Wandering toddlers

Janice - posted on 04/27/2012 ( 85 moms have responded )

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So in my area, toddlers getting out of their homes and wandering away has become a big problem.

Recently in the same town there were 3 incidents and in 2 of them the toddlers were found naked and their caregivers were not aware they were gone.

http://www.news10.com/story/17412105/cas...

http://www.news10.com/story/17662011/mom...

http://www.news10.com/story/17464133/cha...



Obviously the comments on these news reports were harsh, with many people stating comments such as "first off he should be in jail..and he should never get custody or even unsupervised visitation again. this is not just a mistake a parent makes. that baby is only 2 there are so many people out there that want kids and then you have this scum who lets his 2 year old do what every they want."



However, there have been other comments stating how sneaky young children can be "Children are very sneaky, they were when i was younger and still are now. I have four children and my 5 year old had broken out of every lock i put on the doors when she was younger... She got in trouble for leaving the house and she only did it a couple times till she didn't like getting into trouble. However no one know whats going on with the parents of these two children. A child being naked at that age is not uncommon. My children refused to wear clothes. it was a constant struggle. Sometimes its not about a parent not being able to afford them or not watching them. Every circumstance is different. People can't always judge the story with out knowing the whole fact."



Just recently my almost 3 year old niece left the house with out being noticed. My SIL also has a newborn and fell asleep on the couch while they were watching cartoons. My niece knows how to unlock the door plus they have those super easy long handled doors. She left the house and walked down the driveway approximately 1/2 a block down to her grandparents house. They live in a rural area and the homes share a drive way. My SIL woke up to my niece crying as she re-entered the house because her grandparents weren't home. If they lived in the city then someone may have noticed before my SIL.



So what do you think? A simple mistake that could happen to anyone or neglectful parents?

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Jodi - posted on 04/28/2012

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Once can very easily be a mistake. My daughter was half way down our very busy street before I realised she'd learned how to open the front door. And I only realised when a man stopped out the front of our house and came to the wide open door asking if perhaps it was our toddler wandering on her own down the street. I fucking freaked. When I say our street is busy, I mean it. And it is often used as a bit of a race track. You've never seen me move so quick. But the little bugger started running full pelt the other direction the minute I called her name, and I saw her veering to go across the road in front of a car. I literally froze screaming her name. Thank GOD there was a woman out jogging who was near her, and she ran and scooped her up for me. I have honestly never forgotten the terror of that moment. I can never thank that stranger enough.

Five minutes later, I was on the phone arranging new locks on ALL our doors. I wouldn't say I was neglectful. I was a mother who had underestimated her daughter's abilities. None of the other kids had EVER attempted to escape the house like this, so it never occurred to me that she could.

Neglectful would have been doing nothing about it to prevent a reoccurrence.

Jodi - posted on 05/02/2012

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That is one reason I have a problem with the smug "I never had that issue so therefore, you must be neglectful or an idiot" comments. Because honestly, every child is different, and there are some kids, you can be super prepared for, but it turns out they are just more challenging. It's all good and fine to tell people they should be 10 steps ahead of their child because that's just common sense.....but I ask you, where is the goal post there? It is different for each child, and sometimes, you just don't realise that until one day, they just up and do something totally unpredictable.



It often isn't until that first breach that you realise what you are dealing with.



High horses hurt when you fall from them.

Lady Heather - posted on 04/27/2012

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I did it when I was a kid. My mum had three kids under five and I was kind of clever with locks. I don't think she was neglectful.



I think a lot of people just don't expect their kid to up and leave. It's easy to say your kid is never out of sight, but what if they leave early in the morning when you are in bed? You think you'll wake up. You might not. My daughter's bedroom door is steps from the front door. It would be easy for her to walk out early in the morning. I think instead of judging we should treat these things as wake up calls. Get a safety device for the door knob or whatever you need to do. Parents aren't bad people because they didn't think of that.

Janice - posted on 04/30/2012

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I'm pretty sure that most moms are smarter than their toddler(s). However, someone else said that (not direct quote) that you don't realize that your kid might just up and leave while your not looking. I think it's hard to be proactive when you don't know a problem exists.



One reason I decided to post this was because I do think that most parents just don't ever realize it will be an issue until it becomes one or they hear about it. I bet a lot of families in my area with young children will be reevaluating their door locks after what happened with the toddlers in the OP.



My SIL knew her daughter could open doors which is why she kept them locked. Sometime while my SIL was focused on the newborn, my niece figured out the locks. My SIL never planned to fall asleep either.



Also I think 20-30 years ago if you found a wandering toddler in your neighborhood, you probably knew who they belonged to and just brought them home and it wasn't considered a big deal. When discussing this so many parents don't realize its a problem but if you ask a grandma, they don't think its a big deal and then tell the handful of stories about who they know it happened to.

Cierra - posted on 04/30/2012

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i think there are ways of 'childproofing' the house or just simply letting your toddler know that this is NOT something good. my mom had multiple kids and she never had a problem with this.. it's all about how much attention you put on your kids (my opinion)

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Grace - posted on 03/13/2015

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Thank you so much Julie for posting this. I have a four year old that can get past any lock you put up. He always wanders to the neighbors house though because his aunt spends a lot of time there and he wants to see her. This neighbor does not understand wandering toddlers though and has threatened to call cps on me if it happens again. I have really been worried that I'm the only one this happens to. It is nice to hear that it happens to everyone.

Amanda - posted on 06/03/2012

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I think this is a tough one. My 4 year old can undo any lock, my 3 year old is an escape artist... but they don't get far. We lock screen doors, deadbolts, whatever we have to. Gaits, we are actually going to modify our gate so that our 4 year old for sure will not be able to undo it. My 3 year old hates clothes and it is also a struggle for us to keep them on her. In my area, a three year was recently found wandering around near a school at 6:30pm. A lady walked around the neighborhood for 2 hours looking for her parents. The police were called... it took them until 2:30am to find the parents... and they had no idea that the child was missing. Now, even with escape artist children... that is an awful long time to not have checked on your child.... children need supervision....

Julie - posted on 05/16/2012

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I think it depends on the situation. It is a common mistake though that happens to the best of parents. It has happened to me several times with various ones of my girls. Some toddlers are very smart and very quiet and all it takes is for you to be busy changing a baby's diaper or helping another child with homework or trying to make dinner or any number of things for them to take advantage of. There was no child lock that my oldest couldn't figure out at 18 months and thankfully she always snuck to the same place. I always found her in the neighbor's yard in their Little Tykes Car. She also at that age watched my husband put his razor up on top of the medicine cabinet and climbed on the toilet, into the sink and stood on tippy toes to get it and when I walked in she was sitting in the sink with blood everywhere "shaving" her face like Daddy. Amazingly no scars and she didn't cry until I screamed. Also at this age we had a very old car without child locks and she figured out how to get out of the 5 point harness on her car seat and open the car door while I was turning. She bounced out into the road and again not a scratch on her. I slammed on the brakes horrified, and after putting the car in park rushed to see if she was o.k. She was sitting in the road laughing and saying, "Whee! That was fun! Can we do it again?" while a lady ran out of her house yelling at me about why my baby wasn't in a carseat. She was a good baby, but a challenging toddler. Too smart for her own good. # 2 was colicky, but so shy and clingy I never had to worry about her leaving home without me. #3 tried to run away a lot and most of the time was thwarted by older sisters. #4 one time ran down the street after daddy as he was driving away and the neighbor around the corner brought her back. Her big thing that drove me nuts though was when she was mad she used to hide somewhere in the house and I would search everywhere and be just about ready to call the police. We found her under the crib in between things stored underneath so we couldn't see her nor did we think there would be room under there for her. She liked to nap in the linen closet under a pile of blankets. The worst was when she zipped herself inside a suitcase in our closet. She wasn't scared to be alone so you couldn't scare her with calling out you were leaving. #5 was o.k., but #6 likes to go next door to play all the time without telling me she's leaving. She's 4. Thankfully we all(neighbors) always call each other to say our child has come over to make sure we know where everyone is. No matter how many times she's been punished or talked to about the danger of leaving without me knowing she still does it. Some children are just more strong willed and sneaky. Now granted when you find a child down the street naked and it turns out the parent was passed out drunk, that's a different story.

Patricia - posted on 05/04/2012

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i know what you mean i have had 2 of these children very stressful not to mention very worrying

Jennifer - posted on 05/02/2012

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After my cousin's son escaped several times, and mostly in the middle of the night, she put locks on the door that can only be opened with a key from either side. She hates it, having lived through a fire as a child has made her very skittish, but it keeps him in. He had even learned how to turn off the alarm. He got out once sometime during the night, and they did not find him until 11 am. It is impossible to know what someone else is going through, my cousins boy is autistic with a genious IQ. I know that is rare, but other parents deal with things just as difficult.

Janice - posted on 05/02/2012

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I get the feeling Im 'in for it' with my son. I can already tell he is much different than my daughter. I think all the easy things with her will be difficult with him and vice versa!

Jodi - posted on 05/02/2012

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Oh, yes, child proof door knob covers. They didn't remain childproof in our house for very long.....Houdini figured those ones out too :\ Around the time she figure out the gates, how to drag the chairs to get to the high cupboards and locks, and how to open the child gates. Love that girl, she is creative and innovative and makes me laugh every single day with her antics.....BUT WOW she is hard work. Of our 4 kids, she is the only one we have struggled to stay a step ahead of. It does happen. You think you are well prepared for your kids (especially already having 3, one of whom is now grown), and then one like this comes along and you realise you know nothing!!

Janice - posted on 05/02/2012

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Yeah, I'm lucky too. No attempts yet by my 2.5 year-old. But we do have child-proof door knob covers on the two doors leading out. Actually this am we woke up to her crying because when she went to come out of her room she accidentally turned the lock and was locked in her room!

Patricia - posted on 05/02/2012

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mine never got out out but it wasn't through lack of trying i had 2 of the bunch same thing a boy and a girl i have 10 kids

Krista - posted on 05/02/2012

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I think if it happens once it's a simple mistake that could happen to anybody. But sometimes you hear of a toddler getting out multiple times. At that point, I'm starting to question their vigilance.

Our son hasn't made any escape attempts yet (knock on wood), but all of our exterior doors have knob locks, bolt locks, and chain locks at the very top. If needed, we would also get a chime or a bell to sound when the door is opened.

Mary - posted on 05/02/2012

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All of this talk of alarm systems, sensors, additional locks makes me even more appreciative of my dogs. If girlfriend tried to open any of our three doors that lead outside, both of them would bark as soon as they heard the door handle turn. As I said, although she is more than capable of opening any of these doors on her own, at 3.5, she has just never shown the desire to go outside on her own. She always asks first. I think I would go insane if I had to disarm Fort Knox every time I wanted to get the mail, or run out to my car for something left behind.

Patricia - posted on 05/02/2012

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so true i have a son lie that he is getting much better and most of my kids didn't like wearing clothes at that age either and they are so quick i had several locks on doors key locked windows and dowl in the windows just to keep my son in very scary

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We installed those sensor things at my mom's and mil's homes. They do not have alarm systems (which I am uncomfortable with, but they refuse), so I had the sensors installed in hopes that it would scare an intruder off should they try to enter, but they do not notify the police. They are magnet based and sound any time the magnets are not touching, but can be turned off and on with a little switch--I got the remote ones so she can control all of them from one control panel rather than having to go to each window & door to flip the switch.

Meme, that's great your police dept. is so lenient with the alarms. We only got 2 freebies and they had to be within 2 months of installation, and no one here actually ever wins if they dispute, so we don't even bother--you have to prove there was an intruder. Unfortunately, our cameras worked against us that time :P but there really isn't anything I can do--I'm not going to sleep in an unprotected house.

Jodi - posted on 05/02/2012

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Jaime, most are inside small shopping centres/malls where I live. There really aren't any small strip shopping centres here where they are stand alone shops. Maybe a few, but not many. Most other cities in Australia are older than here though, so they do. But many leave their doors open and just have those plastic strips.

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that sounds crazy, not having doors :\ what about pests, and intelligent thieves? ah the culture shock...



eta: unless you mean inside a mall but if not then weird...

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 05/02/2012

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Jaime--- Thos are exactly what I am talking about. It can be an alarm or a bell. They trip when the door opens and do not stop until the dor closes. You can also turn them off. You can get them here for a buck at the dollar store. They really work and all you have to do is change the battery.



The shops here are like Jodi's. There aren't doors that you open and close, just big open walk thru with sensors.

Jodi - posted on 05/01/2012

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Ah, I see. A lot of shops here are open fronted and don't have "doors" per se.

Stifler's - posted on 05/01/2012

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They had those at the nursing home I used to work at in the dementia unit.

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also they can be turned off without having to take them off the door :) at least the one my friend bought could be.

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Jodi, the kind I'm talking about is the same as what MeMe mentioned, it is tripped whenever the door is opened, not when someone walks through. It's especially annoying because it sounds off when the door closes too. But a friend of mine bought one for a shop he owned, and on his he was able to change the sound from an annoying high-pitched ding to a simple bell chime, which was MUCH nicer.

Janice - posted on 05/01/2012

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I think I would only get a door chime if I really thought it was going to become a problem. They are so annoying and I have a dog I let in and out all day. ;)

Jodi - posted on 05/01/2012

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Jaime, those alarms in a business are often just sensor driven, and I have watched my daughter in the past deliberately duck under the sensor. Seriously, in one store here, she figured out the point of the sensor and found a way to not make it buzz. Ah yes, children and behaviour conditioning theory. Yep, it DOES have some truth in it.

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 05/01/2012

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Actually, Jamie, here in Canada at the Dollar Store you can buy battery operated thingamajiggers that go on your door. One part goes on the casing and the other on you door. When the door (or window, you can put them on them too) gets opened it goes off and it is loud! These are a great thing as well. I have used them before. ;)

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in response to what someone said about alarms, what about those horrid things that sound an alarm when you enter or exit a business? like at my local Hastings, they have a disgusting dinging noise that hurts my ears every time i go through the door to the cafe. i hate it, but if you have a few doors to the outside and a very determined child it might be a good idea. plus it wouldn't trip some alarm to alert the police. probably a lot cheaper too.

♫ Shawnn ♪♫♫ - posted on 05/01/2012

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I'd have to say...leaning towards ALMOST neglectful parenting.



Yes, kids are ingenious! Yes, they will conquer whatever obstacle they want to.



BUT



Knowing well before I had my first that children are literal monkeys, and have big problems with being contained...I installed high locks on every outdoor access in every house we lived in until my kids were old enough. This was before my eldest was even born. And, it was the best thing we could have done. He couldn't open the locks. He couldn't CLIMB on anything to open them, because we didn't place anything near enough to do so.



Those locks didn't come off until we moved to our current home. My youngest was 4 at the time, and couldn't open the screen door because the handle was too high, so the upper door lock was unnecessary.



Did have one instance where the youngest slipped out the gate and next door. I had stepped into the bathroom for less than 30 seconds, and his dad was outdoors with him. Dad was getting a toy for them, again, back turned less than a minute, and the boy wanted to pet the cat. However, he was in his dad's range of vision the whole time, so I don't count that as an "escape"

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 04/30/2012

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Kelly---Luckily, J never did it again, but I can safely say, state of the art alarms are no rival for a toddler, they'll still open the door, it will just cost you a lot more money when they do it.



This is very true but, you have a much better idea of when they are trying to escape, thus able to catch them before they wander aimlessly for an hour or more. Which, if anything, I would prefer to be notified immediately, then not at all. ;)



We get the first 3 "accidental" alarm set offs free. Ours also notifies police, fire and ambulance. After that it costs about $350 for each alarm trip but we can also then dispute it, first you must pay the price, then fill out a crap load of paper work and submit it to the municipality. It is a long, tedious process.



Not everyone can have an alarm though. So, it is important to take other measures. As many as required. I would be devestated if I lost my kid due to them getting out. I would not want to play the "I wish" game.

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My son never escaped. I must be a much better parent than the rest of you. NOT!!!!!

I got lucky. My little house is easy to fortify--it is a single story, and I have a security system that rivals that of Alcatraz, except reversed :)
J did TRY to get out once, it was 2:43am. I know the exact moment, because when our alarm sounds, it signals the police and creates an auto report and dispatches police, fire, and ambulance from the city. Unfortunately, that also means that I get charged a fine for "false alarms" if there is no intruder--it's a lovely $400 fine EVERY SINGLE TIME. Luckily, J never did it again, but I can safely say, state of the art alarms are no rival for a toddler, they'll still open the door, it will just cost you a lot more money when they do it.

Amy - posted on 04/30/2012

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I agree it totally depends on the child!! My son (thankfully) never wanted to wander like that but I do know that my husband did. At the age of two my husband waited until his mom was in the bathroom then he dragged a chair to the front door, climbed up & unlocked it & out he went...thankfully she caught him quickly because it was just a trip to the bathroom but my MIL says he was moving as fast as he could because he knew she would be coming after him & he just wanted to explore lol

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 04/30/2012

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I have even had to take cupboards out of my kitchen. I now have 3 of 5 cupboards. I have holes where the other two go. However, I did this as soon as I seen him climb in and try to climb to the counter top. I didn't wait for him to get on the counter. However, it wasn't something I could forsee. Not all kids climb cupboards. My daughter didn't but my son does.

I agree kids are very intelligent. It is difficult to know everything that they may try and do. However being as proactive as you can be, with those things you do think of, is a good start. After that, you will have to grow as they grow. Meaning, as they show they can and are willing to do more than what you were able to proactively think of, you will need to be certain to ensure you deter the other area's they find available to them, as they present themselves.

If you are not trying to ensure they cannot redo what they already have, then to me, that is neglect. You may be lucky the first time but you may not be so lucky the second time. Unfortunatly you may not be lucky the first time either but we as parents, can only do the best we can. Being very observant is crucial. It is our responsibilty as a parent to keep our kids safe, there is no excuse for repeat offenses, with the same offense.

In regards to getting out of the house. I am sorry but that is something every parent can be proactive about. Higher dead bolts, is important. If they still get out of those, then I think it is important you keep them close to you while you are needing to do things, like laundry, washroom, dishes, etc. Other wise, put them where they cannot have free roam, until you are available again (playpen, bedroom, playroom, etc).

No one wants to be that parent that loses their child because they didn't fix what they knew was broken or there was a potential danger. Don't wait for your kid to show an interest or an ability with things that are obvious (some things are not obvious, which must be fixed as they appear). It just may be too late, then.

Sally - posted on 04/30/2012

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I agree with Mary. I think the mums who are putting people down are very smug and don't realise just what a clever child can do when they want to. I put child locks on my kitchen cupboards when mine started to get about. It took them a day to work out how to open them. I even tried tieing the doors to-gether, didn't work. All i could do was move everything dangerous on to the counters. It was a bit of a nightmare until they were old enough to understand but do you know , im proud of their problem solving skills.

Mary - posted on 04/30/2012

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Sharon, neither you nor any other of the moms on here who have shared their stories about their little escape artists are negligent idiots. You've just been graced with little ones who are determined and talented little problem-solvers.



I steadfastly maintain that those who sit in their smug little world of judgement on this one only do so because it just hasn't been an issue for them. I really don't believe it is because they are superior in their attentiveness, childproofing, or overall parenting skills. The only superior thing about them is their false sense of security that they have anticipated every possible scenario or potential pit fall. They haven't; they've merely been fortunate that (thus far), their children have lacked either the craftiness or the desire to figure these obstacles out.

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Child proofing the house is one thing, but what about the yard? I'm on 5 acres, totally fenced, and my gate was shut but my son still escaped and I only took my eyes off him for a very short time. My son could not possibly open the gate and it was too high for him to climb, but still he got out. He very cleverly had figured out he could climb under the gate, this hadn't occurred to me as it is such a small gap, does this make me negligent or as someone else put it, an idiot? Perhaps yes, if it had happened more than once. Sometimes you just can't foresee every possibility.

Mary - posted on 04/30/2012

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Natalie, I disagree that all of these parents must be idiots. Although there are probably some who are, most of them are not. They have just been blessed (and challenged) with children who are (apparently) much more intelligent, creative, and determined than yours. It's easy to be smug when you assume that all other children are just like your own, but it does sort of reveal a fair amount about you and yours.

Hope - posted on 04/30/2012

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Natalie I could be talk just like you if my first was like my second. He never goes out the front door, even when it is left open. He is now nearly 4 and just last month he went out the front door and walk maybe 2m and stopped and was just looking around, I found him there and told him off for being out the front. He told me he wasn't going away, he was just looking. First and only time he has gone out of bounds. Even then he wasn't out of bounds he hadn't even gotten to the end of the building and was not going to even try. Now if that was my eldest he would have been gone. All children are so different, you can't judge what efforts a parent s making but an incident like this.

Jodi - posted on 04/30/2012

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"Where does my reply say all mothers are idiots?"

Actually, because many mothers here had recounted the escapades of their children, your very generalised reply implied these mothers were idiots, because they certainly are not neglectful parents.

Shit happens, even when you think you are 10 steps ahead of your toddler. It just didn't happen to you. That doesn't make you better than everyone else. That just makes you lucky that your kids were not Houdini incarnates, or that your kids didn't work out those childproof locks, or that your kids didn't work out how to get through that child gate, or that your child hadn't figured out how to stack books to reach the locks, or drag a chair, or your older children didn't accidentally leave something out or unlocked, or that....... do I need to go on?

Hope - posted on 04/29/2012

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Natalie there is a big difference between debating and name calling. I do not appreciate being called an idiot. I think you may need to read up on how to debate before making any further comments.

Natalie - posted on 04/29/2012

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Where does my reply say all mothers are idiots? They have to think ahead and know that at some point their kids will be able to do things that they can't do right now. Most of us don't wait to put in cabinet locks until after the baby drinks the drano, we either do it when we are pregnant or shortly after the baby is born. Why should we wait for the last, possibly deadly, second to make sure they can't get out the door when we're doing something else?

Natalie - posted on 04/29/2012

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The name of the community is "Debating Mums", not "Mothers who all Think Alike and Support Ridiculous Ideas." Sorry. We're allowed to have differing opinions. :)

Jodi - posted on 04/29/2012

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Must be wonderful to be so thoroughly perfect and have children who were so predcitable.

Jodi - posted on 04/29/2012

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Ok, so we are idiots then. Thanks Natalie. I hope your house isn't made of glass.

Natalie - posted on 04/29/2012

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If it's not neglect, then the parents are idiots. My daughter and son also figured how to open the door at an early age. Did I wait for them to escape? No, I put another lock at the top of the door. You just have to be 10% more intelligent than a 2 yr old.

Sally - posted on 04/29/2012

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I think its agreed in most cases it not neglect . Its a case of not being aware of what your child can do and most of us put us much as we can in place to stop it happening again but if you got a clever kid that doesn't always work. My daughter put a lock on the kitchen cos her daugther was getting it to it in the middle of the night. My grandaughter put wooden train tracks to-gether to reach the lock and slid it. I think most of us would miss our kid in min but the ones that go ages without noticing, thats neglrct

Jodi - posted on 04/29/2012

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"" I wouldn't say I was neglectful. I was a mother who had underestimated her daughter's abilities."

I agree with this statement wholeheartedly, but would add desire and determination to this list. "

Very true, Mary....very true.

Bonnie - posted on 04/29/2012

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It happens. We as parents are often so tired and so busy. I was doing daycare through an agency not too long ago and there was a notice given to me by the agency about another provider. Somehow a two year old got out of his highchair, fiddled trying to get his shoes on. Failed at that and decided to leave them there. Opened the front door and wandered. He was found later on at a daycare facility, so he had walked quite a bit. No idea where the provider was all that time.



If you have a wanderer or a child that has tried to escape more than once, those latch type locks that you put at the top of the door are really helpful.

Mary - posted on 04/29/2012

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" I wouldn't say I was neglectful. I was a mother who had underestimated her daughter's abilities."



I agree with this statement wholeheartedly, but would add desire and determination to this list. My daughter has had the ability to open all of our doors for quite some time now. However, she has never shown the desire to do so on her own. She frequently does get up in the middle of the night, but all she ever does is come into our bedroom. Her latest "trick" is to drag her bedding into our room, and make a "nest" on the floor with pillows and blankets. She does this silently in the dark, and the only ones aware of her little stealth operation are my dogs, who are just as silent and sneaky about joining her little party. Many are the mornings I wake up to the three of them, sound asleep, all snuggled together on the floor in her comfy creation.



I realize that I am (so far) just damned lucky. If she were some other kid - like my nephew - she would be out in the court riding her bike at 2am. In no way would I ever describe my sister as "negligent"; in fact, she's probably a borderline helicopter parent. My nephew, however, was much like Hope's son. Even with the most vigilant of parents, that little Houdini could and would find a way to get out with even a 30 second window of opportunity. Chances are he would have been buck-naked at the time as well.



My sister and BIL did reach a point with him where they were forced to lock him in his room at night. The had secured all the doors, including installing an (expensive) alarm system, so that he couldn't get outside without their awareness. However, that did not preclude him from wreaking all sorts of havoc indoors in the wee hours of the morning while everyone else was sleeping.



Funny thing is, there are plenty of moms on here and in RL who would be absolutely appalled and aghast at a parent locking their kid in their bedroom at night, and call that action everything just short of abusive. (we've had threads about just this topic on here in the past). Of course, I'm pretty sure that those who think that way have never had a kid with whom this was an issue.



It's entirely possibly that the toddlers in the OP had negligent parents. It's also just as likely that these occurrences were that first time when an otherwise stellar parent has become aware that they have a little escape artist on their hands, and now need to lock their home down like a penitentiary.

Hope - posted on 04/28/2012

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My eldest gave me grief. He was a little Houdini. He escaped more times then I can remember. But every-time he escaped we made efforts to fix that problem. But he was so determined he would find another way out. He figured out how to get out the front door so we put a latch on up high, he discovered how to climb the side gates so my husband made then higher, but he just climbed higher so we had to cover them with shade cloth. Then he got stuck half way under the back fence, we filled the hole in so he couldn't get under. He figured how to open the back door and one morning we woke to him out the back yard. We put a bolt at the top of the door.
My child picked up head lice from daycare and I was treating our hair, I did his hair first, but when I was doing my hair, even after all the above precautions he got out of the house and there was a know at the door, the man from next door was bring him home.

There were countless time my child escaped and countless efforts we made to fix the problem.
Was I a neglectful mother because my child was so determined.

Stifler's - posted on 04/28/2012

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We have a gate on the rock area side where the washing line is and Logan just figured out how to open that and get out the front the other day . Have to buy a padlock for it.

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