Would you fake your address to get your daughter/son into a better school?

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Krista - posted on 09/05/2011

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But let's all face it- none of us want our children going to an under achieving, failing school riddled with crime and poverty. We all want great opportunities for our kids. None of us would willingly send our child off to a school with deplorable reading and math scores and a low percentage of teacher retention if a better opportunity was around the corner, down the street, or across town

It's just so sad and wrong that any schools like that even exist in the first place. We talk about people and how they should work to lift themselves out of poverty. But how in the hell do you expect some kid to lift himself out of poverty when his school doesn't even provide textbooks, and the kid is too busy trying to avoid being stabbed to worry about studying?

I just wish that our governments would put even 1/10th of the energy and funding into schools that they put into our military. Schools SHOULD be a safe place where ALL children have the chance to learn what they need to know in order to qualify for post-secondary education (or a job, if that's the path they choose). But there are so many kids who struggle against so many obstacles, just to make it to 10th grade, let alone graduation and college. I'm not saying that the world is fair, but like I said earlier, there is something very wrong with our society's moral fabric when we so easily look the other way while young children are being screwed out of their future as soon as they're born.

I don't know...I guess I just get tired when I hear about people complaining about how our society has no morals anymore, and they're always talking about bedroom behaviour. But nobody's talking about how incredibly immoral and unethical it is for a rich society like ours to not take care of its children.

Krista - posted on 09/04/2011

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I wouldn't do that, but I can see why a parent would. You want your kid to have the best chance possible, and it's not as easy as saying, "just move". Those schools are likely in neighbourhoods where the housing costs are way out of reach of the average working family.

I just think it's flat-out immoral for a society to have so much discrepancy in the quality of its schools. All children should be given an equal opportunity at life. And if your parents are poor, resulting in you having no choice but to go to some crappy, low-quality school, then you're at a major disadvantage right from the start. It is just flat-out evil, how our societies fail children.

Stifler's - posted on 09/04/2011

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I wouldn't feel any guilt. I pay tax to the state of Queensland not the south side of Emerald.

[deleted account]

Honestly, if this woman really was training to be a teacher, why couldn't she just homeschool her kid? I get wanting your kid to go to a different school, but move there. She had other options.

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Michelle - posted on 09/07/2011

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Yes i would if that school was relly going to benefit my child..im ashamed to say that i would but nothing is more important tham my child:)

[deleted account]

I also think the lottery system is ridiculous. In the city just south of us, most schools are crap. But there are magnet schools and gifted schools that kids can get tested into to. Fine...if you can pass a test. There are also lottery schools that are excellent. But if you can't pass a test and you don't get drawn out of the lottery...then what?!

Katherine - posted on 09/06/2011

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And like in MY situation they only have the 12 houses zoned for a different school system. It's ridiculous.

Becky - posted on 09/06/2011

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I don't think I could do it, it would feel dishonest to me. However, I wouldn't send my child to a school that I felt was sub-standard just because it was the designated school for our neighborhood. I would get around it by putting them into an alternate language program, or arts program or something like that, where they had to go to a different school. For example, in the neighborhood where our kids will go to school, there are 2 elementary schools. The one they will go to is an English only school. I haven't researched it yet, but will definitely be doing so before they start school! The other school in the neighborhood has a German-bilingual program. If we decide that we don't like the school they will be going to, we will put them into the German-bilingual program at the other school, and if we decide we want them in that program, they can't deny us, even though it's not our designated school. I'm considering that anyway, because their cousins are in that program and because it certainly won't hurt them to learn a second language!
I do agree with Krista that it is shameful that this is even an issue. Every child should be entitled to receive the same level of education. It shouldn't be dependent on the area they live in or their parents' socio-economic status!

~♥Little Miss - posted on 09/05/2011

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Oh, I see what you mean now. I had to read it like 3 times! LOL! NOW I get it!

Katherine - posted on 09/05/2011

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Somehow siblings have gotten separated because of the lottery. I guess one gets in, the other doesn't. When they first apply. So then the other one has to go to a different school. My other daughter is also grandfathered in. I guess I made myself really unclear lol.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 09/05/2011

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That is odd Katherine. My son goes to a charter school This is the first year it is open, only goes to 2nd grade right now. His bus ride would be 1 1/2 hours also. But my daughter has a place there. No lottery for her BECAUSE she is a sibling.

Katherine - posted on 09/05/2011

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My daughter goes to a charter school and it doesn't matter where you live. The thing is is that sometimes if your child has a sibling later on they may not get into the same school because it's a lottery. So that's the only thing about that. Otherwise I really can see why she did this.

My daughter was supposed to go to a different school district because of zoning. Only 12 houses in the entire neighborhood go to this district because of zoning. Isn't that crap? She would have been on the bus an hour and a half a day. That's why we decided to go with the charter.

Rosie - posted on 09/05/2011

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i can see why she did it. i don't have to worry about that around here. all the schools are awesome. even in the major city next to me, the poor kids and the wealthiest kids still attend a GREAT school. for some reason my city has a very distinct place where rich people live, and you cross 19th st. and you are in the heart of the ghetto, but it's still the same school district. it's kinda neat how that worked out for the poor people there. :)

JuLeah - posted on 09/05/2011

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Things here keep geting rezoned do to budget cuts. So a kid can start at one school, and her younger sib a year later will be in a school across town. Both kids will need to be dropped and picked up at the same time, but the schools will be across town. So, yah ... many many folks do that here

America3437 - posted on 09/05/2011

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This is the thing... This is America and the land of opportunity and our educators should really push this issue! It should not matter where you live or what you drive when it comes to education all children desreve the same public education and all schools should be funded equally!!! We wonder where our children learn that one is better than the other mentallity and then we look at the difference in education from school to school and you see the answer!! I relize some schools are bigger than others and require more funding but to set boundries on what school you send your child due to better education or safer enviroment is rediclious and the education system in America is the responsibilty of all parents to change!! All schools should be safe for our kids and as parents we do what we have to, to keep our kids safe so how can America fine her for that!

Becky - posted on 09/05/2011

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I've never really thought about it. In our area we have open enrollment. I can enroll my daughter in any school in the district. I choose to enroll her were she is currently because it was the closest to the house we were trying to buy at the time. Had the deal fallen though, she could still attend that school, but it didn't. Over all the public grade schools in the areas are all fairly comparable.

My cousin has used the open enrollment because she has joint custody with her oldest and there was a dispute over which school her daughter should attend when she moved last year. After a much heated debate, they were able to keep her at the same school she had been attending although it was not at all close to either her Mom or her Dad's houses.

When ever I have relocated, the school district has always been a factor and something I have looked into. There are some areas around here (outside the city I'm in) I would NEVER move too, not just because the neighborhood is less than great, but because the school district is equally deplorable. I want my daughter to have a good education & if that means I have to spend more on housing in a decent neighborhood & school district, so be it! I can't afford private school, so I paid attention to the public schools while we were looking at houses years ago.

[deleted account]

I understand why parents fake an address, but it's something we do not have to do here. Open Enrollment allows me to send my son to an out-of-district school the next town over. The problem with the parent is that she knew she was illegally enrolling her kids, and when confronted, did not pay up any tuition, back pay, compensation, taxes, etc. She was simply caught, and wouldn't work with the school. But let's all face it- none of us want our children going to an under achieving, failing school riddled with crime and poverty. We all want great opportunities for our kids. None of us would willingly send our child off to a school with deplorable reading and math scores and a low percentage of teacher retention if a better opportunity was around the corner, down the street, or across town. Like I said above, I am glad I send my son out of district because the district where I live, and taught for 9 years, has a lot of problems. I needed a stable environment for him and he has thrived. As for me, I jumped ship 2 years ago to a better district.

Isobel - posted on 09/04/2011

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That's it though, right? It's not exactly a school's "choice" in how they spend their money. In schools where the parents have more money you can simply send a list home of things the kids should bring to school, you have lots of fund raisers and raise tons of money for any extras you want. The poorer schools not only have to provide the basic school supplies but also food and after-school programs for kids whose parents have to work.

We have what's called here "private schools within the public system" and my kids happen to be in one. They raise hundreds of thousands of dollars per year...in fact I remember seeing on a flyer outside the office a layout of how the school's donated funds are being invested in case of any question of impropriety.

I gotta go with Krista on this one, even in the communist country of Canada, it's sad to see that kids are being denied what I see as a basic need and right because their parents are poor.

[deleted account]

See, here, lines are not drawn that way. The schools I did my student teaching at were 99% free and reduced lunch...poverty. Those students generally do not have parents that are educated...therefore are not going to volunteer because education is not valued. Violence is an issue, truancy is an issue, children not being on grade level is an issue, finding and keeping good teachers is an issue. I would be more than willing to TEACH or volunteer in those schools (once I'm not needed as a SAHM)...but no way in hell will my children attend those schools.

[deleted account]

No. In my state, the parents are what make the school a good or bad school. Our property taxes are split evenly throughout all of the schools in the county, so they ALL get the SAME amount of tax dollars per student--the difference is the way they spend it.



The lines are there for a reason, they prevent over population and evenly distribute lower income students so you don't have one school with 90% of the kids below the poverty line and another school with only 10% living below the poverty line. They don't draw them willy nilly, and you don't always end up at the school closest to you, but you end up in the school that you need to be in based on all of those factors and more combined.



If you do not like the school your child is assigned to, go in and change it. Organize a fundraiser, head up a student publishing center, volunteer for a SIC committee (If schools do not use grant $$ they loose it, and if no one sits the SIC that money is GONE). If you don't want to go in and change the school, then move to a district you are happier with and depend on the parents who are already there to do it for you because I promise, the school you like is better because of the parent involvement.

[deleted account]

I'll say it. I would in a heartbeat. I live in a wonderful school district, but the surrounding districts are crap. The district where I live is insanely expensive and taxes are high. We are very fortunate to live here. So just moving here is not an option for so many people. Many parents work and homeschooling is not an option.

However, very few people actually get away with faking an address. If anything is suspicious, a school authority will come to that address and ask to see the child's room and closet, etc.

Minnie - posted on 09/04/2011

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No. I would homeschool, and am.



I briefly considered it,but not in seriousness, because there was a chance she would have had to attend public school and where we were living (we just moved to a better area) the school system is horrible.

Isobel - posted on 09/04/2011

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I used by boyfriend's address before we moved in together...and it's going to sound ridiculous but it was to go to the school that was closest to me...and because the other school was in a FAR wealthier neighbourhood and I didn't want to have to explain to my children EVERY holiday why we were the only people who weren't going to the chalet in Whistler or Aspen for the Holidays.

And I would lend somebody else my address if they needed it...the zoning in the city is a mess.

I had a public school directly across the street from my building but because I lived on the west side of the street, the school in my zone was a subway and a streetcar trip away.

[deleted account]

When I registered the girls for K... we lived in that district.... even though I knew we were moving in the next month.

The guilt got to me though, so I confessed to the PCNC (parent coordinator person) who was a good aquaintance of mine after a couple months of the girls being in K... Then I confessed to the principal (another aquaintance of mine). They were ok w/ it and the girls have continued to go to that school throughout their entire elementary years even though we've not lived in that district again. I just had to fill out a geographical exemption.

So, I never faked the address.... just didn't provide all the information that I knew. With all the guilt I had over that... nope, I wouldn't lie about the address.

Lady Heather - posted on 09/04/2011

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I wouldn't, but that's easy to say because there's no need where I live. I can certainly see why some parents would. It's all well and good to tell people to move if they don't like their school, but in a lot of cases we're talking pretty low income families that are stuck with the bad schools. They can't just up and move to a fancy new neighbourhood. I totally understand the desperation that comes from wanting to give your kid a better chance than you had. It's a shame there are such sweeping differences in schools in the first place.

Katherine - posted on 09/04/2011

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I've heard of parents doing it all the time and not getting caught. I feel it is illegal on one hand but on the other I'm torn about the mom/dad getting them into the school they want.

Jodi - posted on 09/04/2011

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Where I live it is really easy to get your kid into a school in a different area, so it has never been an issue for anyone I know. Maybe it is because we do have a lot of good schools in our area, with good reputations, so one school is not being loaded up. My son used to go to an out of area school years ago because it was a highly reputable school, and it used to be very close to where I worked (so the convenience factor was huge too). I had no trouble getting him in, and was not required to live in area at all.

My kids go to Catholic schools now, so it isn't an issue for us at all.

Kathy - posted on 09/04/2011

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No. It's illegal. Plain and simple. Why lie? It's cheating. If you don't want your kids in a specific school then move.

Stifler's - posted on 09/04/2011

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We are thinking about letting our friends say they live with us so their kid can go to the state school down the street from us. Then if anyone asks they moved a few weeks after school started. The state school on their side of town has a bad reputation and private school is too expensive and pointless until high school around here.

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