How to discipline??

Christina - posted on 10/28/2010 ( 44 moms have responded )

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My son is into EVERYTHING!! I have no pictures on my shelfs, no movies in my TV cabinet, nothing in my coffee table drawer..etc..I had to put everything away because he just won't stop. I understand that he is that age, but I have also heard that some people's kids just listen to "NO". HAHAHAHA My son thinks it's a joke!! He gives me this (while Soooooo cute) naughty grin. I don't smile when I am telling him 'no' and I don't give in. He is very active and has been walking since he was 10 months. I just don't know how to discpline him!! I have swatted his hand a couple of times for trying to pull plugs out of the wall, but I feel soooooooooooooooo guilty. I need some tips, advice, something to get him to listen at least SOME of the time!! Even when i swatted his hand he didn't care, Ihave tried to go to his level and have eye contact and firmly tell him 'no', but he turns right around and does it again. HELP :)

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Linley - posted on 11/06/2010

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I feel so blessed to have a pretty easy going daughter. At times she gets out of hand, she loves to take books off the shelf too! When she does do something naughty, she responds well to redirecting. I tell her, "It's not ok to take books off shelves, but it is ok to take blocks out of the bin." And then take her to the block bin. It's takes a lot of patience on my part but she everytime she walks past the book shelf I can see the wheels in her head turning and today she ran straight to the block bin! I was pretty excited. The girl the I nanny, 19mo, is a little bit harder to redirect, but she responds well to 2 minute timeouts alone in her crib! I hope you all get some good ideas, we mom's can use ask much support we can get!

Lisa - posted on 11/03/2010

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Yay! There are more like us than I thought! I think, probably because we only have one child, we tend not to know what's fairly common, so we think it must only be us. I think we all should start our own sub-group here called "The Hurricane Society." My daughter (17 months yesterday) is exactly like all of your children! Thinks it's hysterical when we tell her not to do or touch something. Gives that little mischievous grin right before she runs off to do something like try to put my cellphone in the dog's water bowl, pull out a handful of dirt from one of our plants, etc. You all have been there, I know. Well, I read something recently that suggested that rather than continuously saying "no" (they claim that that's where toddlers learn to start saying no back to us), that we should try to redirect them to something that is acceptable for them to do. For example, instead of saying, "No, don't bite the dog's tail," say "Here...let's get something better for you to chew on" and give them a teether. Or instead of saying, "No, you can't climb on the coffee table," tell them, "Here, you can jump on the bed!" (That was an actual example. I'm not advocating jumping on beds. I'm still trying to figure out an appropriate redirect because my daughter has now decided it's great fun to climb onto the coffee table.) We're just starting this, so I'm not quite sure how well it's going to work at this age, but I can tell you that I'm already worn out by all the redirecting I'm having to do! :) So, good luck everyone!

Jennifer - posted on 10/30/2010

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I understand how you're feeling, my daughter is quite the handful too, but I think the thing that has worked the best is time outs. They are definitely NOT too young for time-outs (we started around 1 year) and they seem to help. If she does something that I tell her "no" to, and she does it again, she gets a timeout on the floor for one minute. I have to make sure that I dont' give her any attention while she's in timeout or it has no effect. If she does the same thing again, she goes in her pack-n-play for 5 minutes, no toys or anything fun to play with (she hates it, but it seems to have helped a lot). I also bought a digital timer which I set to make sure that I remain consistent with the length of time (she shouldn't have to sit in there longer just because I had a bad day at work!). Anyway, she knows EXACTLY what the "timeout timer" is, as soon as I pull it out, she begins crying (mostly for the attention!).



I also decided to do some research on books that might help me figure out what to do once the timeout plan no longer helps. The one I'm reading now is called "Setting Limits with your strong willed child" by Robert J. Mackenzie. I can't say yet if what I'm reading will help, but this book had great reviews. I hope this helps!

Allison - posted on 10/30/2010

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YAY!! More people in the same boat as me!!! This is my second son and my first one was NEVER like this at all. Anything he can get his hands on goes in the toilet (one house phone, one cell, & a TV remote have been replaced already) shoes, blocks, sippy cups whatever! We can't leave drinks any place where he can reach them because he spills them (on purpose). Now he has learned to climb on the kitchen table! He shredded my mums that were on the table while I was putting his brothers shoes on in the living room. He loves getting into the garbage can just to throw whatever he can grab onto the floor. He dumps, throws, and just basically enjoys making messes! And like all of yours he is stubborn and thinks discipline is a joke! He laughs, smiles, or just flat out tells me NO. What I have started doing recently is when I have had enough, he goes in his pack and play! I never even used the pack and play with my older son and THANK GOD I kept it for this one! I put his toys in with him (which all usually end up flying out) and a blanket and he will play in there with no worries of anything he can damage. I can actually get things done! I felt guilty at first but, it's better then a lot of alternatives!! Now my 4 year old likes to go in with him and they both play in there! Works for me!!

Darby - posted on 10/29/2010

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Our son is like yours! We have tried adding different ways to say, "No," like "Don't," Do not," "Stop," etc. We have had a little bit of success by switching to different words, yet in that same harsh tone of voice indicating that we mean business. Swatting at our son's hand has done nothing; he gives us the ornery grin as well. Physically moving him to another place, even if only a few feet away, helps quite a bit to reinforce the harsh tone/words we use.
Good luck and be sure to post any other magic tips/tricks you try out!

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Ashley - posted on 01/10/2011

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Try using other words then just "no" My sone will actually tell me no back because I have used the word so much. Telling him "don't" helps. Time out works the best for me. When he doesn't listen I put him in the corner. he cries but I just let him sit there until her calms down and is ready to have a talk. I always talk with him after the time out to let him know why he was put on time out in the first place. I found the crib or play pen is not a good place for time out because then when putting him there for bed he thinks he is in trouble. A chair in the corner of on the floor in the coner facing the wall works good for me.

Jodie - posted on 01/08/2011

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I was amazed to read most everything sounds as if it could be my son as well. He will be 19 months on the 11th and I really thought he was too young for time out. I don't think I should use his pack and play because if I put him in there for a non-time-out he will get confused. But I will certainly give it a try. My biggest issue is in public, he will not stay with me. He is off running and could care less if I change direction or have things he normally would want. I see so many parents and there little ones stop if they get too far. Any suggestions on how to teach this...or does it come with age?

Naomi - posted on 12/21/2010

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I too have found time out works best so far. I feel my son is too young to understand spanks, and he is very social and HATES being isolated. so I tell him once what will happen if he is doing something he shouldn't, and then if he persists, he goes into his crib for 1 minute. He screams the whole time, but doesn't return to the behaviour (at least that day) if he is doing a tantrum scream, I wait until he is a little quieter before going back in the room so I am not rewarding the screaming. I do also pick my battles a lot, we have lots of baby proofing and generally only discipline for danger issues. For example, he can climb up to sit on a kitchen chair since he can do it with ease, and it doesn't hurt anything, but if he tries to get onto the kitchen table he gets a time out. So far, this is working. I'm not looking forward to the age of greater defiance, and what happens when he might treat another child badly one day tho :(

Colleen - posted on 12/21/2010

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Are you sure you are not talking about my son. He is the exact same, he too walked at 10 months, and he is into everything, and constantly moving from the time he gets up to the time he goes to sleep, minus a 2 hour nap. I have tried to disiplin him, but feel bad because I feel like I'm always saying No, but he does not respond. I have to physically move him away from what ever he is getting into,and I have to take him to a different room, and give him other things, because he thinks it's funny. I also could use seme sound advise.

Amanda - posted on 12/17/2010

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my daughter is 18mths old, she doesnt get into a lot of things, but there are some things she is constantly trying to do that she knows she isn't suppose to. No, use to work, but lately its like it goes in one year and out the other, or like it doesnt even mean anything to her anymore. Saying, No, thats not for babies, and then showing her something that is for babies seems to work...sometimes. I use to tap her on the hand, but that didn't do anything. I've found the most helpful thing was to say no, not for babies the 1st time, the 2nd time, take her away from it, 3rd time, i'd give her a 1min time out either in the kitchen on a chair(if thats where i am) or on the couch beside with the tv turned off. i'd get down to her level and explain to her why she was sitting there in simple terms, tell her she needs to stay there for 1 min and that mommy will let her know when she can come done. the first few times she kept trying to leave, now she knows to sit there and it gives her time to calm down, if she is upset from me telling her no, and it allows her to forget about what she was doing. also lets me stay calm and not get frustrated with her. so far, time outs have been working really well

Kristin - posted on 12/05/2010

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I would stop saying no as much as possible. Sometimes kids can go "deaf to it" if it's overused. Prevention is 75% of the battle. Babyproof to the extreme. Close bedroom doors, switch around cabinets (i.e. tupperware on the bottom, glass up top, etc.)

Distraction is also huge. My son is starting to throw temper tantrums alot so I just leave the room and start playing with his blocks or reading a book loudly and eventually he comes out and joins me.

I would also highly suggest getting him to be your "helper." My guy loves to close doors for me, watch me cook, and if I have a basket, he can put toys into it for me.

I also try to schedule certain chores while he's "contained and entertained" such as loading the dishwasher.

If you need to, you can say no and put him in timeout for a minute. I put my son in his crib the other day for the first time because he AND I needed a break from each other. He ended up just being really tired and fell asleep for a short cat nap.

When all else fails, hire a babysitter for an hour or so and go out for a walk or something. Sometimes you just need a break! I can handle a lot more stress when I have a little respite. If you can't do that, pack him up in the stroller and take a walk together. The distraction and exercise will do you both good. =)

Hope that helps!

Monique - posted on 12/01/2010

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We had this same problem with my 17 month old, after watching "supernanny" I decided to try her time out methods and surprisingly my son has responded fairly well. Now when I tell him to stop touching or your going to time out? He either stops and walks away or he does it and then gets a minute time out. The other day my son was dragging a guitar across the floor and I told him if he didn't stop he would go to time out, he put down the guitar and went and sat himself in timeout. Anyhow this method has been very efective.

Sian - posted on 11/15/2010

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my daughter can be a right little madam if she does something she is not meant to be doing i tell her no. but if she continues to do it she gets a warning and i say if you do it one more time you will sit on your bottom. and that normally does the trick. if she is in a funny mood she wont listen to that and she gets sat on her bottom and told that she will stay there for a minute, she doesnt normally but if she does get up she gets put back without a word from me until she stays there for the full minute then when the minute is up i stand her up and get down to eye level and tell her what she did was not right and that she has to say sorry so she gives me a kiss and cuddle. it works wonders for me she is rarely naughty so its not often i have to do it. hope it helps.

Jessica - posted on 11/14/2010

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Every kid and toddler is diffrent, so they all respond to diffrent punishments. when my daughter is bad sometimes i tap her hand... other times if for example it is one thing after another i will simply tell her shes a bad girl and put her in the playpen. it usually works for her.. until she tries to climb out (shes gotten out several times so i have to watch her ) even if its not quiet cuz shes not happy i can try to relax

Samantha - posted on 11/13/2010

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I swat my daughter when she does something dangerous like plugging in the vacuum cleaner. Its very dangerous, and it CANNOT happen. Other than that, if she hits (rarely, and she picked it up from another girl at daycare, we've been swating since she was crawling, and she just learned to hit a month ago after a new baby came), or if I tell her "no" 3 times, and she wont listen, or is throwing a temper tantrum, etc, I put her in time out, and I have since her 1st Bday. She sits with her back against the wall, with nothing to distract her, for 1 minute (1 minute for each year old they are), or until she stops throwing her tantrum. If her tantrum persists after 5 or so minutes, I sit down with her, and talk to her, hug, cuddle, etc, and get her to calm down, hen made her listen while I told her what she did wrong, why she needed to stop, and that it was ok and I love her. There is nothing wrong with having structure with a child, as long as you arent to firm, and you still allow play and comfort. Sorry, Im not trying to "preach" but I get upset when I hear so many parents say its wrong to let a child do what they want because the parent doesnt want to hear them cry. Crying, laughing, and grunting is their only way of communication, and they cant learn effective communication unless they try out all of the options. Crying allows them to express anger, discomfort, and most of their "I'm unhappy" feelings, and sometimes they are just grumpy, like all human beings get.

[deleted account]

My son is the SAME why. I don't believe in 'swatting' but that is my personal choice. My son's father swatted his hand ONCE and now he hits everyone when he doesn't like what they are doing to him and tells THEM no and points his little finger lol.
My mom gave me the best advice. She told me to hold my child's hands when he his touching this he isn't suppose to, he fusses for a minute and then I explain to him (even tho he his little) that he can't touch the things he wants to...

Tina - posted on 11/11/2010

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Hi, my daughter is now 17 months and can be very mischievous lol i have now got a time out chair for her and leave her there for 1 minute and it works! Try it or put them on a pillow on the floor and tell them to stay in a firm tone! xx

Alicia - posted on 11/10/2010

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Well, my oldest is a 9 yr old boy, and my youngest is a 17 month old little girl. We have just started disciplining my little girl by smacking her hand and redirecting her to something other than what she got in trouble for. I don't remember my son ever being as curious about things as my little girl. The long and the short of it is, my son no longer has to be disciplined, or very rarely do we have to punish him. I contribute that to consistancy, redirction after bad behavior, lots of patients, and a lot of prayer. When you are discipling your child, you can not smile because they take that as you thinking the behavior as funny. I know, that is difficult sometimes because, sometimes, what they do, or how they react to the discipline may seem a little funny. On the other hand, it is difficult to discipline a child because you love them, but you have to do it, and do it consistantly. It creates an atmosphere of stability which all children need. It makes them feel safe, I think. Consistancy, redirection, patients, not acting as if bad behavior is funny or cute...I think those are the things that get you to the point of where my oldest is. All we have to do with him when there is undesirable behavior is point out that the behavior is not exceptable and he corrects himself. Hopefully, things will go as well with my youngest. Only time will tell, as far as she is concerned. I hope this is helpful. Good luck and God Bless!

Christina - posted on 11/10/2010

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girl i am a toddler teacher have worked in child care for over 5 years and i can handle any other child break them from bad habits and guess what my child doesn't listen to me he throws everything when he doesn't get his way he lays on the ground and does this fake cry i try everything i use on my kids in my class and it doens't work good luck i know its hard

Tiffany - posted on 11/10/2010

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WOW! I can't believe the amount of moms going through this with their sons too! I have my 4 yr. old daughter who was NOTHING like my crazy little man! He's into everything plugs in the walls, drawers..I can't even begin to name them, oh and don't dare leave the bathroom door open because something WILL be thrown into the toilet! Ugggh! I guess I should have taken my mother-inlaw more serious when she says.."It's a boy thing!" (a mother of 3 boys!) Well..no help, but another mother relieved I'm not alone :)

Gabriela - posted on 11/10/2010

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It seems that I'm a lucky mum with our little boy. He is a very active little man who discovers a new world at the time being. He loves to pull out all the CDs or to empty the clothes pin box several times a day. However, he listens to my NOs. My husband and I are very strict on what he is allowed to do and what not. I will raise my voice a bit and be quite stubborn in not allowing him to do certain things (for example play with the stereo/radio, open my drawers with my jewelry, etc.). So far, it worked very well!

Chloe - posted on 11/09/2010

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He sounds EXACTLY like my son. Nothing seems to work. Let me know if you find anyhting that does. At least he is not the only one cos it sure seems like it.

Kirsty - posted on 11/09/2010

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Our 16 mth old lil' dude is exactly the same as the examples cited here. I tried the "No" and redirecting but the lil devil just keeps going back..tried distraction but that only lasts for a minute or two..tried slapping his hand and it was a 50/50 chance it whether it would work or not..but I feel bad when I do that..so I am trying time-outs now..When I catch him doing something he knows he shouldn't be (i.e.ripping out the heat register vents) I tell him "Mommy said No" the first time.. if he goes for it again I pick him up and sit him on the floor repeat the phrase "Mommy said No" and make him sit - though squirming and fussing - till he stops. Can sometimes be up to a minute. It seems to be working. He is starting to connect "time out" with something he doesn't like doing and he looks like he is thinking twice before doing something Mommy has said No to before. And it seems the length of time and the level of fussing/squirming is decreasing... I don't know if I'll need to find a new method but for now it's working provided I'm consistent ??

Mary - posted on 11/09/2010

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Wow, Oh Thank God I`m not alone in this.. My little baby girl "Marvel" is into EVERYTHING too!! I`m tired of saying " NOOOO, Don`t ...That`s Wrooooong" . I agree that is normal in her age, but it`s getting into me too, I mean I`m a working mom, so i`ve became more agressive with her sometimes.. I`m trying to be calm but sometimes i can`t. And that`s too bad i know but I found out that if i left her and went to another room for about 4-5 mins to take a deeeep breath, It can be much better.. So, that`s the only solution i got for now!!!

Amy - posted on 11/08/2010

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Also I agree with Krystie, and everything is out of her reach, but she is getting taller and more fearless! So on my bookshelf the second shelf is full of her book and wooden jigsaws which she is allowed to pull out and I pick them up and put them back a good three or four times a day, as I'd much rather this than her climbing to get the cd's ornaments, my books. etc. etc. which are on the other shelves.

Amy - posted on 11/08/2010

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Hi all,

Like many of you I was not prepared for the chaos which is my (16 mth old) daughter! My son (who is now 5) was a different temperament altogether- or I have just forgotton!!

What I do is tell her NO each time and move her away from whatever it is, i.e. the DVD drawer now I ask her to close it (which she does) and then she gets praise, which obviously she loves. Also I will either make no big deal out of something i.e. one of my son's toys so she loses interest as she isn't getting a reaction to it. Or I will look at it with her all my plugs do have covers on them but I let her turn let light switches on and off to again try and reduce the curiosity. Also my daughter is interested in the bin so I ask her to put things into the bin and again praise her once she has done this, instead of her getting stuff out of the bin.

I think it's about consistancy and teaching your child what things are to try and reduce the curiosity in them.

Hope this helps.

Good Luck :-)

Krystle - posted on 11/08/2010

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I've heard of parents who can say "No!" to their toddler and then they listen, but I think it's a myth! lol

I just think, "If there was a plate of chocolate or cookies in front of me all day, and someone just kept telling me "No!", I'd be frustrated too....and I'd always try to sneak it too!" I don't think it's much different for toddlers, everything is interesting to them and they want to see it. If you don't want them playing with it (like picture frames), you just have to have it out of their reach.

My opinion is that's it's easier for everyone if you remove "temptations" at this stage. Then you don't have to be the bad-guy by saying no all the time. :)

Natasha - posted on 11/05/2010

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What a relief! This was going to be my next post. As I listen to most of the stories I think immediately 'that's my son!". I never had this problem with my daughter so I was in no way prepared for "Havoc" (our new name for him). We have had to rearrange the house, stack up the dinning room chairs as he pulls them into position to reach what he wants, he has mastered the child locks we put on the cupboards, we have to keep the bathroom doors shut at all times.
I will try the timeout strategy and let you guys know how it works. Wish me luck.

[deleted account]

My daughter is the same way! I tried swatting her hands for pulling at plugs. After several attempts of saying "NO" and taking her away from the plug (or whatever she's getting into). I took her to the couch ( or a seat in the room we're in), sat her in my lap and folded her arms, holding onto her hands so that she can't move her arms. She hated that SOOOOOO much more then swatting her hand. I would hold her in place for about 30 seconds and when I put her down she didn't go anywhere near the plug. She still tries to get to plugs every once in awhile but not several times a day like she used too.

Valerie - posted on 11/05/2010

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Thank God...I am not alone. Every advice listed I've tried and still no luck. Swatting the hand or the behind does nothing but make her look at me, laugh and go right back to doing what she just got swatted for. Then there isthe cute little innocent smile that makes you feel guilty when you speak firmly. Don't even get me started on the on the wounded puppy dog look if I happen to yell because she refuses to heed to the "No's" and swats. God help us all.

Melissa - posted on 11/04/2010

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I COMPLETELY understand all of your issues! I am a stay at home mom with my 16mo old daughter and I also babysit an 18mo old little girl. These two toddlers are definitely terrorizers! They have been together since they were a few months old and boy do they love to tag team me! haha They are usually causing trouble together, but there are times where they will be in 2 different rooms and I just can't seem to keep up with it lol. They also give me that lovely devilish grin when they know they are doing something bad and laugh when I say no, or just don't listen to the command at all regardless of how firm I am. I usually have to pick them up and take them away from what they are doing. They do seem to listen to me while I kneel down and tell them why they shouldn't be doing it but that doesn't stop them. I have just started doing timeouts with the girls. My daughter goes in her crib, and Maryn goes in the pack and play in my bedroom. I was uneasy about doing this at first because I didn't want their punishment place to be where they sleep. However, it's not easy to keep up with two of them in separate corners at the same time lol. I mostly started doing timeout because they have started trying to smack each other when they both want the same toy, sippy cup, etc. I tried the tapping of the hands, but I feel like it's just reinforcing the bad behavior. It's been quite the ride, but terrible two's are coming and I am preparing myself for the worst and trying to be patient! Good luck to all of you Mommies!

Ann - posted on 11/04/2010

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My suggestion is to pick your battles, he's exploring and learning... but what we have found works for our 16 month old is time outs... I wasn't sure if they would work, we hadn't decided on discipline but our day care provider had started them.. so 1 minute time out if he's doing something unsafe, or distructive. ie touch picture on the wall that could fall on him. He suprisingly stays put in the hallway, crys but we tell him what he did wrong and give him a hug after his minute. He gets one warning about doing something he shouldn't then time out. I know it works because afterwards he thinks about doing something he shouldn't and we say if you do that again you'll get another time out... and he didn't do it!! it was amazing!!! Give it try.

Bridget - posted on 11/01/2010

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Oh my goodness! I am not the only one with a naughty boy. I am always looking for advise. Redirecting him seems to be the only thing that works for us. I also tried the hand smack and felt awful. I'm sure it gets better, but until then.....AGHHHHH!!

Jenni - posted on 11/01/2010

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Well, it looks like it is an age thing :)

We have just come out of a week of HELL. He just won't listen and thinks "No" is hilarious. I also put him in his playpen for a "timeout" and it seemed to get worse. Anyway, we have gone into household lockdown. He is literally moved from one room to another with me and can't leave that room. EVERY cupboard, drawer, shelf etc is thoroughly babyproofed. It seems to have worked. I am relieved to see I am not alone and assume that it is something I will learn to deal with - like wiggly nappy changes! It was a massive problem to begin with and now it is part of the routine :)
My wine bill seems to be increasing by the minute too.

Amy - posted on 10/31/2010

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TIME OUTS!!! My son is exactly the same way and my doctor told me to try putting him in a time out (1 minute for every year of age). I thought it was nuts but he actually listens much better now. I say "No" once and if he continues I tell him if he does it again he's going into time out, and it works!!! His "time out" is in a playpen in the corner of his room and I leave the room for 1 minute. Obviously I don't think a child that young would actually sit in a chair in the corner. Good luck I hope this helps!

Brenda - posted on 10/31/2010

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My daughter is in to everything too! I've rearranged as much as possible so I don't always have to say no to the same things like getting at the trash can. I've tried telling her no, moving her to something different, and time outs. The time outs work the best. I put her in the corner for about a minute. She screams the whole time but doesn't go back to the trouble behavior when she gets out. I've also noticed that she gets in more trouble when she is bored or wanting my attention. If I have been busy doing house work for a while she will get into trouble. I try to take frequent breaks from my chores to play with her for a few minutes and it seems to help. She's only 16 months so her patiance is still very short!

Gwen - posted on 10/31/2010

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My 15 m/o is VERY, VERY active, too! (Been walking since 9.5 months and going ever since). Both my mom and hubby have suggested resorting to smacking, but my instincts were against it. Now, let me clarify that I am in no way against spanking, but I just think when they're this age they are waaaay too prone to imitation and with their limited verbal skills and inablility to commnunicate their emotions, smacking seems like a great way to show frustration or anger! And they don't have the logicical ability yet to think, "Ok, they're the parents, they're allowed to do things I'm not." And who wants to teach yet another bad habit? Sure enough, when DH has done it, he's smacked something!



So what have we done? Timeouts. I know it sounds crazy, but it really works. In fact, we can even warn him of impending timeout and he complies (most of the time!). I think the key is consistency and communication. We tell him what's going on, why he's going to timeout, and continue to place him back in the same timeout spot until WE tell him, "Ok, timeout all done." All it takes is him sitting without crying or trying to get up for a beat or two. Try it! Let me know!



P.S. It can take quite some time to achieve the end goal of him sitting there, but if you start it you have to finish it, or it won't work. I find Mommies are a little more patient and effective at this exercise! ;) (But generally my hubby does great!)

Tenille - posted on 10/30/2010

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My 16 month old girl does the same stuff...even smacks her own butt when she knows she's being naughty.

Kristen - posted on 10/30/2010

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I am going through the same thing with my 16 month old son. What seems to work is he understands what an "owie" is, so I tell him how something will give him an owie, if he is playing with something he really shouldn't be. He seems to understand it and leaves it alone. But I have to remind him frequently throughout the day. Distraction with anything really works for us. Seriously the best detraction device is a shoe box, he has found so many purposes for it.

Bryanna - posted on 10/30/2010

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The best advice I can give is keep trying, stick to your guns and redirect. My 16 m old gets into lots too. We just have to do the same things over and over. He has learned that there are some things that must be left alone. (like the plants at grandma's house) We started early saying 'not for baby' and used a hand swat. When he goes for something he shouldn't we say 'not for baby!' and usually he'll stop. If not I just redirect him to something that is allowed.

Christina - posted on 10/30/2010

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lol...so funny, i'm glad to know i don't have the only wild child!! ( as i'm writing this, he in on the dining room table throwing everything out of my purse!!) okay i'm back!! lol...i guess i have to just keep saying no, listen to his whining, and have a glass of wine until he gets old enough to understand a time out!! But I also know when he does get that old, I'll say "what happened to my little baby boy?" LOL...Good luck moms :)

Dyanna - posted on 10/28/2010

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Wow! I'm not alone. We've resorted to calling my little guy "hurricane Logan". He even has enough nerve to pinch me and then HE says "OWW". If only he wasn't so cute! I say no and he laughs. I smack his hand and he laughs and does it again while he looks right at me! The only thing that seems to work is that I lightly swat his diapered behind and say no. Especially if he runs out into the street which is no laughing matter. Believe it or not, even though I smack his hand harder than I swat his behind, his lip automatically sticks out and he gets the point. My kids are hard headed I guess. I have to find a way to get my point across in case of life threatening times. I did this with my 4 yr old when he was younger and now all I have to do with him is put him in time out. So, it gets better with age.

CHERYL - posted on 10/28/2010

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omg i could of wrtten that,i thought i was the only one.i get sooo sick of hearing myself say no.my twins are 16ms my son is the lil bugger and also hits his sister and throwing. has no fear climbing on the sofa and jumping off.my mum says im not telling them enough.ive put a fire guard round the fire and the tv,but people say thats not the answer either. sorry ive not been any use and hope someone can give any ideas.

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