happy now? I think you like to argue for the sake of arguing and it is rather exhausting. Good luck with the weaning and transition to all-night crib sleeping.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/27/2011

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So for you to claim that everyone that has bed shared since birth feels differently than those parents that don't ever bed share is just way to much a blanket statement. Sorry, but not everyone that bed shares does it cause they love it, or that they will even continue with doing it.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/27/2011

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Yeah Jenn, I can admit when I am wrong about something.....some people can't. I never thought I was truly bed sharing. She is 15 months, not 6. I am in the process of squashing it, and have been in the process for a while now. No I don't truly care for it. I do not get enough sleep, and my back hurts in the morning.

I have already said this in this thread somewhere, but the occassional hop into bed I am having a nightmare is fine for me. It is the idea that mine and my husbands bed is open every single night, and having the kids actually go to bed in our bed I don't like. My son maybe every other month ends up in our bed for a night....no biggy. Or I walk him back to his room, and lie down in there with him.

Karla - posted on 07/26/2011

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@ Laura, Yeah, I do think that was mentioned here and there. But then the OP asked what those practicing attachment parenting would do if their 6 y.o. was still wanting to sleep in the same bed. So the issue of what the parents wanted got blurred.

Isobel - posted on 07/26/2011

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ok, I only read the first and the last page of this debate, but has it occurred to anybody yet that Jo Frost was giving advice to parents who didn't WANT to co-sleep anymore...co-sleeping wasn't working for them anymore and wanted advice on how to ween their children from it?

Therefore, her advice (which worked WONDERFULLY for me, thank you very much) was not intended as a judgement against co-sleeping in general, but advice on how to end it when you decide it's not working for your family anymore.

Jenn - posted on 07/26/2011

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Now that is really interesting because the entire time this discussion has taken place on this thread, you continually asked why parents co-slept. You have been doing it for 15 months?? That is a long time to be doing something you do not like doing. However, you are doing it for the very same reason I started to co-sleep. So I could get sleep as I night nursed instead of trudging back and forth to beds. It was never my intention to co-sleep. I just was nursing baby 1 when I got pregnant and very sick with baby 2. Then we just kind of all ended up in one big family bed. You may not see co- sleeping as bonding but I would imagine your baby does. What baby wouldn't? She gets to nurse and then remain close to you as she sleeps. I am very happy to have my bed back with my husband but I am happy that we co-slept with our kids. But that's just how I feel about bed sharing, of course.

Sylvia - posted on 07/26/2011

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Emma, it's easier if you're used to it :) Or maybe it would be more accurate to say it's *normal* if you're used to it.

Stifler's - posted on 07/26/2011

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i freaked out about it last night. damian and i would never have time to have sex if logan slept in our bed. he goes to work at 5am... comes home at 6pm... the kids are both up when he gets back and then if logan is sleeping in our bed when do we have sex?

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/26/2011

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And to be completely honest, I did not THINK I was bed sharing, this thread made me realize I indeed was....last night when I told my husband to go get her and bring her into bed...the little light went on in my head. I didn't think I was, because she doesn't come into bed with me...she starts in her crib.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/26/2011

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Well Jenn, and everyone else....I am gonna let you in on a little secret. Specifically because of what you wrote "For those who've not co-slept with their children from birth, I can understand how there's a disconnect with how it could be beneficial and only see it as negative. However, those of us who've spent months or years sharing our bed with our children will forever view co-sleeping differently. "

NOT TRUE! NOT TRUE! Here is my secret.....are you ready? Drum roll please......I bed share. Yup.....I know....I am sure a few jaws have dropped...I think I actually heard them hit the keyboards on a few of you.

My daughter has been a tough one. She would only sleep on the boob. I would sleep with her on a pillow on the couch, or in the bed with me when she got older, so I could pop a boob in her mouth and still get some sleep. Some of you may know, at one point I was only getting 4 hours of sleep per 24 hour period for like 6 months. It was horrible. Long story short, when she wakes up in the middle of the night, she comes into bed. Do I like it? Sometimes I enjoy snuggling....but then she moves around so damned much and keeps me up. Do I want to continue? Nope. I am weening her right now, and soon will be done all together. I don't think bed sharing is making us bond more. I want my bed back.

So no, not all people bed share and enjoy it or even have the same perspective as you Jenn, I am doing it out of necessity to sleep....period. I have bed shared with my daughter for 15 months, since she was born, my views as of now are not forever changed.

[deleted account]

That may have something to do with the new baby.Jealousy can give a child fear of abandonment because he's "losing his mommy" which would make him scared to sleep alone. Jealousy is a normal feeling when a new sibling comes into the picture. I would just make sure to get one on one time with him, it will pass eventually.

Stifler's - posted on 07/26/2011

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My kid just rolls around and stands up and sticks his fingers up our noses. He's suddenly scared of his room when he's slept alone his entire life.

Jenn - posted on 07/26/2011

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I believe a child's dependence or lack of has to do with a myriad of reasons, not specifically bed sharing. My children are very different from each other but both bed shared and both are very independent and secure. I find it so interesting that some believe bed sharing leads to only negative results in a child's development rather than many positive.

My husband bed-shared with his mother until he was 6 (she was a nurse and worked long hours so it was more time together for them) and he's THE most independent person I've ever met! His mom groomed him to be a secure, loving man who stands on his own two feet. He's no mama's boy either. Thank God! *gag*

I didn't bed share with my parents. I was always afraid of the dark, terribly shy and clingy to my mother. I didn't have the closeness with my parents that my children have with my husband and I. I believe bed sharing has something to do with our family's close bond.

For those who've not co-slept with their children from birth, I can understand how there's a disconnect with how it could be beneficial and only see it as negative. However, those of us who've spent months or years sharing our bed with our children will forever view co-sleeping differently.

Minnie - posted on 07/26/2011

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Julianne's right. When you bedshare from day one it just becomes second nature. Our eldest daughter never had a problem with a newborn in the bed. I'm a pretty light sleeper and I have to have a fan going to drown out annoying noises but the noises of my family sleeping don't bother me.



I imagine it definitely would be difficult to adjust if a person isn't used to it.

Minnie - posted on 07/26/2011

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What's kind of interesting is that my mother coslept with both my sister and I but not my brother. And he's the one still at home at 24.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/26/2011

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As far as the dependence/independence of a child that does bed share, I think it depends on the particular child. If they are already quite dependent on the parents, I have seen it make them even more clingy. This is talking about my sister and her 2 kids. The daughter is very independent. The son, not so much. They both bed shared, and I can literally see the damage it has done to the son. They are both beautifully nurtured, creative, smart....but I can see the problem.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/26/2011

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Yes Amie, the people that I know (and I know a lot more than I would like to admit) that still live at home with their parents...range ages 27-40 have never even attempted to go out on their own. They may have jobs, bills and attended college, but they have absolutely no lives. I can take one specific person in my mind and tell you all the things that make me sad...what is the point? She is not independent, and even when the parents went on their second honeymoon....she came. She was 35 at the time. She is the second youngest. All the rest of her brothers and sisters 3 brothers 1 sister have all moved out and had families etc....they have lives. I have no idea if she slept in the parents bed.

[deleted account]

LOL@ emma.its not for everyone!...when you co-sleep on a regular basis you adapt to bed sharing...i use to not be able to sleep in the same bed as my SO, now i can't sleep without him!

Merry - posted on 07/26/2011

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Haha I can't fall asleep unless I'm holding Fierna! Lol everyone's different! Although it was very easy for me cuz she was born at 10pm and by the time I got cleaned up and got her weighed and dressed etc it was near 12 and so I had just barely met her I wasn't about to put her down! So even though we had planned on bed sharing, I think I would have done it at least that first night regardless since she had only been out of me a fee short hours when I needed to sleep! Eric was born 4:30am so by that night I felt ok letting him sleep in the hospital bassinet.....

Stifler's - posted on 07/26/2011

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My kid slept in our bed from 3am last night. it was horrifying. I am so tired I don't know how people do it.

April - posted on 07/26/2011

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I like Sharon's quote. "Pick a bed, any bed, and SLEEP!" To me, the only thing that is unhealthy is when someone in the family is seriously lacking sleep. For some families, it's just too uncomfortable to sleep with your kids and for others it's the other way around. As a parent, I do whatever gets me and my child the most sleep. I am also a "we'll cross that bridge when we get to it" type of parent. Why assume something will be a problem when it might not be? Instead of worrying about what could or might happen later on, I try to take parenthood one day at a time and do what works NOW. I don't know that I call myself an AP. I do like the sling wearing and the bedsharing and the natural duration nursing and i like the gentle discipline. However, if I have to give myself a title, I call myself the "this is what's working today" type. :)

April - posted on 07/25/2011

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ah. i have special circumstances. i am profoundly deaf. i NEED for my son to be in my room with me. he does have his crib, which he sleeps in when my husband is home. when my husband works out of town, my son sleeps in bed with me. i do have a special alarm that vibrates my pillow when my son cries for me, however, he is past that stage of crying in his crib for Mommy. He's 2, he has a great vocabulary, and rarely relies on crying to get what he needs/wants. That means, my fancy crying machine that shakes my pillow is ineffective at night. It makes me uncomfortable to be asleep when he is awake, so in my he goes. I have NO IDEA how long we will be bed-sharing for. I have to feel comfortable that he is going to be okay without me first. Right now, I feel that he would stay in his own bed but feel too scared to come to my room. I'd feel terrible if he cried himself to sleep while I slept on! Even if I didn't have unique circumstances, I would still feel more comfortable at least room sharing, My gut just says it is the right thing to do. For now.

April - posted on 07/25/2011

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ah. i have special circumstances. i am profoundly deaf. i NEED for my son to be in my room with me. he does have his crib, which he sleeps in when my husband is home. when my husband works out of town, my son sleeps in bed with me. i do have a special alarm that vibrates my pillow when my son cries for me, however, he is past that stage of crying in his crib for Mommy. He's 2, he has a great vocabulary, and rarely relies on crying to get what he needs/wants. That means, my fancy crying machine that shakes my pillow is ineffective at night. It makes me uncomfortable to be asleep when he is awake, so in my he goes. I have NO IDEA how long we will be bed-sharing for. I have to feel comfortable that he is going to be okay without me first. Right now, I feel that he would stay in his own bed but feel too scared to come to my room. I'd feel terrible if he cried himself to sleep while I slept on! Even if I didn't have unique circumstances, I would still feel more comfortable at least room sharing, My gut just says it is the right thing to do. For now.

Stifler's - posted on 07/25/2011

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I'm so not an AP. At all. I don't see the problem with this at all. Then again, I've never let our kids sleep in our bed.

Merry - posted on 07/24/2011

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Sherri, I'm not saying I allow disrespectful tine of voice asking over and over 'but why!'
Lol. But I don't agree they should do what I say without knowing why I said it most of the time. Yes sometimes I'll have to say I can't explain just do it. But usually if I give a direction they will be able to ask why.
Example, if I said stay out of the kitchen and he said why? I'd explain, because I have a pot on the stove and I have to run to the bathroom. In that case I see no disresepect in a simple question of why.
But if I said come here right now and he stood there and said why? I'd say come here now or......(insert punishment)
Sometimes you need to be able to get your kid to obey without questioning. But most of the time I'll welcome questions as long as the tone and intention is good :)
And yes, if I'm certain he knows why already and is just trying to be difficult then I see it as disrespectful.
As for sleep, yes if I didn't get at least 5 hours straight then I'd be quite grumpy but if after 5-6 hrs i have to wake to nurse someone and fallback asleep it doesnt bother me.

[deleted account]

Everynight without fail one of my 3 kids will come in and sleep with me. Could be anyone of them at anytime. The hard thing is that once there is one in bed with me and another comes in the bed seems to get so small so quickly so now we kind of have a rotating roster for me bed. If one was in the bed one night then the next night it's the others turn and to stop crying in the middle of the night if one is already in my bed then they get to sleep on our lounge (my bedroom is right next to the longeroom). I don't mind co-sleeping and i tend to lean towards the idea that allowing them to co-sleep makes for very independant children. I have 2 very very independant children who are not afraid to get out there and be social. My other child is only 1 so time will tell with him.

[deleted account]

I believe I lean towards AP although not entirely and I for the most like Jo Frost, I feel she does take kids feelings into consideration, we have to remember that her shows are only an hour long so the 'boring' stuff is edited out. I have seen shows where she gets the children involved in the new routines so I'm sure she would do that with the others. The shows also deal with problem behaviours that the parents have asked for help with.



Now saying that even though I used a modified gentle version of Ferber I do not agree with leaving your child to scream themselves to sleep that is cruel. When Ethan wakes in the night sometimes he settles himself, sometimes he needs us, on those nights we bring him into our bed, but usually after about 15 minutes he wants to go back to his bed (there have been a few nights where Poppy has woken him up and he has gone to sleep with us). There are some nights where I find Poppy sleeps better when snuggled with us, but I don't want to make a habit of having the kids sleeping with us because I sleep better without them.



My SIL has co-slept with al three of hers and her 21 and 18 yo sleep perfectly well on their own, her 4 yo still sleeps with them, I say do what works for your family, Jo Frost works for the families that want her help.



Edited to finish the post as I clicked post by accident.

Amie - posted on 07/24/2011

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"Yes Amie, I specifically remember that conversation. To me, it is the same thought process as a 35 year old still living at home with the parents never seeking independence. It makes me uncomfortable. Maybe it is because we never did it. That is fine, I can admit that."

Ah but that's an assumption that a 35 yr old living at home isn't independent. I have a 35 yr old friend who still lives at home with her mom. She's never left home. They live in the city, she went to school and university here. Now she works here. She lives with her mom (her dad died a few years ago). She comes and goes, she has her own bills (including her share of the home bills), she travels all over the world multiple times a year. She is independent, she just likes being at home for many reasons. It's not because of a dependence. There are people out there like that but I don't see them as the majority. Maybe they are in your experience?

The two don't go hand in hand. That's what I've been trying to say. You see our methods as fostering dependence when I know, that's not true. It takes a lot more than this one technique to allow a child to become dependent. The kids who I see as dependent on their parents are the ones who are allowed no freedom to learn and are not taught how to be on their own. I do know one teenager/young adult who is like this. His parents did nothing to prepare him for adulthood, so now at 20 he stays at home because he can't function in society. He doesn't have the tools to be an adult because his parents (their words) "wanted him to be a kid and enjoy being a kid". Which also included, I'll add just because it makes me sick, buying him a brand new car and taking care of all the expenses. From initial cost to plates to gas. Ugh.

Merry - posted on 07/24/2011

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I think its a common misconception that in order to get a good nights sleep it must be a continuous amount of time without waking.
Most people have a few wakings a night and if you move to another bed or to the couch etc it's not a problem!
I think a flexible attitude towards bed time is good. When we get too strict that's when kids have more issues with nightmares and bed wetting.

[deleted account]

Thanks Laura! Part of it also is for me, since I have so many of my own sleep issues, they leave the bed to myself most of the time. But there are still times where hubby is in another bed, but my son snuggles up to me in my bed. It's hit or miss which bed (or couch) you wake up in! But in the morning, if we all had a good night's sleep then it doesn;t matter where you sleep.

[deleted account]

It's 7:30 am here, and hubby ended up in my 6 year old son's bed....and still there, both are sleeping peacefully! I think my son came in to our bed at 1 am. Somehow they both ended up in the other bed. It's a comfort thing, and we just don't feel it's an issue to ignore his need for comfort at 1 am! We all need sleep. If bed sharing isn't for yo uor your family, then why bother to knock down what works for another family? As far as independence goes-eeeks! My son is also fiercely independent and it's making me realize that he's growing up all too fast! But hey, for bedtime, this is truly the only situation where, yes, he IS dependent on the comfort his parents provide!

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/24/2011

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Yes Amie, I specifically remember that conversation. To me, it is the same thought process as a 35 year old still living at home with the parents never seeking independence. It makes me uncomfortable. Maybe it is because we never did it. That is fine, I can admit that.

Merry - posted on 07/24/2011

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At this point I think her methods work for 'bad kids' but not my kids.
Which is a bad thought process but I think that if you let your kids get that out of control they might need some firm discipline. But I *think* that if you don't let them get that bad then you should never have to do such forceful methods.
Im no expert, erics only 2. Don't have much experience yet so my ideas aren't fully formed.

Amie - posted on 07/23/2011

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Dyan, That's fine. The only difference I have is I don't get back up and move them to their room. They cuddle in with us or on the couch in our room (sometimes just being close helps) and go back to sleep. Sometimes they wake us up fully, sometimes just a tiny bit to get us to move over or not at all. We're still helping our children and we all get a good nights sleep.

Marina, my children, myself and my siblings are fiercely independent. We are all a co-sleeping/bedsharing family (I've mentioned that before in a thread such as this I'm sure). My sister, at 18, still climbs in with my mom at night sometimes when she's home. Being independent or dependent on your parents comes from a lot more than whether or not you co-sleep/bedshare. For some families it might be that way but it's just happenstance if they DO use this method.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/23/2011

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Thank you for clarifying Kylie, your post was very confusing in that regard.

Kylie - posted on 07/23/2011

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My 6 year sleeps in her own room. I was just answering hypothetically.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/23/2011

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So Kyle, if you don't like sleeping with your 6 year old, why do you continue to do it?!?

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/23/2011

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Yup, gotta agree with the technique Dyan is offering. For the most part, my door is open. I don't make it a habit for my kids to sleep with us. As the occasional 5am wake up thing, fine, or wicked scary nightmare....but for us bed sharing on a regular basis does not work. I cannot help but feel that it encourages more independence.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/23/2011

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Amie, you may have meant it as rhetorical, but I read it as quite literal question, and I am sure I am not the only one.

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