Spin off: Can we debate breastfeeding?

Teresa - posted on 06/30/2011 ( 153 moms have responded )

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Not the benefits of it but that everyone can do it?

I had trouble breastfeeding all my kids (5) but that last was the worst. I have a real problem with those who criticize women who can't make it work for them and their babies. As much as I want to be a milk making machine for my child, I cannot.

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Krista - posted on 07/08/2011

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But there are also genuine reasons. I see people who dont even try breast feeding oor put in no effort which to me, shows that person is not ready to be a mother,

Ella, that's very judgmental. You don't know those people's lives. They very likely HAVE their own reasons for not even wanting to try to breastfeed. And to say that it shows that the person is not ready to be a mother is very unkind and inaccurate. Some women do not want to breastfeed because they are very emotionally uncomfortable with it -- perhaps due to their own history, they are completely unable to mentally de-sexualize their own breasts. Perhaps they'd been assaulted in the past, and don't want ANYBODY touching their breasts at all.

The thing is...you don't know. And neither do I. So you may want to consider that before you leap to such conclusions.

Merry - posted on 06/30/2011

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I think most womens bodies are capable, but not all woman can do what it takes to make it work, like some women's bodies can make enough milk nursing every three hours, but some women have to nurse every hour or so to have enough stimulation to make enough milk.
There's alot of misconceptions about how to breastfeed, and alot of myths floating around. And obviously there's actual medical reasons some women can't.
But there's alot of reasons women think they can't when they actually could.
One lady told me she couldn't breastfeed because her baby was 10lbs at birth so she couldn't make enough for such a big baby. Or another lady said she couldn't breastfeed because she doesn't eat organic. Or another said she couldn't because her baby had reflux.
None of these are really solid reasons to quit nursing.
But these women really felt like they couldn't. Some drs even tell women they can't nurse while on certain medications, and yet there's almost always a different medication for the same thing that is compatible with nursing.
Idk, I am skeptical about stories where women say they couldn't breastfeed simply because I've heard so many reasons where I know how to fix it, but I couldn't say for everyone.
Also, for those of us who have successfully breastfed we find it hard to believe sometimes because it's usually really hard to make it work, but we feel like we struggled through it and it was so hard and finally we figured it out, so there's a thought of, it was so hard but I made it work, maybe they didn't try hard enough.
But that's judgement no one should be making, we have no idea how badly some women try, and some might give up quickly, but others might try so hard, harder then anyone else and yet not be able.

In the end judgement does no good, but getting the correct info out there helps so much, if every woman could understand every bit of info pertaining to breastfeeding and have all the support and encouragement possible, I bet we would see a vast amount of women succeeding in breastfeeding. But that's not how it is :(

I ditto everything Lisa said as well :)

Minnie - posted on 06/30/2011

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I don't think you'll get many replies saying that _everyone_ can do it.



My argument: prior to the advent of modern reproductive technology the percentage of women who could not breastfeed hovered somewhere around 1-2%. However, with more women needing help ovulating and conceiving it makes sense that the percentage is a bit higher because we have more women conceiving who have reproductive systems that already have challenges.



However, I will say that I do not believe that every mother who said that she just couldn't produce enough milk truly couldn't. Breastfeeding management misinformation abounds. Not criticism of those mothers; breastfeeding can be a real challenge in our society and to be successful at breastfeeding is to be in the vast minority, statistically speaking.



I'm not saying that I automatically assume that when a mother says she couldn't make enough milk that she could have, that would be judgemental, just that I know that many women don't have the resources and help to be successful.

Mrs. - posted on 07/02/2011

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Sometimes the notion of "if only those women who have issues had more support, then they could bf" reminds me a bit of missionaries trying to convert the heathens. You know, "if only they knew about Jesus being the lord, they would want to be saved."

No amount of support would have made bfeeding okay for me. I actually had a ton of info and breastfeeding advice...lactation consulting, docs, therapists. At the end, it is not for me mentally or physically. All the support in the world did boo for me. I'm thinking a lot of women had the same experience.

Mrs. - posted on 06/30/2011

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Whelp, lot of people could probably live off of just Power Bars and water for a year if they really tried...medically they would survive...but would they be all that happy or well-adjusted?

You know, I'd say for some if the women that may be included in the "say they can't but probably medically could" category, might medically be able to breastfeed if they do a myriad of things, create constant physical and mental stress in their lives and give up any chance of having a healthy relationship with their baby when it comes to nourishment. Now, I suppose "medically" speaking they might be able to if they were to do all those things, but if you are one of those women who don't have to do all those things, does it really seem like the same kind of "easy" sacrifice to do so?

When I speak about "can't" breastfeeding, I don't think of it as just one thing...producing enough milk. I think of it as a whole lot of painful mental and physical struggles...plus a lack of milk production.

I respect a woman who says she tried and "can't" with the understanding that is might not just be one issue with production, but perhaps many that are really none of my business.

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♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 08/08/2011

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I breastfeed nearly exclusively with my 5 month old (Well why don't one of you all try to breast feed in a moving vehicle while driving or when you're working. :D) I've only had a few issues with her including pinching my nipple with her gums (OUCH!)

That said I couldn't manage to breastfeed my now 6 (almost 7) year old daughter for the life of me. I tried pretty much from the time the drugs wore off until I went back on birth control. She didn't want breast milk. I don't know if it was becuase I was really stressed from the circumstances with my older daughter's father or just because I couldn't do it. But I couldn't do it. And sometimes I really felt like crap about it.

I scrolled through some of the posts and read something about bonding. Sometimes being the only one my 5 month old will take food from makes me resent breastfeeding because when I want to sleep a bit more and she's hungry all I can think is: Damn if I had bottle fed this wouldn't be happening and my non lactating male counterpart could do this shit! I love my baby, but sometimes being the only cow who has the good milk sucks.

I also don't have anyone I can go to to get advice for breastfeeding. As I've stated in a few posts, I'm adopted so I was pretty much bottle fed from birth. My mom in law bottle fed too. I use the breast feeding mom's forum to get help on having issues on breastfeeding. My mom didn't even like when I breastfed in public. So it was pretty hard sometimes until I moved.

Jessica - posted on 08/07/2011

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My youngest was at the odd almost early mark. one day difference between premee and full term. He was tiny... as in any smaller and they were going to put HIM in the NICU and they bugged me about him needing to gain weight. the only thing I was worried about was the weight he lost and how I thought he would do better at home than in the NICU. We took him home, but I have to say. I think tiny baby's get the weight all on their own. It takes time, but it does get their. It took rohan a month before he was really up in the chub, and then he shot up. this is a pattern. some kids are just small like that. my oldest is solid... I mean like he does NOT look like he is the weight he is... but he is built solid. so.... the weight issue bothers me as a mother, as a midwife, as a woman, and as someone trained in homeopathic remedies. Why pudge up babies who are in the NICU before their bodies decide it is time?

Tanya - posted on 08/07/2011

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It's actually not true that formula is better for premature babies. I work in a NICU, and though we often have to fortify breast milk, we really avoid using formula for our babies. Personally, I think we put WAY too much importance on weight...I think more research needs to be done regarding whether we REALLY need to be so concerned about "fattening up" prem babies. I think that the benefits of having breast milk (unfortified) has got to outweigh the benefits of just putting on weight. Certainly, some babies will definitely need to be supplemented, but I think we do it way too often.

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Martina not everyone gets the bonding from bf, for some women it pushes them away from their baby and you are very wrong when you insinuate that bf creates a stronger bond than bottle feeding - I have done both I bottle fed my son because he never latched, so he had expressed breast milk for 3 weeks and then formula; my daughter is 2 1/2 months old and is still going strong with bf. The bond I have with both of them is just as strong, even if you can't/ don't want to bf a child you can still get the same bond by skin to skin, holding the child close when feeding, spending time with the child etc. Bf doesn't make the bond the closeness does!

Martina - posted on 08/06/2011

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I breastfed both my boys and I plan to breastfeed my 3rd, I am all for breastfeeding and think everyone should at least give it a go, I know a lot of people that didn't try breastfeeding and they regretted it after. I only breastfed my first for 6weeks and it took 2weeks for me and him to get it right! with my second I breastfed for 4mnths and did a combo of both bottle and breast after the 3rd month, I also had mastitis with my second which was horrible to say the least but breastfeeding is more than just feeding there's a bond there that you don't get with bottle, the feeling that you are all your baby needs to survive is just magical! but then that's me I liked the fact my boobs went from size B to D and that I lost my baby weight quicker also not having to get up and make a bottle at 2 in the morning just bim bam bosh and the milk was there on tap waiting! lol but on the other hand if you have a premi baby that's very under weight formula is definitely better because your baby will put on weight quicker xx

America3437 - posted on 08/02/2011

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How about the issuse of uncomfortable! I was totally not comfortable with the idea of the whole thing! Breastfeeding is not for everyone and I graciously bow to those who can do it!!!

Roxanne - posted on 08/02/2011

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I was able to breast feed my daughter for 6 1/2 months then I stopped producing enough to satisfy her she is now 8 1/2 months and I'm having alot of problems with just my left breast still trying to produce one drop. And that one drop makes my breast hurt really bad. I've had problems with yeast infection in that breast as well as clogged ducts. I'm not sure if I will be able to nurse again if we have another baby. Most of the women in my family were unable to produce enough milk if any at all for their children.

Jessica - posted on 07/28/2011

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There are other medical issues besides not making enough milk. Lets not forget PPD can cause a women trouble with so much of life, the stress breastfeeding can be overwhelming and make PPD worst. Also certain medicines a mom needs to be on could be harmful to their infant. And sometimes it's the infant. There are so many variables of why a women is unable to breastfeed.



I tried with all 3 of mine and only one I was able to breastfeed for 14 months. And I hated it. I'm not sure it was the best choice for her either. I was always in pain feeding her the whole 14months my breasts while nursing would feel like they were on fire. I didn't have thrush and she was latched properly.



With my son I only breastfed for a month due to having two older children involved in a ton of things my husband working 80 hours a week and me having PPD. I was so ashamed to buy formal the first time I sent my mom to the store for it. So silly!



My very first child was weak and she couldn't hold suction not even when bottle fed. I pumped for her for 2+months and then couldn't produce anymore. For her first 6 months being bottle fed she would leak while drinking breastmilk/formula I remember washing so many outfits, bibs and burp clothes in a day.

April - posted on 07/21/2011

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I agree with Heather that some women have extreme life circumstances that interfere with breastfeeding. I know a girl who had a premature baby that had to stay in the hospital for almost a year. The cost of having an infant live in a hospital forced her to work multiple jobs, plus she had to travel to the hospital everyday, which was in the city. She still pumps and her milk is added to a special formula designed only for her daughter. Her daughter is now home after 300 days and she was hoping to put her to the breast. Unfortunately, 300 days is a lot of days to not have the consistent stimulation by the best person to help keep up her milk supply. Lack of stimulation is only just part of it! This preemie has a sucking reflex so weak that she hasn't picked up on bottle feeding either ( tube fed for now). Thirdly, my friend has several blood clotting disorders that don't allow her to take medicine to boost milk supply. The whole point of this story is...for many women who don't or can't breastfeed...there is often more than one obstacle in their way.

April - posted on 07/21/2011

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I agree with Heather that some women have extreme life circumstances that interfere with breastfeeding. I know a girl who had a premature baby that had to stay in the hospital for almost a year. The cost of having an infant live in a hospital forced her to work multiple jobs, plus she had to travel to the hospital everyday, which was in the city. She still pumps and her milk is added to a special formula designed only for her daughter. Her daughter is now home after 300 days and she was hoping to put her to the breast. Unfortunately, 300 days is a lot of days to not have the consistent stimulation by the best person to help keep up her milk supply. Lack of stimulation is only just part of it! This preemie has a sucking reflex so weak that she hasn't picked up on bottle feeding either ( tube fed for now). Thirdly, my friend has several blood clotting disorders that don't allow her to take medicine to boost milk supply. The whole point of this story is...for many women who don't or can't breastfeed...there is often more than one obstacle in their way.

Stifler's - posted on 07/20/2011

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I have no red hair and I had extreme nipple pain feeding renae. Not with Logan though.

Bridgette - posted on 07/20/2011

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I was a person who had a large baby who was breastfed but could not get enough milk to satisfy him, so we had to suppliment. I had all the possible help at the hospital but still didnt work. Even tried to pump in between feedings but could not get the amount up.

Were I to have this trouble 30 years ago I would have been more concerned, but today there are so many good alternatives out there (formulas) which can keep the baby healthy I didnt feel quite as bad. The truth is that there are those not willing to put in the time, but just as many who cannot do it. I dont feel my inability makes me any better or worse of a parent to my baby!

Merry - posted on 07/20/2011

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Hmm I have natural red tones in my hair in the summer, and I have on and off nipple pain.....interesting.

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"It sounds like you were deficient in progesterone, perhaps, which does play a role in breastfeeding"

That was the reason for my miscarriages, but I never learned that it played a role in milk production until many years after-the-fact. It does make sense, and mixed with post partum depression, early baby arrival, and other factors, I wish I could have made that correlation. It got to the point that I was forcing myself to like nursing, and it was just the complete opppsite. Nursing became a burden and chore, and while I squeezed milk out of me for 9 months, it was just as a supplement to the formula that filled my son's belly. But every now and then I think about the "what if" I was on progesterone meds while nursing, would I produce more milk? Who knows! And at this point in my life I don't ever want to find out!

Tanya - posted on 07/19/2011

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Teresa, I think there are lots of reasons why some women don't enjoy breastfeeding. Did you know that redheaded women tend to have overly sensitive nipples? For some of these women, breastfeeding is ALWAYS painful, no matter what they do. I've dealt with sore nipples, and I can't imagine having to deal with that for more than a couple of weeks.


As important as I think breastfeeding is, there is also something to be said for the enjoyment of feeding your child. I absolutely don't think that women should continue to breastfeed if they hate it. In rare cases, there can be risks to breastfeeding, and that's why every woman should be able to make the best decision for her and her child.

Tanya - posted on 07/19/2011

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Stephanie, I wouldn't at all be surprised. It sounds like you were deficient in progesterone, perhaps, which does play a role in breastfeeding. And I'm sorry that you didn't get the choice. It's not really fair, is it?


What bugs me the most is that these women have no clue about it! So they try and they try, and they end up beating themselves up over it when it doesn't work. I can only imagine how frustrating and devastating that must be.

Jessica - posted on 07/19/2011

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Could be the case with me. I have had several miscarriages because of my body not producing enough of this or that hormone. The theory with my youngest, being that it was easier because they were already built up from my oldest. Could be combined with my allergy. Who knows. My doc never checked, even though I asked him to.

Tanya. I am sure you stepped on a lot of toes, but I agree with you. I have to say though, I envy those who have the choice. I tried so hard, but my body just couldn't do what I needed it to. You are the first person I have seen, besides, myself, try to say it that way. You say it better though. thank you.

Teresa - posted on 07/19/2011

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I wonder if my hormones were whacked? I did getr pg on my own but I was over 40 and never felt good while nursing, as much as I wanted to do i t.

Tanya - posted on 07/19/2011

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I am a huge lactivist. I support informed choice. If a mother doesn't want to breastfeed, and she knows all the risks and benefits, then fine! It's her body, and her baby. Not a decision I would ever make, but we are all different.


I do have an issue, though, when someone doesn't really WANT to breastfeed, gives a half-hearted effort just to appease others, and then goes and tells people that they "couldn't breastfeed". Well, yeah, if you introduce bottles from day 1, hardly ever put the baby to breast, pump a few times, and then stop because you're not getting anything, then you're not going to be able to breastfeed. But don't go tell people that you couldn't produce enough milk, because with ALL these stories around, it's very discouraging.


OWN your decision. There is absolutely NOTHING to be ashamed of, in my opinion. It's your body, nobody else's, and nobody has the right to tell you what you should do with it. So, if you don't want to breastfeed, then don't. And hold your head high.


If you DO want to breastfeed, then I wish you all the best. It's certainly not easy in our society! There is a serious lack of support and information about breastfeeding. There are roadblocks absolutely everywhere. You will be a minority, and you will feel ostracized and outcast at least once!


That's why I'm a lactivist. I have no interest in forcing anybody to breastfeed. I only want to provide information so that women can make informed decisions, and to support those women who DO want to breastfeed, so that they can do so successfully.


And as for the women who really DO want to breastfeed, but can't. It's not your fault. It's probably either due to a lack of support, misinformation, or a medical reason. With so many babies being born through fertility treatments these days, it makes sense....if your body's hormones are out of whack enough that you can't get pregnant, they may not allow your body to produce milk, either. I can't tell you how many times I've heard a story of a woman who couldn't breastfeed, only to find out that she has PCOS. And I'd bet any amount of money that's why.


I would really like to see more breast milk available for the babies of mothers who can't, or don't want to, breastfeed. I think the health implications could be huge. But, our society has a LONG way to go before that happens.

Jessica - posted on 07/12/2011

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it does not stop the milk from coming in(that I know of), but it does screw with mommy's head. In the end sometimes their are women who have a choice between going insane from it or using formula.



*edited*



Someone "rated" this as funny.



How is that funny and did they think it was a joke?

Stifler's - posted on 07/12/2011

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I see my breasts as sexual but I don't think that was why my milk didn't come in. I had no sexual feelings when my kids fed, only when my husband touched them.

Jessica - posted on 07/11/2011

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I did have flashbacks while breastfeeding but I was assaulted too many times to do that i guess. I disassociate. I am incapable of sexualizing my breasts... or the rest of myself. I do however look at my body and see it as a tool... which pisses me off... but it only made my inability to breast-feed harder. After all... if a breast is a tool to feed your baby... then what use is it if you can't use it?

I do, however see that point. Some people cannot get over some things. I have plenty of things I have not overcome yet. Just because they are not past it, does not lessen their love of their children.

Ella - posted on 07/11/2011

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I can sort of understand that, but to me breast feeding wasn't about something sexual so I had no problems, while I cried and got very upset and alot of other emotions during sex every single time (due to abuse) it never once affected my breastf eeding relationship. To me it wasn't sexual, but I can understand that some people may have issues because of that

Amanda - posted on 07/11/2011

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I agree with some of what Ella wrote, I also have noticed a trend that most women who were molested, raped ect when they were younger ( and before anyone goes off the deep end here I was molested by 3 different people before I was in the third grade and 1 was jailed because of it) I am not saying it was easy to get past but I have noticed most women are stating they never bothered to educate themselves which I think is VERY irresponsible of any parent. I read several books and got daily emails from several sources about parenting AND Breastfeeding because to me my son was more important to me than my past and I wasn't going to put him second or allow him to miss out on the benefits of breastfeeding because of something which was totally not his fault

Ella - posted on 07/11/2011

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I apologise if I came across as rude, it is just the way that I feel. I believe every baby deserves the best start the life where possible

Nikkole - posted on 07/08/2011

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@Krista E i agree with you 100%

When i was younger (7) i was molested by my neighbor and her boyfriend and ever since then i just felt like breast were nothing more than a sexual part of the body that men could play with, and my mother told me horror stories of her brest feeding my sister nad how it was gross and how i shouldn't do it im 23 with 2 kids and i regret not trying to breastfeed but i was not educated on the subject and had support ONLY from my husband which wasn't the best help (he tried) But to say if you don't at least TRY and breast feed then your not ready to be a mother is COMPLETE bull crap I was ready to be a mother or else i wouldn't have gotten pregnant with my kids i am the BEST mother i know how to be and my kids come first in my life! Ella i find your statement VERY judgmental and RUDE! But i see now that breastfeeding is best IF you can do it or want to do it i do not judge others for there choices and neither should anyone else unless the parent is bringing harm to there child!

Jessica - posted on 07/08/2011

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At-least when I stir the pot(not on purpose but sometimes that's what happens), so to speak, I stay and deal with it...

[deleted account]

"I see people who dont even try breast feeding oor put in no effort which to me, shows that person is not ready to be a mother,"

Wow.....I'm floored by this extremely judgemental comment. Lots of people SHOULDN'T be mothers for a variety of reasons. Lack of breastfeeding for whatever reaosn is not one of them. Ugh...again with those fly-by-night posters who come in , stir, the pot, then leave.

Ella - posted on 07/08/2011

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not everyone, some babies have issues where they cannot pssibly be breast fed, and sometimes I see people where it seems cruel for them to keep pushing thier starving unhappy babies to feed because they are so anti formula. But I am pro breast feeding, and am often called a breast feeding nazi because my own personal beliefs are that, our boobs are made to feed our babies, and that alot of people seem to go straight to a bottle because they want to pass thier child around and party. But there are also genuine reasons. I see people who dont even try breast feeding oor put in no effort which to me, shows that person is not ready to be a mother, and I see people who are so over the top with breast feeding they let their baby starve and make it live solely on milk for a year or 2. There should be a nice medium. If you can thats great if there are a medical reasons thats too bad, and at least your baby is fed, even if it is with a bottle

Amanda - posted on 07/05/2011

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i wan not able to get my son to breast feed when he was little so i went to formula i spent almost two years of his life feeling guilty because everyone else made me feel like i was being a bad mother for not breast feeding that i didn't try hard enough and that he wasn't going to get the proper nutrition...i eventually got over it and people stopped saying stuff once he finally got off the bottle all together. once i was pregnant again everyone started up again and i said no i was not going to try it at all...really it was just so people could stay off my back because i formula and breast feed her for a little over two months and everything was fine..i really think people should stop making such a fuss when its not their kid or their body and it is up to every mom wheather she wants to breast feed or not....

Merry - posted on 07/04/2011

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Toni, try holding poppy just like normal, and then slide down onto your side. Keep her head on your arm, and then she should stay latched just fine. Put a pillow or a rolled towel behind her back and rest your hand on the towel, it's quite comfy and her latch should be the same as if you were sitting, only big difference is she will be laying next to you instead of in your lap.

Jessica - posted on 07/04/2011

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I wouldn't say face down..... but KINDA. He was ;laying across me at kinda an angle. He didn't LIKE any other position and my breasts were not cooperative at most angles. Essentially, he was boob facing, facing straight down would have made me panic that he couldn't breath.... even more than I already did. I was scared my breasts would suffocate him.

Merry - posted on 07/04/2011

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I have bf Eric while be was in his carseat! Lol I wasn't buckled thi, so not ideal but Eric at least was secured. We got off at the very next exit but it was backed up due to heavy construction work on the freeway and we were in the country where off ramps were few and far between!

Lady Heather - posted on 07/04/2011

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I think for me successful breastfeeding would have been easier than formula feeding. We still had to feed very regularly because Freja was a snacker so the amount of feedings didn't change. Having to wash the bottles and always cart around formula was a total bitch. Paying for formula was a bitch. Planning out how much you needed to bring on the plane when your luggage is obviously restricted was a bitch. The only reason it was easier was because in my case it was either formula or nothing. Oh - and in a traffic jam you can stick a bottle in the kids face whereas boobs would be illegal...unless you are really talented and can feed them in the carseat. Can anyone do that? I'd like to think it's possible in case we are in that position on a road trip again. haha.

Minnie - posted on 07/04/2011

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Laura: Hmmm...I actually don't think the positioning has changed much at all. She just gets bigger, so her feet get lower and lower. I don't have to use a towel behind her, haven't since about five months or so. But I still put the pillows behind me in the same places. I have noticed quite recently though that it's becoming a bit difficult for her to be comfortable while nursing because I can't get her in as close anymore, and since my boobs have shrunk to nothing they're up higher.

Minnie - posted on 07/04/2011

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Well, Elfrieda, now that Adelaide is almost three my boobs have shrunk down into pitiful used 'B's' but when I have a newborn until 10 months or so I'm an E :).



I've never had a problem nursing and sleeping. It involves pillows in all the right places. When I nurse, and I still nurse Adelaide sometimes while we're sleeping, I usually have my bottom arm under the pillow and I use a big body pillow that I can put between my knees, shove under my lower back and also support my upper back. That way I can lean just a bit into the pillow but not fall backwards. Large breasts don't have to be a problem- bringing baby closer into your body will cause the baby's head to lift a bit so that the nose is away from the breast (the chin should be pressed into the lower breast anyways, for proper latching). When my girls were very little I put a rolled up towel behind their backs so they wouldn't shift around.

Stifler's - posted on 07/04/2011

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We did a test feed on Logan and he lost weight during a feed lol also, the nurses here are extremely pro breastfeeding but not in a "you must breastfeed there is no other option while at this hospital way". If you want to formula feed they will help you do that too and they did everything to help me like teach mehow to express and feed with a syringe because neither of them would latch, we did several different positions and all of that and I just never got my milk in and I know it can allegedly take 2 weeks but seriously what are you supposed to do.. let your kid starve in that time? Also they would never latch lying down and it was uncomfortable, the whole feeding thing was uncomfortable for me.

[deleted account]

I was wondering about the latching at night because I can't get Poppy to latch while I'm lying down, I have to be sat up usually in a chair. I know when I bf at night I'm losing more sleep than if I bottle feed which is another reason I do both.

Tania - posted on 07/04/2011

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I'm happy there is support for women who struggle with BF but for women like me who can't BF because of medical reason there was zero support or understanding. I found really nothing on the internet and no one I know has had any medical issues. That is what I found the hardest for me when I was pregnant. There should be support for all women.

Merry - posted on 07/04/2011

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Oh, aside from her neck on my arm she isn't on me at all, she is totally on the bed. I usually have her bundled up in a blanket so I can position her on her side next to me.
Works well :)

Elfrieda - posted on 07/04/2011

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Thanks Laura. I guess I'll come back to this when I actually have a newborn. :) I wish I'd had this resource when my son was small. Also, sorry everybody for diverting the thread!

Elfrieda - posted on 07/04/2011

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Thanks, Stephanie. I know that big breasts have their own challenges. One point of clarification: So was your son lying face-down on top of you while you were leaning back against some pillows?

Merry - posted on 07/04/2011

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Elfraida, I'm not Lisa :) but I figure I'll give you my info as well, I'm a D, Fierna is almost 2 months and we've ben bed sharing the who,e time, I hold her in the cradle hold, her head in the crook of my elbow, then I lay down and put her on the nipple. I usually cuddle around her with my top leg bent and put it up under her butt and my bottom leg straight and down. So I'm sort of on my side for the top of my body but the bottom of me is almost on my stomach curled around her.
Obviously as she grows I'll likely have to reposition ourselves but so far this works great. When I switch boobs I just roll her over the top of me and reposition on the other side. I do get stiff in the morning in my shoulder and neck cuz I usually don't even switch sides most nights so I'm essentially sleeping all night in one position. But I get a grat deal of sleep so inll deal with some soreness :) I assume when she's a bit bigger I'll be able to get even more comfy as I won't have to be constantly aware of her breathing.
Lisa, I'm interested in how you sleep with an older baby, and then a toddler, how does the positioning change?

Jessica - posted on 07/04/2011

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I know I am not Lisa.... BUT.... at one point I was able to nurse my oldest (in the very beginning)..... and I think the BIGGER you are(I was a DD and now I am an I..... T.T) the harder it is.... however after propping and quite a bit of getting comfortable for both of us, I found that if I lay down propped up with him on top, it was easier to position and he even burped and fell asleep... so I was free to fall asleep too (I was propped all around so I had no chance of rolling over).

Elfrieda - posted on 07/04/2011

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Lisa, this is a personal question, so just ignore if it's too much. :) I'm going to remember that info about nursing in the carrier with the towel. It was really helpful, but now I want more! Could you explain to me how you nursed your baby in bed? Do you have big breasts that could reach over to the baby, or if not how did you deal with your lower arm when you were lying down? For me (I'm a B), I sometimes slept in bed with the baby, but I had to crank my arm as high as it could go under the pillow, and then sort of push my chest out while counterbalancing with my other shoulder so I wouldn't roll on top of the baby. I was able to sleep like that, but only because I was so exhausted I would have been able to sleep swinging upside down off the balcony. I tried not to do it more than every few days, because although I got a bit more sleep, my shoulder and neck really suffered, and I didn't get a full range of motion until the next day.

Jessica - posted on 07/04/2011

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As bad as my hospital was... we got lucky nurse-wise the second time around. I was supplementing (again with the NOT enough) because we had an early one who could not afford to lose the weight while breast feeding (if he lost any MORE weight than he did they would have made him stay) and waiting for my body to go to a point of production experience already dictated it would not go to... so the nurse was nice enough to sneak QUITE a few little formula thing's into our bags... quite useful since we had not expected him for another four weeks.... and had not bought ANY formula yet (good thing too.... ended up needing a different formula from his brother). Combined with the breast milk it lasted awhile...

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Wow interesting. At my hospital there were so generous with supplies. I got several packages of diapers, one of those suction thingies, pacifiers and TONS of fliers of information. I made a point to leave all the formula at the hospital and the nurse kept encouraging me to take it. I told her I was absolutely sure I didn't need it, and to give it to someone who did. I got home, unpacked the bag of stuff they gave me and discovered formula hidden at the bottom. Sigh. But nothing from LLL or ANY relevant info about breastfeeding.

About the not knowing how much they are getting...I never even thought to worry about it, until my SIL asked how much she was getting. Incidentally, my SIL started out BF but stopped, because she wasn't making enough milk according to her babies' weight and the pediatrician. She always seemed a little stressed because she wasn't sure how much the babies were drinking. But when she stopped, she was engorged for a few days. So I don't know what to think about that, except I wish she could have seen my pediatrician who encouraged BF despite my teeny tiny 3rd % baby. :/

Minnie - posted on 07/04/2011

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I am still at a lost as to why the LLL wouldn't send pamplets to hospitals on common breastfeeding misconceptions

We actually do, but they don't always make it to the mother. Some hospitals aren't as pro-breastfeeding. We've sent pamphlets to two hospitals in our local area; one puts them in those little black bags, the other doesn't.

I remember when I had my first the nurses were all about squashing her onto my boob, yelling at me for letting her nurse as long as she wanted and the 'lactation consultant' was nooo help whatsoever "oh, you have blisters now? Hmmm....they should fix soon." (but she never mentioned correct latching or positioning)

I didn't hear about LLL until I was pregnant with my second and went searching for good breastfeeding books. Those pamphlets that may make it in the take-home bag can get totally overwhelming, they're often so full of coupons and such that one from LLL I bet can get lost in the mix.

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