voting...

Tah - posted on 11/02/2010 ( 59 moms have responded )

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i have my "i voted" sticker..how bout you.i havent even slept after getting up this am..im trying to go now, lol. I left work, baby at daycare, voted, comissary, dinner on, made breakfast for the oldest 2 who are home for election day, showered, and folded clothes....i am tired...lol



Now questions



Did you vote?



If not, do you plan on voting?



why do you feel it is important to vote in this election? or



If you are not voting, why don't you want to vote?...



o and Did children always get election day off school??? I sure didn't..lol...

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Isobel - posted on 11/02/2010

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bullshit Tah, these guys sign up to be role models...it's different to being born into money.

Politicians DO deserve to be held as role models...cause that's the life they choose...they are not born into it.

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[deleted account]

I'm not American but yes I do vote, because at the end of the day whoever is elected will affect the way the country is run. I did get the day off in primary school because our school was used as a location for counting votes =]

[deleted account]

Ah but your still making a point Jess, so if you think about it your not wasting your time really. Your saying I don't support any of these candidates!

Jess - posted on 11/06/2010

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I guess if voting was optional here in Australia I would still vote because it really is important.

On a side note, the most voted for non candidate in any Australia Election is Bart Simpson ! We are such a childish bunch. I figure, if you go all the way down to the polling booth, get your name ticket off why not make your vote count ? Your only waisting your time if you play games with the form.

ME - posted on 11/05/2010

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I voted because if you don't vote your giving them just what they want...Apathy. My husband has been out of work for a year despite applying for about 1000 jobs. I'm terrified that I will one day have to send my children to our abysmal public schools. I'm tired of my tax money going to support the destruction of people over religious disagreements and greed. I want the minimal progress that was made on health care reform to be protected...there were dozens of reasons why voting was important this year and each and every election cycle. We need an educated and engaged electorate in this country VERY badly!

Kim - posted on 11/05/2010

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When i was younger voting was done in my school's gym/cafeteria so we had 1/2 days because we couldn't stay for lunch. Our polling place isn't at the school now so my kids go all day.

Jodi - posted on 11/03/2010

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"Jodi, just to clarify - it's compulsory to go to a polling booth and get your name crossed off the list. After that you can play noughts and crosses on the voting paper if yopu want to - you've done the legal bit."



Is it? I always thought that donkey voting was illegal too, but figured they can't exactly prove it anyway, so its a bit ridiculous. I guess I never looked at the law, because I have always voted so it was irrelevant to me at which point the law was broken.



Funny thing, at the 2007 elections, my husband went to vote and they told him he wasn't on the list. WTF? So anyway, he cast an absentee vote, but we later got a letter saying he couldn't cast an absentee vote because he had already voted in another location. Again WTF??? Turns out there is another person with the same name who had changed my husband's address, etc, and then voted on his record, and so my husband's vote hadn't counted. BUT, once it all sorted out, at the end of the day, my husband got a fine for not voting!!! You know what I did with that one.......

[deleted account]

Jodi, just to clarify - it's compulsory to go to a polling booth and get your name crossed off the list. After that you can play noughts and crosses on the voting paper if yopu want to - you've done the legal bit.

Having said all that, I always vote. Not only is is my right, it's my responsibility. It's my responsibility to find out as much as I can about the candidates in my electorate and to follow what's happening in our government.

I owe it to myself and to my fellow Australians to make myself as knowledgable as possible before making a decision.

I cannot understand anyone who would abdicate their responsibility.If you choose not to vote you should shutup about the results.

[deleted account]

Ok I know I'm not American but nevermind I want to answer. I have voted in every elcetion since I was 18, I feel it is really important to vote because so many people died for us to be able to do it and politics affects everything in our lives.

I think that everyone should vote even if they spoil the ballot paper that is still registered as a vote and shows that you do not want any of the candidates. Although I have never felt the need to spoil a ballot paper yet. Sarah as for not liking your polling station you can always register for the postal vote.

We always had voting day off school and my kids will too because the school they will be attending is my polling station :-)

Isobel - posted on 11/03/2010

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You know what...and I know this never happens but here goes...you are right, I was wrong. I HATE the fact that people vote for people based on their private lives...I don't think that their private lives have anything to do with how they govern.

So there

I do think, however, that any celeb who markets their product to teenagers or younger has accepted the responsibility of being a role model.

Tah - posted on 11/03/2010

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exactly sara..those are my thoughts exactly....political views..point blank period...

Tah - posted on 11/03/2010

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@Dana..I am not saying they aren't held to a higher standard, of course their work will have a different effect on the country then a singer. SO that is not what i was saying at all. I still don't hold them to be role models to my children. I would have been in a world of crap with clinton and edwards to name a few. Now...my point was that just because i don't think that politicians run a particularly clean campaign doesn't mean i shouldn't vote and be counted....the rest we can agree to disagree on...

[deleted account]

So one politician here that is in line with my political views was also caught with a hooker, something I don't condone. But the other leading candidate didn't line up with my political views, yet is pretty moral as far as we know. What to do? I voted for the third party candidate because I couldn't bring myself to vote for either. But seriously, one of the two leading candidates (the cheater or the one that didn't share my views) will be our next senator. I felt stuck. If my hand was forced to vote for one or the other, I would have gone with my political views because politics are this person's job. That trumps what they do in their personal lives.

Isobel - posted on 11/03/2010

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sorry...the leaders of the country need to be held to a higher standard than singers...and yeah though...some of those people have a responsibility too (if you market your product to minors you accept a responsibility as a role model)...therefore Britney yes, Kanye no. Beyonce yes, Lyndsay Lohan...not anymore cause she hasn't made anything for kids in years and years.

Dana - posted on 11/03/2010

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Tah, I'm pretty sure Laura is talking about politicians being role models, not idiot celebrities born into money. Which is true, politicians do deserve to be held as role models. They are leading our states and our country. They're supposed to be speaking for all of us. It's no wonder our country is going to hell in a hand basket if the majority are people like you who don't think they should be held to a higher standard.

Tah - posted on 11/02/2010

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i call your BS TAH and raise it with BS LAURA....I used her as one example because she is a celebrity, we had this discussion on another forum and many people on here agreed that people in the public eye are not who we choose to be role models for our children..okay so paris was born into money big flipping deal...since you took her literally lets call some more names....I don't look to Kayne West, Brittany Spears, Beyonce, Goodness forbid Lindsay Lohan or anyone else to be a role model. I aim to be that. I can only control what i do. I didn't vote because i wanted to be their bestie or because I or my children looked up to them. I voted because it was my civic duty i voted for whoever was more in line with what i believe and agree on...

Jennifer - posted on 11/02/2010

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i voted today, and i always vote. if you don't vote, you've got no right to complain.



that being said, i have right to complain. our governor elect was just announced UGH *cough* douchebag *cough*

Tah - posted on 11/02/2010

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@kayle, i don't hold them to be role models anymore than i do paris hilton, that is not the point, the point is to exercise the right to vote and to have a say in the direction the country goes in and what will affect you and your children. I also believe it is our civic duty...

[deleted account]

I have voted in every single election since I turned 18 in 1991. Every local election is just as important as the major elections-the little propositions and the bigger ones. My parents were role models to us growing up on how important it is to vote, and I will pass that down to my son. It's my right to voice my vote even if the candidates I vote for don't win. At least I exercised my right instead of ignoring it. Growing up in NJ, the local schools were used as polling places so we had off. Here in AZ, some polling palces are churces or the senior center. Even some of the school libraries are closed off for election day becasue they have outside enterances and the public does not walk through the school campus.

Jane - posted on 11/02/2010

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You bet I voted and I think it's important because if I don't vote, I can't bitch and complain (LOL)!

My kids have never had election day off. They're 20 and 17 and both had school today! The 20 year old is in Arkansas and 17 year old is here with me in Colorado. So two different states and both had school. Where do they NOT have school on election day?

Erin - posted on 11/02/2010

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I agree that every vote counts. After 207 years my little small town is no longer dry!! It was such a close count 400 for it and 386 against :P

Jodi - posted on 11/02/2010

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I voted! Every vote counts...kind of like every penny counts. 100 pennies make a dollar and a few thousand (ok, a lot more than that!) votes add up to make someone a winner.
My husband doesn't vote...ever. He tries to complain about things and I shut him down everytime. If you didn't care enough to make your opinion known then...keep your mouth shut now. Didn't vote? Don't bitch about it later. It's a big pet peeve with me!

[deleted account]

I don't complain about politics... ever. If someone posts something politically related I may give my opinion on what they have posted, but that's as far as I ever go w/ political things.

[deleted account]

It wouldn't have been so bad had they realized Q-Z are not popular letters for names therefore not many people would be in that line. Oh well, the poll people are just that, people. Live and learn. Maybe the next election the letters will be better spaced!

Dana - posted on 11/02/2010

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Oh, I don't know what I was thinking, for some reason I thought it was the first letter of the first name, which wouldn't make that much sense. Not that your current system does anyhow. :|

[deleted account]

Except their last name is already chosen for them. =) But I'll keep that in mind when naming this next baby.

My husband's aunt was in line behind me and we were joking about changing our last names. We said that the wait was so long we had time to get divorces, change our names to our maiden names and switch lines. Only my maiden name starts with a P, so it wouldn't work for me. I would have still been stuck in the H-P line with a toddler with a full bladder.

Oh well, I shouldn't complain. At least I have the right to vote. =)

Dana - posted on 11/02/2010

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Sara, it should be your civic duty to name all of your children starting with letters Q-Z.

Dana - posted on 11/02/2010

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Oh that sucks. Ours is done by sections of where we live within that sectioned off area of the town to begin with (hope that makes sense). We have 4 different lines.

[deleted account]

I just voted. The polls were shutting down as I was leaving. Am I a procrastinator? Perhaps.

The H-P line was LONG while no one was in the Q-Z line. I don't know what the poll workers were thinking with that set up. When we got to the front Eliza told me she had to tee tee. Good thing I already knew exactly who I was voting for and how I was voting on the amendments. And she did NOT use it on herself. But it was a close call.

It was a regular school day here, even though the schools were used as polls.

Katherine - posted on 11/02/2010

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I voted. Iwant a say in who the new governor of MI is going to be. GOD help us. I want a say in the crazy proposals. I wanted to make difference even if I was one person. I know so cliche. My daughter did not get school off today. I don't know why.....she goes to a charter academy, they don't celebrate Halloween either....it's my first year having a chil in school so I don't know the "in's" and "out's" yet.
Anyways, I always vote, I TRY to stay on top of things in my state and country.

Stifler's - posted on 11/02/2010

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i live in australia, it's compulsory to vote here. if you don't vote, you have no right to whinge about the state of the country.

Kate CP - posted on 11/02/2010

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Kayle: We have received AT LEAST 50 phone calls in the last 10 days to vote. It's getting ridiculous! I mean I got 3 calls just today to remind me to vote democrat. I was tempted to tell them "Well, I was going to vote democrat but you assholes keep bugging the hell out of me and I may just change my damn mind!" I don't remember there being so much hoopla when it was the presidential election...what's the big deal about it NOW?!

Kayle - posted on 11/02/2010

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I chose not to vote. It's because I can not turn my tv on, check my mail, or even my email with out getting a smear ad. It's perfectly fine for you to get your name out there by doing good but when you get your name out there by "bashing" on the compition it gets a little rediculous. These politicians are supposed to be role models and this sort of smear campaign is anything but rolemodel like.

Jessica - posted on 11/02/2010

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I always vote :) As far as I'm concerned its something you should make a priority to find out who is running and what they stand for so you can vote without just randomly picking. Along the lines of what someone above said, if you don't vote, you lose the right to complain and bitch about anything you don't like going on with where you llive. We vote at the community hall, lol :)

Jodi - posted on 11/02/2010

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I'm Australian, and our beautiful democratic country has a law that it is compulsory to vote or you get fined :) "Donkey votes" were very popular at our last election I believe. Having said that, however, I choose to vote.



And just for the record, our voting is always on a Saturday, so no day off work or day of school or any of that!!

Sara - posted on 11/02/2010

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Me too, Dana. This morning when I voted there was a big sign that said "Sharing in Christ's love".

Erin - posted on 11/02/2010

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Yes, I voted. I vote in every election, it's our civic duty. I never got the day off of school, but then again I live in a small town where we voted at a senior citizens building.

Dana - posted on 11/02/2010

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I voted, I always vote. I feel like it's always important to know what's going on with your country and I want a say in who's running it.

[deleted account]

Mary, I just did it with Jacob in tow and it was painless! We were in and out (I already had a "cheat sheet" of who I was voting for written down). I voted, Jacob took my sticker so I had to ask for another one lol

Mary - posted on 11/02/2010

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I have voted in every election since I was of age. I was away at college during my first presidential election, and voted by absentee ballot. I could never imagine not voting. Many, many people before me fought long and hard for me to have this privilege, and I will not squander this gift.

I have to confess, I am dreading it this year; it is the first time I will have a toddler with me while doing so. I was 38 weeks pregnant with her during the last election - I'm afraid I will find it was easier when she was still in utero! We'll see how it goes when she wakes up from her nap...

[deleted account]

Did you vote? Yes I did :)



If not, do you plan on voting? N/A



why do you feel it is important to vote in this election? I think it's important to vote in every election, and not just the "big ones" like the Presidential election. The real stuff happens on the smaller scale and I feel like if someone doesn't vote then they have no voice. As in, I don't wanna hear anyone who didn't vote complaining. Things may not go the way you wanted them to but hey, that's why it's called a democracy.



or If you are not voting, why don't you want to vote?... N/A



o and Did children always get election day off school??? I sure didn't..lol... I never got the day off for elections when I was in school. In fact, I remember our school having mock elections for the students to teach us how to do it, complete with private little booths. The kids here aren't off from school today so it must be a regional thing. You would think it would be easier to have kids IN school on election day so that the parents can go vote without having to worry about dragging kids along. The polls are open early and late so that the teachers and school staff could vote.



Edited to add: Oh ok, I hadn't thought about using the schools for polling places. That makes sense then. Everywhere I've ever lived there were polling places set up in either government offices, churches or recreation halls. The day I voted for Obama I did it at a senior center...had to walk around their pool table to get to my booth lol

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