Vaccine schedules indifferent countries.

Tracey - posted on 02/29/2012 ( 27 moms have responded )

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Several Mums on here have stated that they don't want their babies near the unvaccinated until they are 2 years old. What jabs do other countries have that we don't in the UK?



We have the following

2 months

* Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b

* Pneumococcal infection



3 months:

* 5-in-1, second dose (DTaP/IPV/Hib)

* Meningitis C



4 months:

* 5-in-1, third dose (DTaP/IPV/Hib)

* Pneumococcal infection, second dose

* Meningitis C, second dose



Between 12 and 13 months:

* Meningitis C, third dose

* Hib, fourth dose (Hib/MenC given as a single jab)

* MMR (measles, mumps and rubella), given as a single jab

* Pneumococcal infection, third dose



3 years and 4 months, or soon after:

* MMR second jab

* Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and polio (DtaP/IPV), given as a 4-in-1 pre-school booster



Around 12-13 years:

* Cervical cancer (HPV) vaccine, which protects against cervical cancer (girls only): three jabs given within six months



Around 13-18 years:

* Diphtheria, tetanus and polio booster (Td/IPV), given as a single jab

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Jodi - posted on 03/04/2012

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That's ok, I do understand, I just misunderstood your first post :)



When my son was a baby, the Heb B wasn't on the schedule, but it was available, and because I had to have him in daycare from 6 months, I chose to vaccinate him. Where I lived at the time, and where his daycare was located, was a high immigration area, so to me it made sense.



But I have also delayed other immunisations on my kids due to ill health at the time too.



But I know what you mean about the low birth weight - my daughter was only 2.2kg.



I ended up taking the same approach as you with the chicken pox vaccine, mostly because it was so new. With my son it wasn't around, so he had the chicken pox. But with my daughter, I waited until just before she started school.

Jodi - posted on 03/03/2012

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Also, just to clarify, that in Australia, half of those who suffer from Hepatitis B were born in endemic areas in the Asia-Pacific region, not drug users. Because we have many visitors from the Asia-Pacific region (which is were the majority of chronic Hep B sufferers live) we are considered as living in an endemic region, so I can understand why they want to include it in childhood vaccines here.

Jodi - posted on 03/03/2012

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A child could get Hep B from being bitten by another child. Just a thought.

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 03/02/2012

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They're either infected at birth or they contract the disease from close contact during childhood with others who are infected.



I have to ask our health nurse why they are not giving Hep B in NS to infants....



ETA: I answered my own question.... They immunize in area's where Hep B is highly endemic, it is not here. So, they don't vaccinate until grade 7...



These include infants born of infected mothers who require hepatitis B immunoglobulin and vaccine at birth, children born into families where there is a chronic carrier, children living in communities where hepatitis B is highly endemic, and children whose families have immigrated to Canada from areas where there is a high prevalence of hepatitis B and who may be exposed to a carrier through their extended families. Most provinces have programs providing free vaccine for these high risk populations.

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Aleks - posted on 03/03/2012

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Yes Jodi, the ones at birth.... As my LO was at higher risk for developing infection. She had:

1. passed mecconium prior to being born

2. I tested positive to Group B streptococcus and they

didn't finish the 2nd course of anti-biotics during labour

which put her at risk

3. She was suspected of being a restricted growth fetus,

ie. IUGR and was deemed low-birth-weight just prior to

being born, even though she was 2940g so I said "NO"

to the immunisation at that time and a few of the mid-

wives in the hospital felt that it was a good decision

and supported me in this. .

Yes, she has had it done at her next scheduled immunisations, even though as a breastfed infant of a mother who has had the immunisation for hep b done she still probably did not "need" it done. While, her chicken pox vaccine was delayed because of her health and growth worries (numerous undiagnosed/poorly diagnosed food intollerances). I decided best to leave it when she is feeling better. And since then I just felt that she doesn't really need it. She is still breastfed so even if she does get it, her immune system will be supported. And she is young enough for it not to cause too much issues...However, looks like I may have to have her vaccinated if she doesn't catch it by the time she starts primary school. So yeah... that is just my opinion and stance on this one :-)

Jodi - posted on 03/03/2012

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Ah, you meant the one at birth. I have no idea about that - they never did that when my kids were babies.



I thought you were talking about the ones at 2 months, 4 months and 6 months. Given you mentioned you held back on the chicken pox vaccine too, I assumed you still had objections to the scheduled Hep B.

Aleks - posted on 03/03/2012

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@Jodi, you are right re hep b, however, I would have had to be friends with an intravenous drug users. I AM NOT.

And especially I find it hard to believe that a few day old newborn would be left around to be bitten - what, in hospital? Or the next few weeks before the next scheduled immunisations? Unless one is in the "high risk" category (or lives in "high risk" category areas, eg. Aboriginals are deemed high risk, unfortunatelly, together with drug users, people practicing unsafe sex, etc) Neither of this applies to me or even the greater population. So I see this as fear mongering.

Lady Heather - posted on 03/03/2012

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The thing about the infant hep B where I live is you kind of can't refuse it. Well you can I suppose, but it's combined with diphtheria and pertussis so you'd have to refuse those too. Maybe this is a highly affected area so that's why they do that?

Aleks - posted on 03/03/2012

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In Australia they give Hep B regardless if it is endemic or not. I refused the vaccine for my newborn (with the agreement of the attending midwife at the time). And I was hounded by the government to get it done!!! Mostly by brochures (frequently handed to me by medical staff and just general pressure of needing it to be done by same people) stating how risky it is for little kids in getting it!!! WTF???? All Bullshit. Hep B is spread through bodily fluids - typically intravenous drug use and sexual intercourse (true, you can get it by sharing a toothbrush too, however to share that toothbrush.....), and given that majority of of the people here in Australia that do have the disease are drug users. I think its unnecessary fear mongering type of a strategy.



I have also held back her chicken pox vaccines (and others were delayed as well, both for health reason when they were due). I do not see a reason to vaccinate little kids/babies against this (its a good vaccine if you are more than 10yo and haven't had chicken pox yet). Its not typically a deadly disease! In any case, I haven't rescheduled her chicken pox vaccine for the above reasons, and also the fact that she is still bf and I have the immunity which passes to her, so even if she did catch it, her ability to fight it off would be greatly supported by my immunity :-D and am sure that she would be able to go through it much better.



In either case... big pharma has certainly got into the governments pockets with this though....

Becky - posted on 03/02/2012

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They don't give Hep B at birth here in Alberta either, unless the parents have it or are high risk for it. Makes sense to me, since it's transmitted by exchange of bodily fluids and is not airborne. If we were going to travel overseas while they were young though, they'd get it. Along with Hep A.

Kelina - posted on 03/02/2012

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Holy crap they do! wow. Not sure why a healthy infant would need a hep B vaccine.

Lady Heather - posted on 02/29/2012

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In BC they now do Hep B shots for infants. I had mine in grade 6. I think we were the first year for that program. But now it's babies and has been for at least a few years.

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 02/29/2012

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In Nova Scotia, Canada:



2,4,6,18 months (DaPTP+Hib, Pneumo Conj.))

12 months (Men C Conj., Varicella, MMR) + Flu shot

4-6 years (MMR, DaPTP)

Grade 7 (HPV (girls), Hepatitis B, Tdap, Men C conj.)

Adult (TD (Tdap if haven’t had it in adulthood))



And rotavirus at 2,4,6 months "if" you want and you pay for it, insurance plans do not pay. I paid for it ($150 for all 3 treatments).

Jenni - posted on 02/29/2012

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I received my HB in grade 7 and it appears that's still the same. I've been wondering about that lately... we seem to give that one very late compared to other countries.

Jenni - posted on 02/29/2012

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We just had our vaccine schedule updated in 2011 for Ontario (that I know of, not sure if the other provinces had updates) to add the rotavirus and MMRV. My children never received the rotavirus vaccine.

Becky - posted on 02/29/2012

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I think Hep B is given in grade 5 here, but since I don't have a gr. 5 student yet, I could be wrong on that one.

Becky - posted on 02/29/2012

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Interesting Jenni, the schedules are different between AB and Ontario. Here, they give the Meningiccocal at 2,4, and 6 months and don't give the Rotavirus. Or at least, the Rotavirus wasn't given when my 2 year old was an infant. Maybe it is now, we'll see in April when Adam goes for his first shots.

Stifler's - posted on 02/29/2012

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My kids got theirs on schedule. I don't go around asking people if their kids are vaxed to be honest, everyone I know is normal and gets vaccinated.

Jodi - posted on 02/29/2012

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Not everyone gets their shots on schedule. Both of my kids happened to be sick when it was time for their 12 month shots, for instance, and I had to delay them. My son actually had a lot of problems with bronchial asthma, and I had to wait for about 3 months before my doctor felt he was well enough for the shots. So I'd hazard a guess that the 2 years is to allow for delayed vaccination.

Jenni - posted on 02/29/2012

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I haven't heard that Tracey. I imagine if it is a concern here, people just take precautions until 18 months.

Tracey - posted on 02/29/2012

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So if there are no jabs after 18 months why are people wanting to keep babies away from the unvaxxed until 2 years? Not criticising just curious?

Jenni - posted on 02/29/2012

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2 months:

*DTaP-IPV-HiB, Pheu-C-13, Rot-1

-Diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, polio, haemophilus influenzae type b, rotavirus (oral vaccine).



4 months

*boosters of all of the above



6 months

*boosters of DTaP-IPV-HiB



12 months

*Pneu-C-13, Men-C-C, MMR

-Pneumococcal Conjugate 13, Meningococcal Conjugate C, Measles, Mumps, Rubella



15 months

*Var

-Varicella (chicken pox)



18 months

*DTaP-IPV-HiB boosters



4-6 years

*DTaP-IPV, MMRV

-newly introduced Measles, Mumps, Rubella, Varicella all in one booster.



Grade 7

*Men-C-ACYW, HB

-Meningococcal Conjugate ACYW-135, Hep B



Grade 8

*HPV



14-16 years old (10 years after 4-6 year boosters)

*Tdap

-Diphtheria, Tetanus and Acellular Pertussis

Jodi - posted on 02/29/2012

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To add to Emma's, if you live in a region where there has been outbreaks, they are now allowing those 2 month shots at 6 weeks.



And for older kids, Year 9 (14-15) is the booster for Diptheria tetanus whooping cough.



I am not certain about the HPV, I *think* it is in Year 7, which is 12-13 yrs.



And other than that, I'm not certain, because it has all changed since my kids were little, and I guess I'll wait until the forms come home from school, then I'll know which jabs are scheduled, LOL.

Stifler's - posted on 02/29/2012

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Hold up I foind my schedule magnet. I live in Australia



Birth - Hep B



2 Months - Diptheria-tetanus-whooping cough

- hep b

- Hib

- polio

- pnuemococcal disease

- rotavirus (oral)



4 months - diptheria - tetanus - whooping cough

- hep b

- Hib

- polio

- pnuemococcal disease

- rotavirus



6 months - diptheria - tetanus - whooping cough

- hep b (or at 12 months)

- Hib

- polio

- pnuemococcal disease

- rotavirus



12 months - hep b (or at 6 months)

- Hib

- MMR

- meningococcal c



18 months - chicken pox



4 years - Diptheria tetanus whooping cough

MMR

Polio

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